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Study Committee Biographical Information John G. Milliken, Chairman, is Partner at the firm of Venable, Baetjer & Howard with offices in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Mr. Milliken served as Secretary of Transportation for the Commonwealth of Virginia from 1990 to 1993 and on many local and regional governmental boards. He was a mem- ber of the Arlington County Board for 10 years, member and Chairman of the Board of the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, and member of the National Capital Interstate Air Quality Commission and Northern Virginia Transportation Commission. Mr. Milliken received his bachelor's degree from Haverford College and his law degree from the University of Virginia Law School. He recently served as a member of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Study Committee on Urban Transportation Congestion Pricing. Forrest M. Council is Director of the Highway Safety Research Center at the University of North Carolina, where he was Deputy Director and member of the research staff since 1967. Dr. Council's research interests include highway safety, crash records analysis, driver education, and crash protection. He received his bachelor of science and master of science degrees from North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of North Carolina. Dr. Council is a member and past president of the National Child Passenger Safety Association, Chairman of the TRB Committee on Methodology for Evaluating Highway Improvements, member of the Board of Directors and Editorial Board and Chairman of the Scientific Program Committee of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, and member of TRB and U.S. Department of Transportation advisory panels concerned with future highway safety research needs, enforcement training for occu- pant restraint activities, large truck safety data needs, highway-related 419

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MANAGING SPEED 420 countermeasure analysis, occupant restraint research needs, and the safety relationship between vehicle configuration and highway design. He currently serves as a member of the TRB Research and Technology Coordinating Committee, which provides input to the Federal Highway Administration on its research activities. Terrance W. Gainer is Executive Assistant Chief of Police of the Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, D.C., a position he assumed in May 1998. As second in command, he is responsible for a staff of 4,800. Before coming to Washington, he was Director of the Illinois State Police, where he managed the work of more than 3,700 employees engaged in patrol, criminal investigation, and police train- ing. During his 30-year career in law enforcement, he served as Special Assistant to the Secretary and Director for Drug Enforcement and Program Compliance at the U.S. Department of Transportation; Deputy Inspector General, State of Illinois; and Chief Legal Officer, Homicide Detective, Patrol Officer, Supervisor and Commander in the Chicago Police Department. Mr. Gainer received his bachelor of art in sociology at St. Benedict's College and his master of science in management and public service and juris doctor at DePaul University. He is on the Executive Board of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and is Commissioner of the National Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement. Mr. Gainer is currently a Captain in the U.S. Navy Reserve. Nicholas J. Garber is Chairman of the Department of Civil Engineering and Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Virginia. For the past 15 years, he has been engaged in research in the areas of traffic operations and highway safety. Before joining the University of Virginia in 1980, Dr. Garber was a Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Sierra Leone. Before that, he taught at the State University of New York at Buffalo and worked as a design engineer in several consulting engineering firms. Dr. Garber received his bachelor of science in civil engineering from the University of London and his masters and doc-

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421 Study Committee Biographical Information torate from Carnegie-Mellon University. A registered professional engineer in the Commonwealth of Virginia and a chartered engineer of the United Kingdom, he is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), the Institution of Civil Engineers of Great Britain, and TRB's Committee on Traffic Safety in Maintenance and Construction Operations. Kristine M. Gebbie is Associate Professor of Nursing at the Columbia University School of Nursing. Before that she served as the first National AIDS Policy Coordinator under President Clinton, Secretary of the Department of Health for the State of Washington, where she helped establish a statewide trauma center system, Administrator of Public Health in Oregon, and Coordinator of Ambulatory Care for the St. Louis University Hospitals. Dr. Gebbie's research interests are focused on health policy and health services. She has a bachelor of science in nursing from St. Olaf College, a master of nursing from the University of California at Los Angeles, and a doc- tor of public health in health policy from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Gebbie has served as a member of the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association and has chaired the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on the prevention of HIV infection, and the Environment, Safety, and Health Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of Energy. She is also a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on several of its committees. Jerome W. Hall is a Professor of Civil Engineering and past Chairman of the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of New Mexico, where he has taught and conducted research since 1977. Before that, he served for 7 years on the civil engineering fac- ulty at the University of Maryland. Dr. Hall is an expert on the oper- ational effects of roadway geometry and highway design, with particular emphasis on low-volume roads. He received his bachelor of science in physics at Harvey Mudd College and his master of science

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MANAGING SPEED 422 and Ph.D. in civil engineering at the University of Washington. Dr. Hall is a fellow in ITE. He has served on TRB's Study Committee on Truck Access, chaired TRB's Group 3 Council, and chaired National Cooperative Highway Research Program panels on stopping sight distance and resurfacing, restoration, and rehabilitation project effects. Charles A. Lave is Professor of Economics, Director of the Graduate Program in Transportation Sciences, Associate Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies, and Faculty Assistant to the Chancellor at the University of California at Irvine. He has conducted research and published numerous articles about the effect of changes in speed limits on highway safety. Dr. Lave graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in political science from Reed College and a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University. He is a member of the American Economics Association, the American Statistical Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Policy Analysis and Administration. He was also a member of the TRB Committee for the Study of the Benefits and Costs of the 55-mph National Maximum Speed Limit. John M. Mason, Jr., is Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research in the College of Engineering and Professor of Civil Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. As a Faculty Research Associate at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, his research interests include geometric design, highway operations, and roadway safety, including the operational and geometric characteristics of heavy trucks. He has also provided expert testimony in highway tort- related litigation. Before coming to Pennsylvania State University, Dr. Mason served on the staff of the Texas Transportation Institute and the Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, where he held various research and teaching positions. In addition to his academic interests, Dr. Mason has had practical experience work- ing with consulting engineering firms. He holds a bachelor's degree in transportation from The Pennsylvania State University, a master's degree in transportation engineering from Villanova University, and a

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423 Study Committee Biographical Information Ph.D. in civil engineering from Texas A&M University. Dr. Mason is a member of ASCE, ITE, the Tau Beta Pi National Engineering Honor Society, and TRB's Committee on Geometric Design. Frederick Mosteller is Roger I. Lee Professor of Mathematical Statistics, Emeritus, at Harvard University. His research interests include theoretical and applied statistics, biostatistics, policy, public health and medicine, and social science. During his distinguished aca- demic career, Dr. Mosteller served as Chairman of the Department of Statistics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Director of the Technology Assessment Program, Chairman of the Department of Health Policy and Management, and Chairman of the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health, and member of the faculty of the Harvard Medical School. He holds a bachelor's and master's degree in mathematics from the Carnegie Institute of Technology, and a master's and Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University. Dr. Mosteller is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the IOM; a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the American Statistical Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and an hon- orary fellow of the Royal Statistical Society. He has also served on numerous National Research Council and IOM committees. Sharon D. Nichols is Executive Director of the Western Highway Institute (WHI), the trucking industry's research and educational resource in the Western United States and Canada. Prior to joining WHI, she served as Managing Director of the Wyoming Trucking Association. Her areas of expertise include truck size and weight, motor carrier taxation, and economic development. Ms. Nichols cur- rently serves as a Governor's appointee to the Wyoming Water Development Commission and a cochairman of the Governor's Workers Insurance Task Force. She is a past chairman of the Wyoming Highway Users Federation, the Executive Council of the Western Trucking Associations, and the Job Service Employers

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MANAGING SPEED 424 Committee. Ms. Nichols is a graduate of the University of Wyoming, with a bachelor of arts degree in English literature. Clinton V. Oster is Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs and former Associate Dean of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. He has also served as Director of the Indiana University Transportation Research Center, Research Director of the President's Aviation Safety Commission, and President of the Transportation Research Forum. Dr. Oster's research interests include aviation safety and the effects of govern- ment regulation on the private sector. He holds a B.S.E. from Princeton University, an M.S. from Carnegie-Mellon University, and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Dr. Oster chaired the TRB Committee for the Study of the Federal Employers' Liability Act and served on the TRB Committee for the Study on Air Passenger Service and Safety Since Deregulation. Richard A. Retting is Senior Transportation Engineer with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). His areas of research interest include speed limits and vehicle speeds, photo enforcement technology, traffic control devices, and pedestrian safety. Prior to join- ing IIHS in 1990, he served as Deputy Assistant Commissioner for the New York City Department of Transportation in charge of safety programs. Mr. Retting received a bachelor's degree in public adminis- tration from Baruch College, City University of New York, and a mas- ter's degree in transportation planning and engineering from Polytechnic University of New York. He is chairman of ITE's Transportation Safety Council and Secretary of TRB's Committee on Pedestrians. Mr. Retting was the 1989 recipient of the Volvo Traffic Safety Award. Thomas B. Sheridan is Ford Professor of Engineering and Applied Psychology, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Director of the Human-Machine Systems Laboratory at the Massachusetts

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425 Study Committee Biographical Information Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has spent most of his pro- fessional career. He is an expert in human factors, with research inter- ests in modeling and design of human-machine systems in automobile driving, aviation, and other areas. Dr. Sheridan received his B.S. from Purdue University, his M.S. from the University of California at Los Angeles, and his ScD from MIT. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and past president of the IEEE Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society; fellow and past presi- dent of the Human Factors Society; and member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has served on numerous committees of the National Research Council and was a member of TRB's Committee for a Review of the National Automated Highway System Consortium Research Program. William C. Taylor is Professor of Civil Engineering and previous Chairperson of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan State University, where he has taught since 1972. Before that, Dr. Taylor was Executive Director of the Interagency Transportation Council for Michigan, Traffic Research Engineer for the Ohio Department of Highways, and Traffic Engineer for Cleveland. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering at Case Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Ohio State University. Dr. Taylor is a member of ITE and headed the technical committee that developed speed zone guidelines. He is also a member of ASCE and the National Society of Professional Engineers. George Tsebelis is Professor of Political Science at the University of California at Los Angeles. He has also taught at Duke, Stanford, and Washington Universities and was a recipient of a Guggenheim fel- lowship. Dr. Tsebelis's areas of research include decision making in political systems and game theory as applied to enforcement strategies and sanctions. He received undergraduate degrees in engineering from the National Technical University of Athens and political sci- ence from the Institut d'tudes Politiques de Paris, an engineering

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MANAGING SPEED 426 doctorate in mathematical statistics from the Pierre et Marie Curie University (Paris VI), and a Ph.D. in political science from Washington University. Dr. Tsebelis is on the Editorial Board of Governance and the Journal of Theoretical Politics. David C. Viano is Principal Research Scientist in the Research and Development Center at General Motors Corporation (GMC), where he has worked as Assistant Department Head, Staff Research Engineer, and Senior Research Engineer since coming to GMC in 1974. Dr. Viano is an expert in the area of biomechanics and injury control. He received his bachelor of electrical engineering at Santa Clara University, his master's and Ph.D. in applied mathematics at the California Institute of Technology, his postdoctorate in biomedical science at the University and ETH Zurich, and his Doctor of Medicine from the Karolinska Institute of Medicine in Stockholm. Dr. Viano is a fellow of the Society of Automotive Engineers, the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; he is a member of the American Trauma Society, the American Automobile Manufacturers Association, the American Society of Biomechanics, the American College of Surgeons, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He also served as a member of several National Research Council committees and two TRB study commit- tees--the Committee To Identify Measures that May Improve the Safety of School Bus Transportation and the Committee To Identify Research Needs for Occupant Restraints. Richard P. Weaver retired from the California Department of Transportation in September 1997 after a 36-year career. For the last 7 years, he held the position of Deputy Director and Chief Engineer with responsibility for a staff of approximately 9,200 performing highway design, right-of-way construction, project management, and local programs--a $2.6 billion annual program. Before that, he served as District Director in Fresno, California, and Deputy Director for the

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427 Study Committee Biographical Information Fresno County Tax Initiative and held several positions related to construction of light rail projects in Sacramento and San Diego. Mr. Weaver holds a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Sacramento State University, a master's degree in public administra- tion from San Diego State University, and a graduate certificate in transportation from the California Community College system. He is a registered civil engineer and a registered traffic engineer in California. Mr. Weaver served as a member of TRB's Research and Technology Coordinating Committee and Strategic Highway Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials' (AASHTO's) Standing Committee on Highways, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Traffic Engineering, and Chairman of AASHTO's delegation to the National Committee to Rewrite the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

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