COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

JAMES J. DUDERSTADT (NAE), chair, is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his baccalaureate degree in electrical engineering with highest honors from Yale University and his doctorate in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology. His teaching and research interests include nuclear fission reactors, thermonuclear fusion, high-powered lasers, computer simulation, science policy, information technology, and higher education. Dr. Duderstadt has been awarded the E.O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching, and the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation. Dr. Duderstadt has served on and/or chaired numerous public and private boards, including the National Science Board; the Executive Council of the National Academy of Engineering; the Commission on Science, Engineering and Public Policy of the National Academy of Sciences; the Big Ten Athletic Conference; the University of Michigan Hospitals; Unisys; and CMS Energy. He has also been elected to numerous honorific societies, including the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi.


ERICH BLOCH (NAE), currently a consultant and Distinguished Fellow with the Council on Competitiveness, was director of the National Science Foundation from 1984 to 1990. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Buffalo in 1952 and has been awarded honorary degrees from the University of Massachusetts, George Washington University, Colorado School of Mines, SUNY Buffalo, University of Rochester, Oberlin College, University of Notre Dame, Ohio State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Washington College, and City University of New York. Mr. Bloch’s extensive work history with IBM Corporation culminated in his appointment as vice president of technical personnel development (1980–1984). From 1980 to 1984, he was also a member of the National Research Council Committee on Commercial Computers



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES JAMES J. DUDERSTADT (NAE), chair, is President Emeritus and University Professor of Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received his baccalaureate degree in electrical engineering with highest honors from Yale University and his doctorate in engineering science and physics from the California Institute of Technology. His teaching and research interests include nuclear fission reactors, thermonuclear fusion, high-powered lasers, computer simulation, science policy, information technology, and higher education. Dr. Duderstadt has been awarded the E.O. Lawrence Award for excellence in nuclear research, the Arthur Holly Compton Prize for outstanding teaching, and the National Medal of Technology for exemplary service to the nation. Dr. Duderstadt has served on and/or chaired numerous public and private boards, including the National Science Board; the Executive Council of the National Academy of Engineering; the Commission on Science, Engineering and Public Policy of the National Academy of Sciences; the Big Ten Athletic Conference; the University of Michigan Hospitals; Unisys; and CMS Energy. He has also been elected to numerous honorific societies, including the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Phi Beta Kappa, and Tau Beta Pi. ERICH BLOCH (NAE), currently a consultant and Distinguished Fellow with the Council on Competitiveness, was director of the National Science Foundation from 1984 to 1990. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Buffalo in 1952 and has been awarded honorary degrees from the University of Massachusetts, George Washington University, Colorado School of Mines, SUNY Buffalo, University of Rochester, Oberlin College, University of Notre Dame, Ohio State University, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Washington College, and City University of New York. Mr. Bloch’s extensive work history with IBM Corporation culminated in his appointment as vice president of technical personnel development (1980–1984). From 1980 to 1984, he was also a member of the National Research Council Committee on Commercial Computers

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy in Automated Manufacturing. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and recipient of the IEEE Founder’s Award (1990), a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an honorary member of the American Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1980. RAY M. BOWEN is President Emeritus and professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University. Dr. Bowen earned his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University, his M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Texas A&M University. His research interests are focused on nonlinear continuum mechanics, especially the theory of mixtures. From 1994 to 2002, Dr. Bowen was president of Texas A&M. During Dr. Bowen’s tenure, the university was admitted to the Association of American Universities, numerous academic programs were expanded and enhanced, and a major capital campaign was completed successfully. Before assuming the presidency of Texas A&M, Dr. Bowen held appointments at Oklahoma State University, University of Kentucky, Rice University, and Louisiana State University. He has held two managerial positions at the National Science Foundation, is a member of several professional societies, and has authored or coauthored numerous professional articles and books. Dr. Bowen was appointed to the National Science Board in 2002. BARRY HOROWITZ (NAE) is professor of systems engineering at the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the faculty there, he was chairman and founder of Concept Five Technologies, an e-business solutions provider specializing in applying enterprise application integration and security technologies to business-to-business systems. He was also president and CEO of MITRE Corporation and president and CEO of Mitretek Systems. Dr. Horowitz was awarded the highest civilian award of the U.S. Air Force for

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy his contributions to the Gulf War related to locating, tracking, and destroying SCUD missiles. He holds a B.S.E.E. from City College of New York and an M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from New York University. LEE L. HUNTSMAN is President Emeritus of the University of Washington (UW). Prior to his term as president, he was UW provost and vice president for academic affairs and associate dean for scientific affairs in the School of Medicine. Dr. Huntsman joined the UW faculty in 1968 as a professor of bioengineering. His research, which has received continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is on the application of engineering principles to biology and medicine, particularly in the measurement and regulation of the cardiovascular system. Dr. Huntsman received a B.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1963 and a Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and has served on the Board of Directors of the Biomedical Engineering Society and the Whitaker Foundation Governing Committee. In 1998, Dr. Huntsman chaired the NIH Working Group on Review of Bioengineering and Technology and the Instrumentation Development Research Group for the Center for Scientific Review. JAMES H. JOHNSON JR. is a professor of civil engineering and dean of the College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences at Howard University. Dr. Johnson received his B.S. from Howard University, M.S. from the University of Illinois, and Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. His research interests include the treatment and disposal of hazardous substances, the evaluation of environmental policy issues in relation to minorities, and the development of environmental curricula and strategies to increase the number of underrepresented groups in science, technology, engineering, and math disciplines.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy Dr. Johnson is chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors Executive Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), a member of EPA’s Science Advisory Board, and co-principal investigator of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored HBCU/MI Environmental Technology Consortium. He is also a member of the Environmental, Health and Safety Panel, which monitors activities at the three DOE national laboratories operated by the University of California. Dr. Johnson is a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and the Engineering Deans Council of the American Society for Engineering Education and a member of several university and private-sector advisory committees. He has published more than 50 scholarly articles, contributed to three books, and co-edited two books. A fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the American Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors, American Water Works Association, American Society for Engineering Education, and Tau Beta Pi, Dr. Johnson is also a registered professional engineer in the District of Columbia and a diplomate of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. In 2005, he was awarded the National Society of Black Engineers Lifetime Achievement Award in Academia. KRISTINA M. JOHNSON is dean of engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke University. Before joining the faculty at Duke, Dr. Johnson was a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Colorado and cofounder and director of the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Optoelectronic Computing Systems. Dr. Johnson received her B.S. (with distinction), M.S., and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University. Her areas of expertise include liquid crystal electro-optics and liquid crystal-on-silicon microdisplays. She has 44 patents or patents pending.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy Dr. Johnson has been recognized as a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator (1985), IBM Faculty Fellow (1985), Fulbright Fellow (1991), Optical Society of America Fellow (1995), and IEEE Fellow (2002). She is a recipient of the Dennis Gabor Prize for Creativity and Innovation in Modern Optics (1993), the Photonics Spectra Circle of Excellence Award (1994), and the State of Colorado Technology Transfer Award (1987). In 2003, she became a member of the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame (2003). Dr. Johnson is a founder of four companies and a member of the boards of directors of Mineral Technologies Inc., Dycom Industries; the advisory boards of Smith College Pickering, Carnegie Mellon University School of Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, and the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee to the Engineering Directorate. She is also a member of the Fulbright Association, Sigma Xi, Lasers and Electro-optic Society, Society of Photo-Instrumentation Engineers, Society for Information Display, Tau Beta Pi, IEEE, and American Society of Engineering Education. LINDA P.B. KATEHI is John A. Edwardson Dean of Engineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University. Before joining Purdue, she was associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Engineering and professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. Dr. Katehi has a master’s degree and doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles and a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens. Her areas of expertise include the development and characterization of microwave, millimeter-printed circuits; the computer-aided design of VLSI interconnects; the development and characterization of micromachined circuits for microwave, millimeter-wave, and submillimeter-wave applications, including microelectromechanical (MEMS) switches, high-Q evanescent mode filters, and MEMS

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy devices for circuit reconfigurability; and the development of low-loss lines for submillimeter-wave and terahertz-frequency applications. She has five patents. Dr. Katehi has received many honors, including the Distinguished Educator Award of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (2002), IEEE Marconi Prize (2001), the Third Millennium Medal of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (2000), the Microwave Prize of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (1997), Fellow, IEEE (1995), Humboldt Research Award (1994), the Presidential Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation (1987), the Schelkunoff Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (1985), and the W.R. King Award of the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society (1984). DAVID MOWERY is William A. and Betty H. Hasler Professor of New Enterprise Development at the Walter A. Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. During the 2003–2004 academic year, he was Marvin Bower Fellow at the Harvard Business School. He received his undergraduate degree and Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Business School. Dr. Mowery taught at Carnegie Mellon University, was study director for the Panel on Technology and Employment of the National Academy of Sciences, served in the Office of the United States Trade Representative, and has been a member of several National Research Council panels. His research interests include the economics of technological innovation and the effects of public policies on innovation. He has testified before Congress and served as an adviser to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, various federal agencies, and industrial firms.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy Dr. Mowery has published numerous academic papers and has written or edited many books. His academic awards include the Raymond Vernon Prize from the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management, the Economic History Association Fritz Redlich Prize, the Business History Review Newcomen Prize, and the Cheit Outstanding Teaching Award. CHERRY MURRAY (NAE, NAS) is deputy director for science and technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Prior to this appointment, she was physical sciences research senior vice president, Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. Dr. Murray has been recognized for her work in surface physics, light scattering, and complex fluids; she is best known for her work on imaging in phase transitions of colloidal systems. After receiving a B.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she joined Bell Laboratories as a member of the technical staff in 1978. She has numerous publications and two patents to her credit. She is currently chair of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lucent managed by Bell Laboratories to promote research in nanotechnology as part of the economic development of New Jersey. Dr. Murray is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, National Academy of Sciences, and American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of numerous advisory committees and boards. Currently, she is a general councilor of APS and a member of the Executive Board of the National Academy of Sciences, Governing Board of the National Research Council, and University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy MALCOLM R. O’NEILL is vice president and chief technical officer of Lockheed Martin Corporation. He joined the company in 1996 as vice president, Mission Success, Operation, and Best Practices in Space Systems, after retiring from the U.S. Army. During his military career, he held numerous prominent positions, including director, Ballistic Missile Defense Organization; deputy director, Strategic Defense Initiative Organization; director, Army Acquisition Corps; commander, Army Laboratory Command; and deputy for program assessment and international cooperation, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Research, Development and Acquisition). He also directed numerous research, development, engineering, and manufacturing operations. Dr. O’Neill earned a B.S. in physics from De Paul University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Rice University. GEORGE SCALISE is president of the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA), the trade association that represents the microchip industry. During a 30-year career in the industry before joining SIA in 1997, Mr. Scalise was executive vice president of operations and chief administrative officer at Apple Computer and held numerous executive positions at National Semiconductor Corporation, Maxtor Corporation, Advanced Micro Devices, Fairchild Semiconductor, and Motorola Semiconductor. He was chairman of SIA’s Public Policy Committee, a founder, member, and chairman of the board of the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and a member of the Board of Directors of SEMATECH. Mr. Scalise is active on many boards and advisory committees, including the Board of Directors of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Twelfth Federal Reserve District; Cadence Design Systems; Network Equipment Technologies; and the Foreign Policy Association. In addition, he has served on a number of university and government boards. He earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University.

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy ERNEST T. SMERDON (NAE) is Dean Emeritus of the University of Arizona. Prior to this, he was vice provost and dean of the College of Engineering, Janet S. Cockrell Centennial Chair in the Civil Engineering Department, Bess Harris Jones Centennial Professor in Natural Resource Policy Studies in the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, and vice chancellor for academic affairs for the University of Texas System. Dr. Smerdon was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1986 and has served on seven NAE committees, including the Committee on Career-Long Education for Engineers, Academic Advisory Board, and Committee on the Technology Policy Options in a Global Economy. Dr. Smerdon has served on 11 National Research Council committees and chaired two. He was a board member of ABET and represented the board on the Engineering Accreditation Commission. Dr. Smerdon received awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society of Agricultural Engineers, American Water Resources Association, and American Society for Engineering Education. In 1982, he received the Honor Award for Distinguished Service in Engineering and, in 2003, the degree, Doctor of Science, honoris causa, from the University of Missouri-Columbia, his alma mater. Dr. Smerdon has written widely on engineering education and spoken on the subject in 12 countries outside the United States. ROBERT F. SPROULL (NAE), vice president and fellow at Sun Microsystems Laboratories, founded and led the Massachusetts branch of Sun Microsystems Laboratories for more than 10 years, and he is still involved in research there. Since his undergraduate days, he has been building hardware and software for computer graphics: clipping hardware, an early device-independent graphics package, page description languages, laser printing hardware and software, and window systems. He has also been involved in VLSI

OCR for page 41
Engineering Research and America’s Future: Meeting the Challenges of a Global Economy design, especially of asynchronous circuits and systems. Before joining Sun, he was a principal with Sutherland, Sproull & Associates, an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University, and a member of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. He is coauthor with William Newman of Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics and an author of the recently published Logical Effort, which deals with designing fast CMOS circuits. Dr. Sproull is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is currently a special partner of Advanced Technology Ventures. DAVID N. WORMLEY is dean of the College of Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. His previous positions include associate dean of engineering and head of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Wormley’s research is focused on the dynamic analysis, optimization, and design of advanced control systems, transportation systems, and fossil-fuel energy systems. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and American Society for Engineering Education. Dr. Wormley is a former member of the Executive Committee of the National Research Council Transportation Research Board, which he chaired in 1997. He has received the ASME Lewis Moody Award and the NASA Certificate of Recognition. Dr. Wormley earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT.