C
Biographies of Panel Members and Staff

GEORGE A. PAULIKAS, Chair, retired after 37 years at the Aerospace Corporation, having joined Aerospace in 1961 as a member of the technical staff and later becoming department head, laboratory director, vice president, and senior vice president. He became executive vice president in 1992. He received the company’s highest award, the Trustees’ Distinguished Achievement Award, in 1981 in recognition of research leading to a new understanding of the dynamics of space radiation and its effect on spacecraft. Dr. Paulikas’ other awards and honors include the Jimmy Doolittle Fellowship Award, the National Reconnaissance Office Gold Medal, the Air Force Space Division Award for Excellence, and the Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Medal, both in 1981 and 1986. Dr. Paulikas is vice-chair of the NRC Space Studies Board. He has also served on a number of NRC review committees, including the Committee on the Scientific Context for Space Exploration, Committee on Systems Integration for Project Constellation, Workshop Committee on Issues and Opportunities Regarding the Future of the U.S. Space Program, and the Committee to Review the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan.


RETA F. BEEBE is a professor in the Astronomy Department at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, and a member of the Space Studies Board. Dr. Beebe’s research activities involve the study of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn and, in particular, studies of cloud motions and evolution in Jupiter’s atmosphere. She is the author of several books and articles concerning telescopic observations of the giant planets, including Jupiter: The Giant Planet. Dr. Beebe manages the Atmospheres Discipline Node and is project scientist of NASA’s Planetary Data System, and she was a member of the Galileo imaging team and lead scientist for the team using the Hubble Space Telescope to provide context images for the Galileo project. She is the former chair of the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences and was a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). Dr. Beebe now serves as chair of COMPLEX, and she chaired the Solar System Exploration Survey’s Giant Planets Panel.


WENDY M. CALVIN is a research associate professor at the Arthur Brant Laboratory for Exploration Geophysics, University of Nevada, Reno, using infrared spectroscopy in research that emphasizes characterizing the nature and association of water, volatile ices, and minerals to better understand physical and chemical processes occurring in a variety of planetary and space environments. Her current research includes studies of alteration minerals and ices on Mars to understand climate history and variability and volatile element transport and sequestrations. She is a participating scientist on the Mars Exploration Rover and is on the MARCI camera team on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dr. Calvin was a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and the Committee on the Astrophysical Context of Life.


WILLIAM D. COCHRAN is a senior research scientist in the McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas, Austin. His research interests include searches for extrasolar planetary systems; high-precision measurements of stellar radial-velocity variations; and studies of variable stars, asteroids, planetary atmospheres, and comets. A leader in the study of planetary systems, Dr. Cochran is a co-investigator on NASA’s Kepler mission and has served as chair of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American



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Review of Goals and Plans for NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences C Biographies of Panel Members and Staff GEORGE A. PAULIKAS, Chair, retired after 37 years at the Aerospace Corporation, having joined Aerospace in 1961 as a member of the technical staff and later becoming department head, laboratory director, vice president, and senior vice president. He became executive vice president in 1992. He received the company’s highest award, the Trustees’ Distinguished Achievement Award, in 1981 in recognition of research leading to a new understanding of the dynamics of space radiation and its effect on spacecraft. Dr. Paulikas’ other awards and honors include the Jimmy Doolittle Fellowship Award, the National Reconnaissance Office Gold Medal, the Air Force Space Division Award for Excellence, and the Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Medal, both in 1981 and 1986. Dr. Paulikas is vice-chair of the NRC Space Studies Board. He has also served on a number of NRC review committees, including the Committee on the Scientific Context for Space Exploration, Committee on Systems Integration for Project Constellation, Workshop Committee on Issues and Opportunities Regarding the Future of the U.S. Space Program, and the Committee to Review the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan. RETA F. BEEBE is a professor in the Astronomy Department at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, and a member of the Space Studies Board. Dr. Beebe’s research activities involve the study of the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn and, in particular, studies of cloud motions and evolution in Jupiter’s atmosphere. She is the author of several books and articles concerning telescopic observations of the giant planets, including Jupiter: The Giant Planet. Dr. Beebe manages the Atmospheres Discipline Node and is project scientist of NASA’s Planetary Data System, and she was a member of the Galileo imaging team and lead scientist for the team using the Hubble Space Telescope to provide context images for the Galileo project. She is the former chair of the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences and was a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). Dr. Beebe now serves as chair of COMPLEX, and she chaired the Solar System Exploration Survey’s Giant Planets Panel. WENDY M. CALVIN is a research associate professor at the Arthur Brant Laboratory for Exploration Geophysics, University of Nevada, Reno, using infrared spectroscopy in research that emphasizes characterizing the nature and association of water, volatile ices, and minerals to better understand physical and chemical processes occurring in a variety of planetary and space environments. Her current research includes studies of alteration minerals and ices on Mars to understand climate history and variability and volatile element transport and sequestrations. She is a participating scientist on the Mars Exploration Rover and is on the MARCI camera team on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Dr. Calvin was a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration and the Committee on the Astrophysical Context of Life. WILLIAM D. COCHRAN is a senior research scientist in the McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas, Austin. His research interests include searches for extrasolar planetary systems; high-precision measurements of stellar radial-velocity variations; and studies of variable stars, asteroids, planetary atmospheres, and comets. A leader in the study of planetary systems, Dr. Cochran is a co-investigator on NASA’s Kepler mission and has served as chair of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American

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Review of Goals and Plans for NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences Astronomical Society. Dr. Cochran currently serves on the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, the Committee on Priorities for Space Science Enabled by Nuclear Power and Propulsion: A Vision for Beyond 2015, and the Panel on Astronomy and Astrophysics. EDWARD FRIEDMAN has been with the Boeing Company’s NASA Program area since 2000 and was selected as a Boeing Technical Fellow in 2001. Dr. Friedman provides technology support to teams pursuing both large and small NASA space science and exploration opportunities. He led the Boeing Terrestrial Planet Finder contract. Dr. Friedman is a member of the engineering teams for the infrared telescopes SPIRIT, SPECS, and SAFIR. From 1993 to 2000, he was Ball Aerospace’s chief technologist in the civil space business unit, with an emphasis on planet detection technologies and systems. His specialties include systems engineering and architectures for space telescopes, the role of humans and robots in telescope assembly, design/modeling tools, imaging systems/optical components, interferometry/formation flying, and cryogenic systems. As an adjunct professor of electrical engineering at the University of Colorado, he led a student’s successful pursuit of a Ph.D. in adaptive optics. He is the author of three books on electro-optics technology. SARAH T. GILLE is an associate professor at the University of California, San Diego, in the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Her research interests are in climate and ocean dynamics. She interprets satellite observations from altimetry and scatterometry, with the goal of understanding physical processes controlling ocean climate. She is a member of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Ocean Vector Wind Science Team and the NASA JPL Jason Science Working Team. Dr. Gille previously served on the NRC Committee on Earth Studies and the Committee to Review the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Strategic Plan. JOHN HAAS is the New England division manager for Applied Research Associates, located in South Royalton, Vermont. Dr. Haas is currently working on the development of sensors and analytical methodologies for process, environmental, biotechnical, and geotechnical monitoring applications, including planetary exploration. Dr. Haas received his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Massachusetts and has been principal investigator on nearly two dozen research programs in the areas of field analytical chemistry instrumentation, detection of chemicals of concern to human health, sensor development, geochemistry/geophysics, in situ sampling and measurement techniques, remote fiber-optic sensing, laser spectroscopy, and miniature devices. Among his achievements are the invention of various Raman, fluorescence, absorbance, and refractive index fiber-optic probes, a miniature fluorescence sensor, and a unique Raman spectrograph. Dr. Haas has also developed an array of small chemical, radiation, and geophysical sensors and samplers for use in the cone penetrometer, a subsurface geophysical and geochemical characterization tool. In 2002, he served on the NRC committee that produced the report Safe on Mars. MICHAEL G. HAUSER is the deputy director at the Space Telescope Science Institute and adjunct professor in the physics and astronomy department at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests are infrared astronomy, cosmology, the interplanetary medium, and the interstellar medium. Dr. Hauser is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (fellow), the American Astronomical Society, the American Physical Society (fellow), the International Astronomical Union, and Sigma Xi. Dr. Hauser is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, 1984 and 1991; the John C. Lindsay Memorial Award (Goddard Space Flight Center), 1986; and the Senior Executive Service Meritorious Executive Award, 1994. He was a science team member of NASA’s IRAS and COBE missions, and principal investigator of the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment. Dr. Hauser served as a member of the NRC Panel on Astronomy Education and Policy of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee and as a member of the Steering Committee for the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics.

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Review of Goals and Plans for NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences CHRISTOPHER O. JUSTICE received his Ph.D. from the University of Reading, United Kingdom. Since 2001 he has been a professor and research director in the Geography Department of the University of Maryland. He is a team member and land discipline chair of the NASA Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Science Team and is responsible for the MODIS Fire Product and the MODIS Rapid Response System. He is a member of the NASA NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) Science Team. He is co-chair of the GOFC/GOLD-Fire Implementation Team, a project of the Global Terrestrial Observing System (GTOS), and a member of the Integrated Global Observation of Land (IGOL) Steering Committee. He is on the Strategic Objective Team for USAID’s Central Africa Regional Project for the Environment. His current research is on land cover and land use change, the extent and impacts of global fire, global agricultural monitoring (with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service), and their associated information technology and decision support systems. JOHN W. LEIBACHER is the director of the NSF-sponsored Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) program and an astronomer at the National Solar Observatory. He is outgoing chair of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and a member of the AAS Committee on Astronomy and Public Policy. Dr. Leibacher is involved in all aspects of helioseismology. Dr. Leibacher’s NRC service includes membership on the Committee on Solar and Space Physics (chair, 1987-1990) and the Space Studies Board. His most recent NRC service was as a member of the Committee on PI-led Missions in the Space Sciences: Lessons Learned. ROBERT P. LIN is a professor of physics and director of the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include solar and interplanetary physics, lunar and planetary studies, high-energy astrophysics, and the physics of Earth’s magnetosphere. He is leading a program of high-resolution gamma-ray and hard x-ray spectroscopy of cosmic and solar sources. Dr. Lin is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and is the recipient of the Docteur Honoris Causa de l’Universite de Toulouse, the NASA Mars Global Surveyor Group Achievement Award, and the NASA Lunar Prospector Group Achievement Award. He is the recipient of the NASA Ames Research Center Honor Award to Lunar Prospector Science Team and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Group Achievement Award for the HESSI Imaging Hardware Team. Dr. Lin served on the NRC Committee on Solar and Space Physics, and on the Panel on Solar and Space Physics of the Committee on Priorities for Space Science Enabled by Nuclear Power and Propulsion: A Vision for Beyond 2015. MOLLY K. MACAULEY is a senior fellow with Resources for the Future in Washington, D.C. Her research interests include space economics and policy and the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation. Her other research projects include exploring the use of economic incentives to manage space debris; issues in space risks; the value of geostationary orbit; and the value of information, particularly information derived from space-based remote sensing. She is a member of the International Academy of Astronautics, the NRC Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board, and the Steering Committee for Workshops on Issues of Technology Development for Human and Robotic Exploration and Development of Space. STEVEN R. MAJEWSKI is an associate professor in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. His research interests cover galactic structure, stellar populations, galaxy evolution, deep-space surveys, astrometry, infrared astronomy, and instrumentation. He is a science team member and key project principal investigator for the NASA Space Interferometry Mission. Since his graduate work at the University of Chicago’s Yerkes Observatory, from which he received his Ph.D. in 1991, his research has concentrated on the evolution of galaxies and stellar populations, both from the perspective of studying extragalactic systems to high redshifts and through detailed study of the spatial, kinematical, and abundance distributions of populations in the Milky Way and its satellite system. In 1997 Dr. Majewski was awarded a David and Lucile Packard Foundation Fellowship, a National Science Foundation Career Award, and a Cottrell Scholar Award from the Research Corporation.

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Review of Goals and Plans for NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences BARRY H. MAUK is a physicist and section supervisor in the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Mauk’s professional service includes co-investigator with NASA’s Voyager Low Energy Charged Particles Investigation and NASA’s Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument Investigation, team member of the Galileo Energetic Particle Detector investigation, instrument scientist on the Messenger Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer investigation, mission scientist for the Living with a Star Geospace program, lead energetic particle investigator for the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission, and lead energetic particle investigator for the Juno New Frontiers mission. Dr. Mauk has served on the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, NASA’s Science Working Group Panel for the Inner Magnetospheric Imager, NASA’s Multiprobes Mission Science Definition Team, and NASA’s Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap Committee in 1999. He served as a member of NASA’s Sun-Earth Connections Roadmap Committee in 2002. Dr. Mauk is a member of the NRC Committee on Distributed Arrays of Small Instruments for Research and Monitoring in Solar-Terrestrial Physics: A Workshop and of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics. LOUISE M. PROCKTER is a planetary scientist at the Applied Physics Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University. Her research interests include surface process and morphology of icy satellites and asteroids. She has extensive involvement in the planning of the Galileo Europa mission, working with the imaging team and Galileo engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She also participated in the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission and is currently the deputy instrument scientist for the MESSENGER mission. In 2003 she served as a member of the science definition team for the proposed Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter and chaired the team’s geology subgroup. Dr. Prockter is a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration. J. CRAIG WHEELER is the Samuel T. and Fern Yanagisawa Regents Professor of Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin and past chair of the department. He is president-elect of the American Astronomical Society. His research interests cover supernovas, black holes, and astrobiology. He has published more than 200 scientific papers, an astronomy text, and a novel and has edited five books. A popular science lecturer, Dr. Wheeler has received many awards for his teaching. He was a visiting fellow at JILA and at the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and was a Fulbright Fellow in Italy. He currently serves as co-chair of the NRC Committee on the Origins and Evolution of Life and is a member of the Space Studies Board. Dr. Wheeler previously served on the NRC Steering Committee for the Task Group on Space Astronomy and Astrophysics. Staff SANDRA J. GRAHAM, study director, received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Duke University in 1990. Her past research focused primarily on topics in bioinorganic chemistry, such as the exchange mechanisms and reaction chemistry of biological metal complexes and their analogs. From 1990 to 1994 she held the position of senior scientist at the Bionetics Corporation, where she worked in the science branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA headquarters. Since 1994 Dr. Graham has been a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board, where she has directed numerous studies, many with a focus on space life sciences and microgravity sciences. DWAYNE A. DAY joined the Space Studies Board in 2005 as a research associate. Dr. Day received his Ph.D. in political science from George Washington University and has previously worked for the Columbia Accident Investigation Board and the Congressional Budget Office. MATTHEW BROUGHTON, Space Studies Board summer undergraduate intern, is a senior at Augsburg College in Minnesota. He is currently pursuing a bachelor of science in physics and a bachelor of arts in

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Review of Goals and Plans for NASA’s Space and Earth Sciences English. His undergraduate research has been in space physics, specifically the distribution of Pc 3-4 waves in the outer magnetosphere. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the Space Studies Board (SSB). She joined the SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and has also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. CELESTE NAYLOR joined the NRC and the Space Studies Board in June 2002 as a senior project assistant. She has worked with the Committee on Assessment of Options to Extend the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope and also with the Committee on Microgravity Research and the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station. Ms. Naylor is a member of the Society of Government Meeting Professionals and has more than 7 years of experience in event management.