F
Biographical Information Committee on Innovating for Profit in Russia: Encouraging a “Market Pull” Approach

Alvin W. Trivelpiece (Chair): Since May 2000, Trivelpiece has been a consultant to Sandia National Laboratories and an advisor to various government agencies. From January 1989 through March 2000, he served as the director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In January 1996, he was appointed president of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the managing and operating contractor for ORNL. Trivelpiece served as the executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from April 1987 to January 1989. He came to the AAAS from the U.S. Department of Energy, where he served as the director of the Office of Energy Research from 1981 to 1987. Trivelpiece was a professor of physics at the University of Maryland from 1966 to 1976 and was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Department of Electrical Engineering from 1959 to 1966. He is a past member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on Science and Technology Policy Aspects of Selected Social and Economic Issues in Russia, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on the Technical Aspects of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and several other NRC committees. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. He was a fellow of the AAAS, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the American Association of University Professors, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi.


W. Mark Crowell is currently associate vice chancellor for economic development and director of the Office of Technology Development at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Prior to joining UNC in September 2000,



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Innovating for Profit in Russia: Summary of a Workshop F Biographical Information Committee on Innovating for Profit in Russia: Encouraging a “Market Pull” Approach Alvin W. Trivelpiece (Chair): Since May 2000, Trivelpiece has been a consultant to Sandia National Laboratories and an advisor to various government agencies. From January 1989 through March 2000, he served as the director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In January 1996, he was appointed president of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the managing and operating contractor for ORNL. Trivelpiece served as the executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from April 1987 to January 1989. He came to the AAAS from the U.S. Department of Energy, where he served as the director of the Office of Energy Research from 1981 to 1987. Trivelpiece was a professor of physics at the University of Maryland from 1966 to 1976 and was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Department of Electrical Engineering from 1959 to 1966. He is a past member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on Science and Technology Policy Aspects of Selected Social and Economic Issues in Russia, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on the Technical Aspects of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and several other NRC committees. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. He was a fellow of the AAAS, the American Physical Society, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and is a member of the American Nuclear Society, the American Association of University Professors, Tau Beta Pi, and Sigma Xi. W. Mark Crowell is currently associate vice chancellor for economic development and director of the Office of Technology Development at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. Prior to joining UNC in September 2000,

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Innovating for Profit in Russia: Summary of a Workshop he was associate vice chancellor and director of technology transfer and industry research at North Carolina State University for eight years and director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Duke University for five years. Crowell has been active in the Licensing Executives Society and has been a frequent speaker and member of the Board of Trustees of the Association of University Technology Managers. Additional professional activities include numerous consulting and expert witness assignments on intellectual property and business development issues, including a current project with AAAS evaluating technology-based economic development initiatives in the state of Michigan. Eugene B. Krentsel serves as director of the International Technology Commercialization Institute at the University of Missouri, Columbia. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry from the Institute of Chemical Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In his current position, he has developed and implemented numerous federally and privately sponsored technology commercialization projects; provided assistance to many faculty members from various departments across the university in building and maintaining national and international research and development (R&D) teams; guided various U.S. businesses in commercialization of technologies and scientific research developed by foreign centers of excellence; initiated and developed funding for the Series of Satellite Presentations “Commercial Applications of Russian Scientific Research;” and implemented a number of highly successful collaborative programs between University of Missouri, Columbia and several leading Russian institutions in the areas of joint research, education, and distance learning. Prior to joining the University of Missouri in 1992, he served as a vice president and director of international business for Polycom, Inc., a privately-held Moscow-based company involved in the technology transfer business. Mark B. Myers is a visiting executive professor in the management department for 2002-2005 at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development, and technology competencies. Myers is active in working on U.S. R&D policy through studies sponsored by the NAS. He serves on the NRC Science, Technology and Economic Policy Board and co-chaired its study of Intellectual Property in the Knowledge Based Economy. His other NRC service includes Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs, the oversight board for the study of an Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program, and the study of Innovation Models for Aerospace Technologies. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, following a 36-year career in its R&D organizations. He was senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from

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Innovating for Profit in Russia: Summary of a Workshop 1992 to 2000. Myers is chairman of the Board of Trustees of Earlham College, has held a visiting faculty position in electrical engineering at Stanford University, and has served as an adjunct faculty member in material science at the University of Rochester. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Earlham College and a doctorate in materials science from Pennsylvania State University. Dennis I. Robbins is a founder and principal partner with Techpiphany, Inc., a provider of services and support in the area of research commercialization, with 27 years of experience in the semiconductor industry. Prior to his role with Techpiphany, he held a variety of management and executive roles at Texas Instruments (TI) during his 24-year career with the company. From 1997 through 2000, as a vice president of Texas Instruments, he managed the worldwide manufacturing operations for TI’s analog and mixed-signal products, with ten factories worldwide, supporting $4 billion per year in revenue. Previously at TI, he managed an R&D project targeted at the development of Field Emission Display technology for the flat-panel display market and was a member of the board of directors of the U.S. Display Consortium. He is a patent holder in this area. Other TI roles include acquisition/integration manager for the $600-million acquisition of Silicon Systems Incorporated by TI; product department manager for TI’s analog and mixed-signal ICs, with responsibility for design engineering, product engineering, production planning; and profit and loss and quality assurance manager for TI’s Volume Products (all analog and logic products). He retired from Texas Instruments in January 2001 to pursue interests in the area of start-up companies. In addition to his role with Techpiphany, he is on the board of directors of MAI Logic, a Fremont, California, based fabless IC company, and is on the advisory boards of several start-ups. He holds a Ph.D. in solid state physics from Arizona State University (1976). He also holds an M.S. (Arizona State University, 1973) and a B.A. in physics (DePauw University, 1971). His research was in the field of Raman scattering analysis of crystalline defects.

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