• Clearly shows that the JPDO recognizes the importance of safety, security, weather, and other key elements of an air transportation system.

  • Provides a convenient forum for all of the parties involved in each element of the air transportation system to exchange information.

Nonetheless, this structure hinders and is inconsistent with an optimal, product-oriented approach for organizing an air transportation system research and acquisition program. The current structure also works against the idea of forming multidisciplinary integrated product teams, in that most of the IPTs are discipline-specific. Furthermore, the second and third objectives listed above could be accomplished more effectively in other ways. For example, many aviation safety groups already exist in government, industry, and academia. The JPDO could rely on one or more of these as a center of excellence for aviation safety management, and the Master IPT and/or the NGATS Institute could include representatives of centers of excellence in safety, weather, etc., to provide expertise and advice. Quick action to restructure the IPTs is needed to prevent the current structure from becoming institutionalized and incorporated into the long-term plans of the federal agencies involved in the JPDO.

In addition, the Master IPT seems to function primarily as an administrative coordinating body. Successful development and implementation of NGATS is unlikely unless the JPDO develops a stronger system engineering and integration function and a larger permanent staff for the Master IPT and the eight subordinate IPTs. In almost all cases, the IPT heads work only part-time on JPDO activities, and in some cases they still carry a full workload from the departmental positions they held before they were appointed as IPT heads. Asking senior departmental officials to serve as IPT heads increases the likelihood that departments and agencies involved in the JPDO will support the plans of the IPTs. On the other hand, it makes it impossible for the IPT heads to devote themselves fully to the difficult task of developing and implementing IPT plans.

Finding 4-1. IPT Organization. Even though the current IPTs have multiagency membership, they are functioning primarily as experts in specific disciplines rather than as cross-functional, integrated, multidisciplinary teams that can deliver specific products to improve operational capabilities of the air transportation system.

Recommendation 4-1. IPT Organization. As soon as possible, the JPDO’s IPT organization should be modified to better support the core goal of meeting increased demand in each phase of operation by structuring the IPT organization to match the structure recommended for the operational concepts. All of the current IPTs (except for the Master IPT) should be disbanded and replaced with three new IPTs:

  • Airport Operations IPT

  • Terminal Area Operations IPT

  • En Route and Oceanic Operations IPT

Linkages

Sections 7.1 through 7.8 of the Integrated Plan describe the IPTs and the transformation strategy associated with each IPT. Included in the description of each IPT is a list of cross-strategy linkages. Table 4-1 shows all of these linkages. An “O” marks the strategy for which an IPT in the leftmost column is responsible. Each “X” in the row for a particular IPT shows what other strategies/IPTs that IPT will coordinate

TABLE 4-1 IPT Linkages Depicted in Chapter 7 of the Integrated Plan

IPT

NGATS Transformation Strategies

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

7.7

7.8

Airport Infrastructure

Security System

Agile Air Traffic System

Situational Awareness

Safety Management Approach

Environmental Protection

Reduce Weather Impacts

Harmonize Globally

7.1

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

7.2

 

O

X

X

X

X

 

X

7.3

X

 

O

X

X

X

X

X

7.4

 

X

X

O

X

 

X

X

7.5

X

X

X

X

O

X

X

X

7.6

X

 

X

 

 

O

 

X

7.7

X

X

X

X

X

 

O

X

7.8

X

X

X

 

X

X

X

O

NOTE: “O” indicates the strategy for which the particular IPT is responsible; “X” indicates the cross-strategy linkage with the other IPT strategy areas to coordinate work.



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