D
Statement of Task and Study Approach

STATEMENT OF TASK

The Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) will study the integrated plan for a next generation air transportation system (see <www.jpdo.aero>). The plan has been developed by the Next Generation Air Transportation System Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO). This study will conduct a technical assessment of the research, development, and technology components of the integrated plan that leads to publication of a study report.

Inputs from the private sector, including representatives of commercial aviation, general aviation, aviation labor groups, aviation research and development entities, aircraft and air traffic control suppliers, and the space industry, will be considered as part of the assessment. The assessment may also discuss and comment upon the process that the JPDO is using to develop and implement the integrated plan, in the context of lessons learned from past air transportation system planning efforts. In particular, the committee may also review planning documents generated by the integrated product teams (IPTs) established by the JPDO, to the extent that the IPT plans provide additional details on how the JPDO intends to achieve its goals and objectives.1

The committee will hold approximately three meetings to review the integrated plan and issue a report summarizing key findings and recommendations for improving research and technology development.

The scope of this project includes research and technology components of civil aviation, homeland security, and national security flight operations involving airlines, air taxis, helicopters, general aviation, and unmanned aerial vehicles. The scope does not include the accuracy of cost estimates that may appear in the integrated plan.

STUDY APPROACH

The committee may comment specifically on four key elements that Congress directed the JPDO to include in the Integrated Plan (see Appendix B: The Vision 100—Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act, Public Law 108-176, Section 709). These elements are as follows:

  1. national vision statement for an air transportation system capable of meeting potential air traffic demand in 2025

  2. description of system demand and performance requirements (e.g., safety, security, mobility, efficiency, capacity, quality, affordability, noise, and emissions)2,3

    1. how system performance requirements were derived

    2. national goals, objectives, and policies the national vision would support

    3. enabling, interrelated socioeconomic determinants

    4. associated models and analyses

  1. operational concepts with the potential to meet system performance requirements for all system users

1  

As this report was being prepared, the IPTs were in various stages of formation. Most had not yet completed much work, and the committee did not have the opportunity to examine whatever products the IPTs may have generated (except for the Environmental IPT; see Appendix G).

2  

Section 709 of the Act contains two lists of system characteristics, each with five parameters. Both lists include safety, security, and efficiency. The list in ¶709.b has mobility and capacity. The list in paragraph ¶709.c.1 includes quality and affordability. All seven of these items are listed here in the statement of task, along with two other important factors (noise and emissions) that are mentioned elsewhere in Section 709.

3  

Section 709 does not explain what “quality” means, apart from the other eight system characteristics.



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Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System D Statement of Task and Study Approach STATEMENT OF TASK The Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) will study the integrated plan for a next generation air transportation system (see <www.jpdo.aero>). The plan has been developed by the Next Generation Air Transportation System Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO). This study will conduct a technical assessment of the research, development, and technology components of the integrated plan that leads to publication of a study report. Inputs from the private sector, including representatives of commercial aviation, general aviation, aviation labor groups, aviation research and development entities, aircraft and air traffic control suppliers, and the space industry, will be considered as part of the assessment. The assessment may also discuss and comment upon the process that the JPDO is using to develop and implement the integrated plan, in the context of lessons learned from past air transportation system planning efforts. In particular, the committee may also review planning documents generated by the integrated product teams (IPTs) established by the JPDO, to the extent that the IPT plans provide additional details on how the JPDO intends to achieve its goals and objectives.1 The committee will hold approximately three meetings to review the integrated plan and issue a report summarizing key findings and recommendations for improving research and technology development. The scope of this project includes research and technology components of civil aviation, homeland security, and national security flight operations involving airlines, air taxis, helicopters, general aviation, and unmanned aerial vehicles. The scope does not include the accuracy of cost estimates that may appear in the integrated plan. STUDY APPROACH The committee may comment specifically on four key elements that Congress directed the JPDO to include in the Integrated Plan (see Appendix B: The Vision 100—Century of Aviation Reauthorization Act, Public Law 108-176, Section 709). These elements are as follows: national vision statement for an air transportation system capable of meeting potential air traffic demand in 2025 description of system demand and performance requirements (e.g., safety, security, mobility, efficiency, capacity, quality, affordability, noise, and emissions)2,3 how system performance requirements were derived national goals, objectives, and policies the national vision would support enabling, interrelated socioeconomic determinants associated models and analyses operational concepts with the potential to meet system performance requirements for all system users 1   As this report was being prepared, the IPTs were in various stages of formation. Most had not yet completed much work, and the committee did not have the opportunity to examine whatever products the IPTs may have generated (except for the Environmental IPT; see Appendix G). 2   Section 709 of the Act contains two lists of system characteristics, each with five parameters. Both lists include safety, security, and efficiency. The list in ¶709.b has mobility and capacity. The list in paragraph ¶709.c.1 includes quality and affordability. All seven of these items are listed here in the statement of task, along with two other important factors (noise and emissions) that are mentioned elsewhere in Section 709. 3   Section 709 does not explain what “quality” means, apart from the other eight system characteristics.

OCR for page 38
Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System scale to accommodate and encourage substantial growth build on current initiatives integrate data streams from multiple agencies and sources (e.g., ground-based and space-based communications, navigation, and surveillance systems) to improve situational awareness and facilitate seamless global operations use the design of airport approach and departure flight paths to reduce public exposure to noise and emissions a multiagency research and development roadmap timelines through 2025 to develop and deploy the system most significant technical obstacles and the research and development activities necessary to overcome them, including the role of each federal agency, corporations, and universities for each activity technical milestones that will be used to evaluate activities