E
Biographies of Committee Members

S. MICHAEL HUDSON, Chair, recently retired as vice chairman of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison Engine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company, Inc. Previously, during his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, chief of preliminary design, and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines. Mr. Hudson has good insight into propulsion engineering issues, related business issues, and the European perspective on aviation issues. He has served on five other NRC committees, including the Committee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility, and is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board.

THOMAS M. COOK (NAE) is currently chief executive officer of TCI, a small analytical consulting firm specializing in applying operations research to significant business problems. Previously, Dr. Cook was chairman and chief executive officer of CALEB Technologies, an airline software firm, and he served as senior counselor to McKinsey & Company, Inc., focusing on the transportation sector. Prior to working with McKinsey, he developed large-scale information systems for Ling Temco Vought, Inc.; he taught operations research and computer science at both graduate and undergraduate levels for the University of Tulsa and Boston University and consulted with Arthur Young and Company. The majority of Dr. Cook’s career was spent with AMR Corporation, starting as director of operations research for American Airlines. He founded and was president of American Airlines Decision Technologies, the world’s largest airline software and consulting firm. He concluded his career at AMR as president of Sabre Technology Solutions, a $1 billion information technology services division of Sabre, Inc. Dr. Cook holds a doctorate in operations research from the University of Texas at Austin, a master’s degree in business from Southern Methodist University, and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Grinnell College. He was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering and cited for his leadership in advancing operations research and decision-support technologies within the transportation industry. He is the past president of the Institute of Management Sciences, the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operations Research Societies, and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He has also served as associate editor of Operations Research, Transportation Science, and Interfaces.

VAUGHN CORDLE is chief executive officer and chief analyst of AirlineForecasts, LLC, an independent research firm that specializes in airline industry research and forecasting. Mr. Cordle attended executive education programs at Kellogg and Wharton business schools and received the chartered financial analyst designation from the CFA Institute. He holds an airline transport pilot license and is typed in the following Aircraft: LrJet, CE-500, A320, B727, B737, B747-4, B757, B767, and B777.

JERALD M. DAVIS completed a 37-year career in military and civil service in increasingly demanding positions in military and civil aviation organizations. His last civil service duties were as manager of the Technical Programs Division, Flight Standards Service, FAA Headquarters. Mr. Davis holds an airline transport pilot certificate with type ratings in A300-600, A310, A320, B727, and CE-500. He holds a flight navigator certificate with 20 years’ experience in international operations in large turbojets. He has extensive experience in operational proof-of-concept testing, operational research, and the development of national policies, standards, criteria, and procedures for operational evaluation and approval of sophisticated, complex, and controversial



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Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System E Biographies of Committee Members S. MICHAEL HUDSON, Chair, recently retired as vice chairman of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison Engine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company, Inc. Previously, during his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, chief of preliminary design, and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines. Mr. Hudson has good insight into propulsion engineering issues, related business issues, and the European perspective on aviation issues. He has served on five other NRC committees, including the Committee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility, and is a member of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. THOMAS M. COOK (NAE) is currently chief executive officer of TCI, a small analytical consulting firm specializing in applying operations research to significant business problems. Previously, Dr. Cook was chairman and chief executive officer of CALEB Technologies, an airline software firm, and he served as senior counselor to McKinsey & Company, Inc., focusing on the transportation sector. Prior to working with McKinsey, he developed large-scale information systems for Ling Temco Vought, Inc.; he taught operations research and computer science at both graduate and undergraduate levels for the University of Tulsa and Boston University and consulted with Arthur Young and Company. The majority of Dr. Cook’s career was spent with AMR Corporation, starting as director of operations research for American Airlines. He founded and was president of American Airlines Decision Technologies, the world’s largest airline software and consulting firm. He concluded his career at AMR as president of Sabre Technology Solutions, a $1 billion information technology services division of Sabre, Inc. Dr. Cook holds a doctorate in operations research from the University of Texas at Austin, a master’s degree in business from Southern Methodist University, and a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from Grinnell College. He was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering and cited for his leadership in advancing operations research and decision-support technologies within the transportation industry. He is the past president of the Institute of Management Sciences, the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operations Research Societies, and the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). He has also served as associate editor of Operations Research, Transportation Science, and Interfaces. VAUGHN CORDLE is chief executive officer and chief analyst of AirlineForecasts, LLC, an independent research firm that specializes in airline industry research and forecasting. Mr. Cordle attended executive education programs at Kellogg and Wharton business schools and received the chartered financial analyst designation from the CFA Institute. He holds an airline transport pilot license and is typed in the following Aircraft: LrJet, CE-500, A320, B727, B737, B747-4, B757, B767, and B777. JERALD M. DAVIS completed a 37-year career in military and civil service in increasingly demanding positions in military and civil aviation organizations. His last civil service duties were as manager of the Technical Programs Division, Flight Standards Service, FAA Headquarters. Mr. Davis holds an airline transport pilot certificate with type ratings in A300-600, A310, A320, B727, and CE-500. He holds a flight navigator certificate with 20 years’ experience in international operations in large turbojets. He has extensive experience in operational proof-of-concept testing, operational research, and the development of national policies, standards, criteria, and procedures for operational evaluation and approval of sophisticated, complex, and controversial

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Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System flight technical programs for jet aircraft. He directed national FAA policy for all-weather operations, instrument flight procedures, navigation systems, approach and landing systems and minima, collision avoidance systems, and aviation weather and determined the operational suitability of ATC procedures, airport capacity and delay concepts, new aircraft and navigation systems, and pilot training programs. Mr. Davis has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Clemson University. He is currently working as a consultant to Airbus Industrie and the FAA associate administrator for regulation and certification. JOHN B. HAYHURST recently retired as president of Boeing Air Traffic Management and senior vice president of the Boeing Company after 33 years at Boeing and 3 1/2 years in this position. Previously, Mr. Hayhurst was vice president of business development for the Commercial Airplane Services business unit of Boeing Commercial Airplanes Group (BCAG). Prior to this assignment, Mr. Hayhurst served as vice president and general manager of 737 programs. In addition, he was general manager of the BCAG production site in Renton, Washington. Before that, he served as vice president for the Americas and was responsible for the Boeing business relationships with airline customers in North America and Latin America and for the sale of Boeing commercial airplanes to customers in those regions. Mr. Hayhurst joined Boeing in 1969 as a customer support engineer. He held positions of increasing responsibility related to commercial airplanes and in 1987 was promoted to vice president of marketing. In this position, he played a significant role in the launch of the Boeing 777. Subsequently, he was responsible for leading teams planning the design, development, and manufacture of aircraft larger than the Boeing 747. He then served as vice president-general manager of the Boeing 747-500X/600X program. Mr. Hayhurst is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and holds a bachelor’s degree in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University. He received a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Washington in 1971. In 1998, Mr. Hayhurst was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering by Purdue University. RICHARD MARCHI is senior vice president, technical and environmental affairs, for the Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA). He is responsible for overall supervision, direction, and coordination of the staff and activities of the ACI-NA Technical and Environmental Affairs Department. The department provides staff support to five ACI-NA committees: Technical Affairs, Environmental Affairs, Small Airports, Business Information Technologies, and Public Safety and Security. He is also responsible for the development, coordination, and presentation of technical, security, telecommunications, and environmental policies for consideration by the ACI-NA board of directors, for the preparation of responses to governmental issues of concern to airports, and for the development of airport testimony on technical matters. He is the association’s focal point representative in preparations for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) technical and environmental matters affecting member airports. Mr. Marchi is an active member of several FAA advisory committees and task forces, including the FAA Free Flight Select Committee, the FAA New Large Aircraft Facilitation Group, and the FAA Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee, where he serves as chairman of the Airport Technology Research Subcommittee. AMY R. PRITCHETT is an associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering and a joint associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research encompasses cockpit design, including advanced decision aids; procedure design as a mechanism to define and test the operation of complex, multiagent systems such as ATC systems; and simulation of complex systems to assess changes in emergent system behavior in response to implementation of new information technology. Dr. Pritchett is the editor of Simulation: Transactions of the Society for Modeling and Simulation for the air traffic area; associate editor of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication; technical program chair for the aerospace technical group of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; and co-chair of the 2004 International Conference in Human-Computer Interaction in Aerospace (HCI-Aero). EDMOND L. SOLIDAY was employed by United Airlines for over 35 years as a pilot, human factors instructor, flight manager, and staff executive. For the last 11 years with United, he served as vice president of safety, quality assurance, and security, and he was responsible for flight safety, aircraft cabin safety, occupational safety, environmental compliance, operational quality assurance, security, computer security, and emergency response. Captain Soliday made significant contributions in the development of emergency response methodologies, flight crew human factors safety initiatives, enhanced ground proximity warning devices, flight operations quality assurance programs (digital performance monitoring and analysis), union-management occupational safety initiatives, code share and express carrier auditing, implementation of aviation industry security screening technology, and risk analysis methodologies. Captain Soliday has served on numerous aviation safety advisory boards and commissions, including the Gore Commission’s Aviation Security Baseline Working Group, the Flight Operations Quality Assurance Advisory Rulemaking Committee, the IATA Flight Safety Committee, and the Air Transport Association Environment Executive Subcommittee. He chaired the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the Air Transport Association Safety Council,

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Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System the Star Alliance Safety Committee, and the Environmental Committee of the Air Transport Association of America. Captain Soliday currently serves on the executive board of the Flight Safety Foundation, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Global Airline Industry Program Advisory Group, the Adler Planetarium board of trustees, and the Trinity International University board of regents. In addition, Captain Soliday teaches an introduction to aviation safety and security course at the George Washington University Aviation Institute. He most recently served as a consultant to the Rand Corporation, the Boeing Company, and Greenbriar Equity, LLP. He has been awarded the Bendix Trophy, the Vanguard Trophy, the Laura Tabor Barbour International Air Safety Award, FBI and FAA Distinguished Service Awards, the Distinguished Flying Cross, two Bronze Stars, and the Purple Heart. HANSEL E. TOOKES II retired as president of Raytheon International, Inc. Mr. Tookes joined Raytheon in September 1999 as president and chief operating officer of Raytheon Aircraft and became chairman and chief executive officer in 2000. Mr. Tookes joined Raytheon from Pratt & Whitney’s Large Military Engines Group, where he served as president since 1996. In 1980, Mr. Tookes joined United Technologies Corp. and held increasingly responsible leadership positions at its Norden Systems and Hamilton Standard Division, including executive vice president of aircraft products and vice president of business planning. Mr. Tookes earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Florida State University in 1969, a masters in aeronautical systems from the University of West Florida in 1971, studied quantitative methods at Louisiana State University, and completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard University. IAN A. WAITZ is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is deputy head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the MIT Gas Turbine Laboratory. His principal fields of interest include propulsion, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, reacting flows, aeroacoustics, and, in particular, aspects of the above that relate to environmental issues associated with aircraft design and operation. Professor Waitz currently directs a variety of experimental and computational research in these areas. He has written approximately 50 technical publications, holds three patents, and has served as a consultant for 25 different organizations and as an associate editor of the AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power. Professor Waitz is the director of PARTNER: The Partnership for Air Transportation Noise and Emissions Reduction, which is the FAA/ NASA center of excellence for aircraft noise and aviation emissions mitigation. In 2003 Professor Waitz received a NASA Turning Goals Into Reality Award for Noise Reduction. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA, a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Society for Engineering Education, and currently teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in the fields of thermodynamics and energy conversion, propulsion, fluid mechanics, and environmental effects of aircraft. He received MIT’s 2002 Class of 1960 Innovation in Education Award and was appointed as a MacVicar Faculty Fellow in 2003. Dr. Waitz served on the NRC’s Committee on Aeronautics Research and Technology for Environmental Compatibility in 2002. DAVID C. WISLER (NAE) has held positions of increasing responsibility for conducting and managing advanced technology programs at GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) during the last 33 years. He is recognized as an international expert in turbomachinery aerodynamics technology and is currently the manager of University Programs and Aero Technology Laboratories at GEAE. He is responsible for implementing and coordinating research programs in a broad area of technologies, and he serves as the GEAE representative on a number of university advisory boards. He is the research and technology alliances team leader on the Industry-University-Government Roundtable on Enhancing Engineering Education. Dr. Wisler is an invited lecturer at numerous colleges and international conferences and holds adjunct professorships at the Ohio State University, Tsinghua University in Beijing, and the University of Cincinnati. He recently published several papers on critical areas of lifelong learning for engineering professionals. Dr. Wisler is a fellow of the ASME and the only three-time winner of the ASME Melville Medal (1989, 1998, and 2003), which is awarded for the best technical paper in all divisions of ASME. He is the vice president of ASME and the editor of the ASME Journal of Turbomachinery. He has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from Pennsylvania State University (1963), an M.S. in aerospace engineering from Cornell University (1965), and a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado (1970).