tion-related policy analysis and research with modest enhancements. We urge the proposed interagency working group, informed by research and development by the Economic Research Service and other relevant agencies, to consider low-cost ways to exploit surveys such as the Current Population Survey, the American Time Use Survey, panel surveys of specific age groups or the low-income population, and surveys that are designed for the addition of modules to track emerging trends.


Recommendation 6: The proposed interagency working group on diet and food consumption data should consider ways to enhance the usefulness of other federal datasets for food and nutrition-related policy analysis and research. Such datasets include the Current Population Survey, the American Time Use Survey, panel surveys that follow families, children, and the elderly over time, and surveys that are designed to include modules to track emerging trends.

CONCLUSION

This report has reviewed the kinds of information and data needed to more fully understand decisions that the population makes on food consumption and to guide policy makers. We believe the implementation of our recommendations and consideration of the suggestions we make throughout the report will improve the underlying knowledge base for food and nutrition-related policy planning in the United States.



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