Appendix C
Sense of the Senate on Airborne Chemical Agent Monitoring Systems at U.S. Chemical Stockpile Sites

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD

SENATE

PAGE S6885

May 21, 2003

BUNNING AMENDMENT SA 789

TEXT OF AMENDMENT

SA 789. Mr. BUNNING submitted an amendment intended to be proposed by him to the bill S. 1050, to authorize for fiscal year 2004 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe personnel strengths for such fiscal year for the Armed Forces, and for other purposes; which was ordered to lie on the table; as follows:

At the end of subtitle D of title X, add the following:

SEC. 1039. SENSE OF SENATE ON DEPLOYMENT OF AIRBORNE CHEMICAL AGENT MONITORING SYSTEMS AT CHEMICAL STOCKPILE DISPOSAL SITES IN THE UNITED STATES.

(a) FINDINGS.—The Senate makes the following findings:

(1) Millions of assembled chemical weapons from rockets, land mines, fuses, explosives, propellants, chemical agents, shipping and firing tubes, packaging materials, and similar material are stockpiled at chemical agent disposal facilities and depots sites across the United States.

(2) Some of these weapons are filled with nerve agents, such as GB and VX and blister agents such as HD (mustard agent).

(3) Hundreds of thousands of United States citizens live in the vicinity of these chemical weapons stockpile sites and depots.

(4) The airborne chemical agent monitoring systems at these sites are inefficient or outdated compared to newer and advanced technologies on the market.

(b) SENSE OF SENATE.—It is the sense of the Senate that the Secretary of the Army should develop and deploy a program to upgrade the airborne chemical agent monitoring systems at all chemical stockpile disposal sites across the United States in order to achieve the broadest possible protection of the general public, personnel involved in the chemical demilitarization program, and the environment.

SOURCE: Government Printing Office.

From CQ Congressional Record Service.

©2003 Congressional Quarterly, Inc. All rights reserved.



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Monitoring at Chemical Agent Disposal Facilities Appendix C Sense of the Senate on Airborne Chemical Agent Monitoring Systems at U.S. Chemical Stockpile Sites CONGRESSIONAL RECORD SENATE PAGE S6885 May 21, 2003 BUNNING AMENDMENT SA 789 TEXT OF AMENDMENT SA 789. Mr. BUNNING submitted an amendment intended to be proposed by him to the bill S. 1050, to authorize for fiscal year 2004 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe personnel strengths for such fiscal year for the Armed Forces, and for other purposes; which was ordered to lie on the table; as follows: At the end of subtitle D of title X, add the following: SEC. 1039. SENSE OF SENATE ON DEPLOYMENT OF AIRBORNE CHEMICAL AGENT MONITORING SYSTEMS AT CHEMICAL STOCKPILE DISPOSAL SITES IN THE UNITED STATES. (a) FINDINGS.—The Senate makes the following findings: (1) Millions of assembled chemical weapons from rockets, land mines, fuses, explosives, propellants, chemical agents, shipping and firing tubes, packaging materials, and similar material are stockpiled at chemical agent disposal facilities and depots sites across the United States. (2) Some of these weapons are filled with nerve agents, such as GB and VX and blister agents such as HD (mustard agent). (3) Hundreds of thousands of United States citizens live in the vicinity of these chemical weapons stockpile sites and depots. (4) The airborne chemical agent monitoring systems at these sites are inefficient or outdated compared to newer and advanced technologies on the market. (b) SENSE OF SENATE.—It is the sense of the Senate that the Secretary of the Army should develop and deploy a program to upgrade the airborne chemical agent monitoring systems at all chemical stockpile disposal sites across the United States in order to achieve the broadest possible protection of the general public, personnel involved in the chemical demilitarization program, and the environment. SOURCE: Government Printing Office. From CQ Congressional Record Service. ©2003 Congressional Quarterly, Inc. All rights reserved.