words, are the priorities in the decadal surveys still valid if their technological assumptions are significantly perturbed by the introduction of radically new capabilities such as nuclear power and propulsion?

  • Has there been sufficient foundational work in the form of mission and trade-off studies so that a quantitatively informed assessment can be made of what scientific opportunities are or are not enhanced or enabled by nuclear technologies?

These issues are considered in subsequent chapters of the report.

REFERENCES

1. See, for example, National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, pp. 202–203.

2. W.J. Broad, “U.S. Has Plans to Again Make Own Plutonium,” The New York Times, June 27, 2005, pp. A1 and A13.

3. See, for example, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Consolidation of Nuclear Operations Related to Production of Radioisotope Power Systems, DOE/EIS-0373D, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C., June, 2005. Available at <www.consolidationeis.doe.gov/>, accessed February 2, 2006.

4. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, p. 203.

5. G.R. Schmidt, R.L. Wiley, R.L. Richardson, and R.R. Furlong, “NASA’s Program for Radioisotope Power System Research and Development,” Space Technology and Applications International Forum—STAIF-2005, M.S. El-Genk, ed., American Institute of Physics, Melville, N.Y., 2005

6. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, p. 196.

7. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, p. 204.

8. R. Greeley, T.V. Johnson, et al., Report of the NASA Science Definition Team for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C., 2004.

9. See, for example, National Research Council, A Science Strategy for the Exploration of Europa, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1999, pp. 11–12.

10. R. Greeley, T.V. Johnson, et al., Report of the NASA Science Definition Team for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C., 2004, p. 49.

11. M.J. Hart, Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter High Capability Instrument Feasibility Study, Aerospace Report No. TOR-2004(2172)-3231, The Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, Calif., 2004.

12. See, for example, Congressional Budget Office, A Budgetary Analysis of NASA’s New Vision for Space Exploration, Congress of the United States, Washington, D.C., 2004, p. 22.

13. United States Government Accountability Office, NASA’s Space Vision: Business Case for Prometheus 1 Needed to Ensure Requirements Match Available Resources, GAO-05-242, Congress of the United States, Washington, D.C., 2005.

14. National Research Council, Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 2001.

15. National Research Council, The Sun to the Earth—and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003.

16. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003.

17. National Research Council, The Sun to the Earth—and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, pp. 10–11 and 85.

18. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, pp. 202–205.

19. National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, p. 205.

20. Letter from Edward J. Weiler, Associate Administrator of Space Science, to Lennard Fisk, Chair of the Space Studies Board, October 14, 2003.

21. See, for example, National Research Council, New Frontiers in the Solar System: An Integrated Exploration Strategy, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2003, pp. 176–177 and 189.

22. National Research Council, Solar and Space Physics and Its Role in Space Exploration, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2004.

23. National Research Council, “Review of Progress in Astronomy and Astrophysics Toward the Decadal Vision: Letter Report,” The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2005.

24. National Research Council, Science in NASA’s Vision for Space Exploration, The National Academies Press, Washington, D.C., 2005.



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