APPENDIX B
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Eleanor Singer (Chair) is a research professor at the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on motivation for survey participation and has touched on many of the important issues in survey methodology, such as informed consent, incentives, interviewer effects, and nonresponse bias. Two of her major studies examined the role of privacy and confidentiality concerns as factors in response to the 1990 and 2000 decennial censuses, and she was a member of the National Academies panel that produced Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics. She is most recently a coauthor of Survey Methodology (with Robert M. Groves and others) and a coeditor of Methods for Testing and Evaluating Survey Questionnaires (with Stanley Presser and others). She is a past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and a recipient of its award for exceptionally distinguished achievement. She holds a B.A. degree from Queens College and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Columbia University.


John M. Abowd is the Edmund Ezra Day professor of industrial and labor relations at Cornell University and director of the university’s Institute for Social and Economic Research. He is also a distinguished senior research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA, and a research affiliate at the Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique in Paris, France. Previously, he was also on the faculty of Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. Professor Abowd’s current research focuses



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Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Eleanor Singer (Chair) is a research professor at the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on motivation for survey participation and has touched on many of the important issues in survey methodology, such as informed consent, incentives, interviewer effects, and nonresponse bias. Two of her major studies examined the role of privacy and confidentiality concerns as factors in response to the 1990 and 2000 decennial censuses, and she was a member of the National Academies panel that produced Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics. She is most recently a coauthor of Survey Methodology (with Robert M. Groves and others) and a coeditor of Methods for Testing and Evaluating Survey Questionnaires (with Stanley Presser and others). She is a past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and a recipient of its award for exceptionally distinguished achievement. She holds a B.A. degree from Queens College and a Ph.D. degree in sociology from Columbia University. John M. Abowd is the Edmund Ezra Day professor of industrial and labor relations at Cornell University and director of the university’s Institute for Social and Economic Research. He is also a distinguished senior research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA, and a research affiliate at the Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique in Paris, France. Previously, he was also on the faculty of Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management. Professor Abowd’s current research focuses

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Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities on the creation and use of linked, longitudinal data on employees and employers. His other research interests include international comparisons of labor market outcomes; executive compensation, again with a focus on international comparisons; bargaining and other wage-setting institutions; and the econometric tools of labor market analysis. Joe C. Cecil is project director of the Program on Scientific and Technical Evidence in the Division of Research of the Federal Judicial Center (FJC), in Washington, DC. In that position he is responsible for judicial education and training about scientific and technical evidence and the lead staff for the FJC’s Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence, which is the primary source book on scientific evidence for federal judges. He is the author of numerous publications concerning legal standards affecting exchange of information for research purposes. Other areas of interest include the use of scientific and technical evidence in litigation, variations in procedures used by federal courts of appeals, and management of mass tort litigation. He holds a Ph.D. degree in psychology and a J.D. degree, both from Northwestern University. Constance F. Citro (Staff Director) is director of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous projects, including the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. George T. Duncan is a professor of statistics in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management and the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. His current research work centers on information technology and social accountability. He has lectured in Brazil, Italy, Turkey, Ireland, Mexico and Japan, among other places. Duncan chaired the Panel on Confidentiality and Data Access of the National Academies (1989-1993), which produced Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics, and he chaired the

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Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities American Statistical Association’s Committee on Privacy and Confidentiality. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 1996 he was elected Pittsburgh Statistician of the Year by the American Statistical Association. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota, all in statistics. Eugenia Grohman (Study Director) is associate executive director of the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education at the National Research Council. She served as study director for the panel during the last stages of its work. She has worked on many previous reports of the Committee on National Statistics, including Sharing Research Data and Private Lives and Public Policies: Confidentiality and Accessibility of Government Statistics. She attended the University of Chicago and received a B.A. degree in political science from the University of California at Los Angeles. V. Joseph Hotz is a professor in the Department of Economics at the University of California at Los Angeles. He also serves as a principal investigator of the California Census Research Data Center. His work concentrates on the economics of the family, applied econometrics, and the evaluation of social programs. His extensive published work has examined the relationship between the labor force participation and childbearing patterns of married women; the effect of working while in school on the subsequent wages of men in the United States; and methods for assessing the causal effects of social programs. His most recent work has focused on assessing the effects of child care regulations on children’s accident rates; the effects of welfare-to-work programs on the labor market successes of past welfare recipients; the strategic interactions of parents and adolescents over the latters’ engagement in risky behavior; and evaluation of the employment effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) Program. Michael Hurd is senior economist and director for the Center for the Study of Aging of RAND and a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Previously, he was professor of economics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, the steering committee for the Health and Retirement Study, and he was a member of the Technical Panel for the Social Security Advisory Council in 1990-1991. He has served as consultant to the National Institute on Aging on re-interviewing in the Retirement History Survey and to the Social Security Administration on reinterviewing in the New Beneficiary Survey. His research involves income

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Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities and wealth of the elderly and pensions and retirement economics. He received a Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of California at Berkeley. Diane Lambert is the director of statistics and data mining research at Bell Labs. She has made seminal contributions to fundamental statistics theory and methods and has been a leader in defining a role for statistics in data mining and massive data problems. She continues to introduce significant technological innovations in statistics, as well as fostering a close relationship between research and various business units. Lambert holds five patents. She previously served as editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association, and she is a fellow of both the American Statistical Association and the Institute of Mathematical Sciences. She holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Rochester in New York. Christopher Mackie (Study Director) is on the staff of the Committee on National Statistics and served as study director for most of the panel’s life. He served as study director for a number of economic measurement projects, including those that produced the reports, At What Price? Conceptualizing and Measuring Cost-of-Living and Price Indexes, and Beyond the Market: Designing Nonmarket Accounts for the United States. Prior to joining CNSTAT, he was a senior economist with SAG Corporation, where he conducted a variety of econometric studies in the areas of labor and personnel economics, primarily for federal agencies. He is the author of Canonizing Economic Theory. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of North Carolina and has held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and Tulane University. Kenneth Prewitt is the Carnegie professor of public affairs at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He was director of the U.S. Census Bureau from 1998 to January 2001. His government service followed a career in higher education and private philanthropy, including: president of the Social Science Research Council, senior vice president of the Rockefeller Foundation, director of the National Opinion Research Center, based at the University of Chicago, and professorships at the University of Chicago, Stanford University, Washington University, the University of Nairobi, and Makerere University in Uganda. His current research is on the policy consequences of racial classification in official statistics, and he recently published Science and Politics in Census-Taking. He holds a Ph.D. degree from Stanford University. Richard Rockwell is a professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut. Previously, he was executive director of the Institute for Social

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Expanding Access to Research Data: Reconciling Risks and Opportunities Inquiry/Roper Center for Public Opinion Research and director of the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan. One of the nation’s foremost experts on social science and public opinion research, he has published numerous articles on social science methodology and has designed related software programs. He holds a Ph.D. degree in sociology from the University of Texas at Austin.