BOX 1.1
Statement of Task

Conduct an assessment of the role of the federal quarantine stations given the changes in the global environment, including large increases in international travel, threats posed by bioterrorism and emerging infections, and the movement of animals and cargo. The quarantine stations played a new and important role in the SARS response in 2003. The recognition of their contributions has resulted in increased funding to expand the number and scope of the stations. The assessment is needed to guide the expansion. Issues to be considered include:

  1. The current role of quarantine stations as a public health intervention and how the roles should evolve to meet the needs of the 21st century.

  2. The role of other agencies and organizations working collaboratively with the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at ports of entry (including federal partners such as Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service).

  3. The role of state and local health departments as partners for public health interventions at the nation’s borders (such as activities focused on emergency preparedness and response, disease surveillance, and medical assessment and follow-up of newly arriving immigrants and refugees).

  4. Optimal locations for the quarantine stations for efficient and sufficient monitoring and response.

  5. Appropriate types of health professionals and necessary skill sets to staff a modern quarantine station.

  6. Surge capacity to respond to public health emergencies.

biosurveillance (DHS, 2004; Gerberding, 2005). Consequently, DGMQ asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to convene an expert committee to assess the present CDC quarantine stations and recommend how they should evolve to meet the challenges posed by microbial threats at the nation’s gateways.1 DGMQ specifically requested “an assessment of the role of the federal quarantine stations, given the changes in the global environment including large increases in international travel, threats posed by bioterrorism and emerging infections, and the movement of animals and cargo” (Box 1.1).

To conduct this assessment and provide recommendations, IOM convened, in October 2004, the Committee on Measures to Enhance the Effectiveness of the CDC Quarantine Station Expansion Plan for U.S. Ports of Entry. The committee’s expertise comprises clinical infectious disease, epi-

1  

Contract No. 200-2000-00629, Task Order No. 31.



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