H
Committee Biographies

Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., FACP, Chair, has been Executive Director of the American Public Health Association (APHA) since December 2002. Prior to joining APHA, Dr. Benjamin was Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing the state’s bioterrorism plan. From 1995 to 1999, he served as Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services. Dr. Benjamin has also worked extensively in the field of emergency medicine. He was Chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, WA; Chief of Emergency Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and Chairman of the Community Health and Ambulatory Care Department at the District of Columbia General Hospital. From 1990 to 1991, he served as the District of Columbia’s Commissioner of Public Health. He has taught emergency medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, DC and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a former fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Benjamin has held a variety of positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians, including President and Vice President of the DC chapter, Chairman of the Injury Control Committee, member of the Governmental Affairs Committee, and member of the Health Policy Committee. He also served as President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (2001-2002) and has sat on the editorial board of the Journal of the National Medical Association.



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Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public’s Health H Committee Biographies Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., FACP, Chair, has been Executive Director of the American Public Health Association (APHA) since December 2002. Prior to joining APHA, Dr. Benjamin was Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing the state’s bioterrorism plan. From 1995 to 1999, he served as Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services. Dr. Benjamin has also worked extensively in the field of emergency medicine. He was Chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, WA; Chief of Emergency Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and Chairman of the Community Health and Ambulatory Care Department at the District of Columbia General Hospital. From 1990 to 1991, he served as the District of Columbia’s Commissioner of Public Health. He has taught emergency medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, DC and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and a former fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Benjamin has held a variety of positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians, including President and Vice President of the DC chapter, Chairman of the Injury Control Committee, member of the Governmental Affairs Committee, and member of the Health Policy Committee. He also served as President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (2001-2002) and has sat on the editorial board of the Journal of the National Medical Association.

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Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public’s Health Barbara A. Blakeney, M.S., R.N., is President of the American Nurses Association (ANA). She is currently on leave from her role as Director of Health Services for the Homeless at the Boston Public Health Commission. Previously, she had served as the principal health nurse for homeless services and addiction services at the Division of Public Health, Department of Health and Hospitals in Boston, MA. She has held numerous ANA positions, including two terms as ANA Second Vice President and ANA First Vice President. In addition, she has been an adjunct professor in the Department of Family and Community Nursing, University of Massachusetts at Boston. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including ANA’s Pearl McIver Public Health Nurse Award for significant contributions to the field of public health on the national level. Lawrence O. Gostin, J.D., is Associate Dean for Research and Academic Programs and Professor of Law at Georgetown University, as well as Professor of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He also directs the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown Universities. In the wake of September 11, 2001, he led the drafting of the Emergency Health Powers Act to combat bioterrorism and other emerging health threats. Prior to joining the faculties at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins, he served as Executive Director of the American Society of Law, Medicine, and Ethics and as an adjunct professor at the Harvard Law School and the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1974 to 1985, Professor Gostin was the head of the National Council of Civil Liberties (United Kingdom), legal director of the National Association of Mental Health (U.K.), and a faculty member at Oxford University. He is the Health Law and Ethics Editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and author of Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint (University of California Press and the Milbank Memorial Fund, 2001) and Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader (University of California Press and the Milbank Memorial Fund, 2002), as well as of articles on international infectious disease law, ethical challenges in combating bioterrorism, and the legal ramifications of the SARS outbreak. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Margaret A. Hamburg, M.D., recently became a Senior Scientist at the Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI), Washington, DC, after serving for four years as NTI’s Vice President for Biological Programs. Prior to joining NTI, Dr. Hamburg was the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, serving as principal policy advisor to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. From 1991 to 1997, she held the position of Commissioner of Health for the City of New York. As commissioner, Dr. Hamburg’s accomplishments included the cre-

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Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public’s Health ation of the first public health bioterrorism preparedness program in the nation. Dr. Hamburg has also served in the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. She is a member of the New York Academy of Medicine and the Council on Foreign Relations and is a fellow of the American Association of the Advancement of Science and the American College of Physicians. She was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1994. Farzad Mostashari, M.D., M.S.P.H., is Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of Epidemiology Services, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, overseeing research and development of a citywide health information network of outpatient facilities, emergency rooms, 911 dispatches, and pharmacies. An innovator in nontraditional disease surveillance and outbreak detection, Dr. Mostashari was a lead investigator in the outbreaks of West Nile virus and anthrax in New York. He received his graduate training from the Harvard School of Public Health and the Yale Medical School and completed the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. He is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Public Health at Cornell Weill Medical College, a Visiting Research Scientist at the New York Academy of Medicine, and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Tufts University School of Medicine. Dr. Mostashari served as Chair of the 2002 National Syndromic Surveillance Conference and as Co-Chairperson of the 2003 and 2004 conferences. He is a member of the Advisory Committee of the National Bioterrorism Demonstration Project and of the Steering Committee of the Models of Disease Agent Study (MIDAS), NIH. William A. Petri, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., is Wade Hampton Frost Professor of Epidemiology and Chief, Division of Infectious Disease and International Health, University of Virginia (UVA), Charlottesville. He is also Professor of Medicine, Pathology, and Microbiology. Dr. Petri joined the university’s faculty in 1988 after earning both his M.D. and Ph.D. there; his doctorate is in microbiology. To pursue his interest in the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis of parasitic infection, his laboratory studies Entamoeba histolytica, a parasite that destroys host immune cells and causes approximately 50 million illnesses and 100,000 deaths annually around the world. Through complementary field studies in Bangladesh, he is investigating the human immune response to E. histolytica and identifying strain-associated differences in virulence. A past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Dr. Petri was selected by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) to serve on the Blue Ribbon Panel on Bioterrorism and its Implications for Biomedical Research in 2002. He has been a member since 2001 of the Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Research Committee at NIAID. In addition, he sat on the Infec-

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Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public’s Health tious Diseases Program Directors Committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. From 1993 to 2001, he served on the Board of Scientific Directors of the American Type Culture Collection. Dr. Petri is author or coauthor of more than 125 peer-reviewed articles, most recently “America in the World: 100 Years of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene” in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Since 1999, he has been an editor of Infection & Immunity. Arthur L. Reingold, M.D., is Professor of Epidemiology and Head of the Division of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley (UCB). He is also Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include emerging and reemerging infections in the United States and developing countries and vaccine-preventable diseases in the United States and developing countries. Dr. Reingold serves as a technical expert for the Sub-Committee on the Protection of Public Health, California State Strategic Committee on Terrorism, and as a member of the Emerging Infections Committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (of which he is a fellow). He sits on the board of editors of Epidemiology, and his recent publications include articles on syndromic surveillance and infectious disease epidemiology in the 21st century. Before joining the faculty at UCB, Dr. Reingold worked for eight years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2003. Ronald K. St. John, M.D., M.P.H., is Director General of the Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response, Public Health Agency of Canada. Created in July 2000, the Centre coordinates federal public health preparedness and response in Canada. Previously, Dr. St. John directed the Office of Special Health Initiatives at Health Canada, where he was responsible for planning, programming, and reviewing policy for quarantine and migration health, travel medicine, the Global Public Health Intelligence Network, and counterterrorism. Dr. St. John has also served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, as the deputy director of the U.S. National AIDS Program Office, and as a program coordinator for the Health Situation and Trend Assessment Program, Pan American Health Organization. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Public Health Association, the International Epidemiology Association, and the Commissioned Officers Association. Dr. St. John’s honors and awards include the Pan American Health Organization Medal for Outstanding Management and the U.S. Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal.

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Quarantine Stations at Ports of Entry: Protecting the Public’s Health Mary E. Wilson, M.D., is Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Harvard Medical School and Associate Professor of Population and International Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. For more than 20 years, Dr. Wilson was Chief of Infectious Diseases at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is particularly interested in examining how population size, location, density, mobility, vulnerability, and environmental changes influence patterns of infectious diseases. Other research interests include tuberculosis and use of vaccines, especially in travelers. She coedited the book Disease in Evolution: Global Changes and Emergence of Infectious Diseases and is author of A World Guide to Infections: Diseases, Distribution, Diagnosis. She is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Joan M. Arnoldi, D.V.M., resigned from the committee on December 21, 2004. Kathleen E. Toomey, M.D., M.P.H., resigned from the committee on March 16, 2005.