F
Workshop Speaker Biographies

Braden R. Allenby is currently Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and of Law, at Arizona State University, having moved from his previous position as the Environment, Health and Safety Vice President for AT&T in 2004. From 1995 to 1997, he was Director for Energy and Environmental Systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and from 1991 to 1992 he was the J. Herbert Holloman Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He is currently President-elect of the International Society for Industrial Ecology. Allenby has authored a number of articles and book chapters on industrial ecology and Design for Environment; and is coauthor or author of several engineering textbooks, including Industrial Ecology: Policy Framework and Implementation, published by Prentice-Hall in 1998. Allenby received his B.A. from Yale University in 1972, his J. D. from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978, his Masters in Economics from the University of Virginia in 1979, his Masters in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers University in the Spring of 1989, and his Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers in 1992.


Stanley R. Bull is currently the Associate Director for Science and Technology for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Vice President of the Midwest Research Institute, has more than 35 years of experience in energy and related applications including renewable energy, energy efficiency, transportation systems, bioenergy, medical systems, and nondestructive testing. He leads NREL’s RD&D which emphasizes renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies in support of DOE programs.



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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs F Workshop Speaker Biographies Braden R. Allenby is currently Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and of Law, at Arizona State University, having moved from his previous position as the Environment, Health and Safety Vice President for AT&T in 2004. From 1995 to 1997, he was Director for Energy and Environmental Systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and from 1991 to 1992 he was the J. Herbert Holloman Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering in Washington, D.C. He is currently President-elect of the International Society for Industrial Ecology. Allenby has authored a number of articles and book chapters on industrial ecology and Design for Environment; and is coauthor or author of several engineering textbooks, including Industrial Ecology: Policy Framework and Implementation, published by Prentice-Hall in 1998. Allenby received his B.A. from Yale University in 1972, his J. D. from the University of Virginia Law School in 1978, his Masters in Economics from the University of Virginia in 1979, his Masters in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers University in the Spring of 1989, and his Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences from Rutgers in 1992. Stanley R. Bull is currently the Associate Director for Science and Technology for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Vice President of the Midwest Research Institute, has more than 35 years of experience in energy and related applications including renewable energy, energy efficiency, transportation systems, bioenergy, medical systems, and nondestructive testing. He leads NREL’s RD&D which emphasizes renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies in support of DOE programs.

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs Bull has also held university faculty and private sector responsibilities, and has authored approximately 85 publications in diverse fields and technical journals, and presented about 103 papers at international, national, and other meetings. Professional recognition and honors include a Senior Fulbright-Hays Professorship in Grenoble, France, the Faculty-Alumni Award from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and the Secretary of Energy Outstanding Program Manager Award. Bull has a Ph.D. from Stanford University and has degrees in Chemical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Douglas C. Cameron leads molecular biology and metabolic engineering R&D in the Cargill Biotechnology Development Center (BioTDC). From 1986–1998, Cameron was a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and an affiliate in the Molecular Biology Program at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. From 1979–1981 Cameron held the position of Biochemical Engineer at Advanced Harvesting Systems, a plant biotechnology company funded by International Harvester. Cameron is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and of the Society for Industrial Microbiology (SIM). He is on the editorial board of Metabolic Engineering. Cameron served on the Minnesota Governor’s Bioscience Council and is on the board of directors of MNBIO. He is a member of the MIT Biological Engineering visiting committee and is on the managing board of the Society for Biological Engineering (SBE). Cameron has a B.S.E. in biomedical engineering in 1979 from Duke University, Durham, North Carolina and a Ph.D. in biochemical engineering in 1986 from MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Berkeley W. Cue, also known as Buzz, consults with several technology companies who serve the pharmaceutical industry to create innovative solutions for pharmaceutical science and manufacturing challenges. Most recently, at Pfizer Cue was responsible for the departments (Analytical R&D, Bio Process R&D, Chemical R&D, Pharmaceutical R&D, Regulatory CMC & Quality Assurance and Pharmaceutical Sciences Business Operations) that comprise Pharmaceutical Sciences at their Groton R&D site. He created and led Pfizer’s Green Chemistry initiative and has spoken extensively on this topic since 2000. Cue retired from Pfizer in April 2004 after almost 29 years, but he continues his mission of advancing green chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. In 2004, he gave more than a dozen presentations on green chemistry in the pharmaceutical industry. Cue received a B.A. with honors from the University of Massachusetts-Boston (1969), his Ph.D. (Organic Chemistry) from the University of Alabama (1974), and completed Postdoctoral Research at the Ohio State University (1974), National Cancer Institute Research Fellow, University of Minnesota (1975).

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs Lauren G. Heine, is Director of Applied Science, at GreenBlue. As such, she guides the development of technical tools and approaches that help organizations integrate Green Chemistry and Engineering into their product and process design and development activities—eliminating toxics and the concept of waste, and moving toward economic, environmental, and community sustainability. She was previously Director of Green Chemistry and Engineering at the Portland, OR-based, Zero Waste Alliance (ZWA) and a Fellow with the American Association for the Advancement of Science in the Green Chemistry Program of the Industrial Chemicals Branch of the U.S. EPA in Washington, D.C. Lauren earned her doctorate in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Duke University. Richard Helling has been focused intensely on economic and environmental life cycle analysis of products made from renewable resources for over 2 years, since his return from a 4-year manufacturing technology role for Dow AgroSciences in France. The majority of his 18 year career at Dow has been in process research, primarily in support of agricultural chemical manufacturing processes in California. He has worked on a wide range of classical chemical engineering technologies and management roles. His largest impacts at Dow have been in waste-reduction technology development and application, manufacturing process yield improvements and management of external manufacturing in Europe and Asia. He has a BS in Engineering (and History) from Harvey Mudd College, a M.S. in Chemical Engineering Practice from MIT, and a ScD in Chemical Engineering from MIT. He taught at MIT prior to joining Dow. He has had continued interest and research in waste elimination technology, chemical process modeling and simulation, and supercritical fluid technology since working in these fields at MIT. Mark T. Holtzapple is currently Professor of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX. From 1981 to 1985, Mark served in the U.S. Army and rose to the rank of captain. While in the Army, he performed research on water desalination and microclimate cooling, a method for cooling soldiers encapsulated in chemical protective clothing. Since joining the faculty Texas A&M in 1986, Mark has been well recognized for his excellent teaching and has won numerous teaching awards. Mark has authored nearly 100 technical articles and reports, plus a widely used engineering textbook. Further, he has over 22 issued patents, numerous pending patents, and over 80 disclosures. His research interests include fuels and chemical from biomass, food and feed processing, water desalination, air conditioning, high-efficiency engines, jet engines, and vertical-lift aircraft. In 1978, he received his B.S. in chemical

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs engineering from Cornell University. In 1981, he received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. Robert Kavlock is currently Acting Director of the National Center for Computational Toxicology. His research interests are oriented toward the development of improved hazard and risk assessment approaches for non cancer effects. Kavlock has held a variety of responsibilities for the EPA’s research program on endocrine disruptors and more recently on computational toxicology. On the national level, he was a member of the Endocrine Disruptor Working Group of the Committee on the Environment and Natural Resources with the OSTP. On the international level, he has co-organized EDC workshops with the European Union and the Japanese Ministry of the Environment, and he was a co-editor of the Global Assessment of the State-of-the-Science of Endocrine Disruptors that was published by the World Health Organization in 2001. Kavlock is active in the Society of Toxicology, where he is a past president of the Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology Specialty Section and the North Carolina Regional Chapter and he was President of the Teratology Society (2000–2001). He received his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Miami in 1977 and has been with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency since that time. Mary M. Kirchhoff is Assistant Director for Special Projects in the Education Division of the American Chemical Society, and previously served as Assistant Director of the ACS Green Chemistry Institute. She received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of New Hampshire and joined the Chemistry Department at Trinity College in Washington, D.C. upon completion of her degree. Mary spent nine years at Trinity College, where she served as Chair of the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics and Chair of the Chemistry Department. She became involved with green chemistry when she received an AAAS Environmental Fellowship to work with the U.S. EPA’s green chemistry program. She has edited two ACS publications on green chemistry education, serving as co-editor with Mary Ann Ryan on Greener Approaches to Undergraduate Chemistry Experiments, and co-editor with Kathryn Parent on Going Green: Integrating Green Chemistry into the Curriculum. William J. Koros is the Roberto C. Goizueta Chair in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Texas and spent four years with the E. I. DuPont company. In 1977, he joined the faculty of the Chemical Engineering Department at the North Carolina State University. Koros joined the faculty of the Department of

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs Chemical Engineering at UT Austin in 1984, and served as Chairman of this Department from 1993 to 1997. He has served as the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Membrane Science since 1991, and he served as the Secretary of the North American Membrane Society from 1991–2004. Koros joined the School of Chemical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology in 2001. He has published over 250 articles and holds ten U.S. Patents in the areas of sorption and transport of small molecules in membranes and barrier materials. Koros was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000, and he was named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2003. Klaus S. Lackner joined the Earth Institute at Columbia University in 2001 as the Ewing-Worzel Professor of Geophysics in the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in 1978 in theoretical physics from the University of Heidelberg, Germany. After postdoctoral positions at the California Institute of Technology and the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, he joined the Theoretical Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1983. While mostly working in research, he also held positions in the Laboratory’s senior management, among them as Acting Associate Laboratory Director for Strategic and Supporting Research representing one third of the Laboratory. Lackner is a founder of the Zero Emission Coal Alliance, an industry-led effort to develop coal power with zero emissions to the atmosphere. At present, he is developing innovative approaches to energy issues of the future focusing on environmentally acceptable technologies for the use of fossil fuels. Glenn E. Nedwin is President of Novozymes, Inc., Davis, CA, a wholly owned R&D subsidiary of Novozymes A/S, where he is responsible for all scientific, financial, and administrative functions. He is a cofounder of Novozymes, Inc. (inception 1992) and has been with the Novo family over 13 years. Nedwin received his B.S. degree from S.U.N.Y./Buffalo and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from U.C. Riverside. He did a post-doctoral fellowship in Molecular Biology at Genentech, Inc. He also holds a M.S. Degree in the Management of Technology from M.I.T. He is a co-editor of Industrial Biotechnology, a new journal with launch in 2005. Dr. Nedwin is also a member of several scientific and business associations and is on the Board of Trustees of the University of California Davis Foundation, an Advisory Board member to several U.C. Davis Departments, the Explorit! Science Center and on the Board of Directors of Air MD, Inc., an indoor air quality start-up company. Glenn is also lead guitarist with the Amplified DNA band, as well as Novozymes’ CopenDavis band. He resides in Davis, CA with his wife and identical triplet daughters.

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs Jeffrey J. Siirola is a Technology Fellow in the Eastman Research Division of Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport Tennessee where he has been for 33 years. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Utah in 1967 and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1970. His areas of interest include chemical process synthesis, computer-aided conceptual process engineering, engineering design theory and methodology, chemical process development and technology assessment, resource conservation and recovery, sustainable development and growth, artificial intelligence, non-numeric computer programming, and chemical engineering education. Siirola is an international program evaluator and past engineering accreditation commissioner for the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. He has served on numerous National Science Foundation and National Research Council panels, and on the advisory boards of several journals and chemical engineering departments. Siirola is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is the 2005 President of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.