companied by cross-disciplinary education in sustainability science and its application to the business community. This includes greater understanding of earth systems science and engineering, ecology, green chemistry, biogeochemistry, life cycle analysis, toxicology. Addressing this challenge will be critical over the next 20 years as changes in thinking are needed to make the transition to more sustainable processes, products, and systems.


Research Needed:

  • Provide professional development opportunities for educators to learn more about sustainability and how it can be advantageously incorporated into their research and teaching. This includes providing incentives for faculty to change curricula while addressing the needs of graduate students entering this complex field.

  • Persuade professional societies to integrate sustainability and green chemistry and engineering concepts into standardized testing, accreditation, and certification programs such as those developed by the ACS Committee on Professional Training or ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). This also includes developing educational materials such as lab modules, LCA modules, and new textbooks that infuse sustainability and green chemistry concepts into the core material.

  • Incorporate sustainability concepts across secondary and tertiary education curricula. This includes chemistry and chemical engineering as well as the educational practices in professional schools such as medicine, law, and business, with particular emphasis on management education and schools that educate buyers, advertisers, and designers of consumer goods.

  • Provide professional development for current and future managers and executives. Equally important is the communication of sustainability thinking to middle and upper level managers and executives in business management and incorporation of sustainability objectives in annual performance goals as well as corporate strategy.



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