B
Committee Biosketches

James A. Trainham (Chair) is vice president of science and technology for PPG Industries. Trainham joined PPG in 2005 from Invista, Inc., formerly DuPont Textiles and Interiors, where he was chief technology officer from 2002 until its divestiture from DuPont in 2004. After two years on the faculty at the University of South Carolina, Trainham joined DuPont as a research engineer in polymer products. His almost 25 years with DuPont included assignments in central research and development and in business units with responsibility for process and product technology. In 1987 he led the development of HFC-134a, the ozone safe replacement for Freon®12, then in 1992 he was appointed director of engineering research, and in 1996 global technology director for Dacron® polyester fibers and intermediates. In 1999 he assumed responsibility as global technology director, Lycra® synthetic fibers and Terathane® polyether glycols. He was then appointed global technology director, apparel and textile sciences, before the formation of DuPont Textiles and Interiors. Trainham earned bachelor and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was elected to The National Academy of Engineering in 1997, and received the Chemical Engineering Practice Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers in 2002.


Victor Atiemo-Obeng is a Scientist in the Engineering Science and Market Development (ESMD), a capability within the Corporate Research and



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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs B Committee Biosketches James A. Trainham (Chair) is vice president of science and technology for PPG Industries. Trainham joined PPG in 2005 from Invista, Inc., formerly DuPont Textiles and Interiors, where he was chief technology officer from 2002 until its divestiture from DuPont in 2004. After two years on the faculty at the University of South Carolina, Trainham joined DuPont as a research engineer in polymer products. His almost 25 years with DuPont included assignments in central research and development and in business units with responsibility for process and product technology. In 1987 he led the development of HFC-134a, the ozone safe replacement for Freon®12, then in 1992 he was appointed director of engineering research, and in 1996 global technology director for Dacron® polyester fibers and intermediates. In 1999 he assumed responsibility as global technology director, Lycra® synthetic fibers and Terathane® polyether glycols. He was then appointed global technology director, apparel and textile sciences, before the formation of DuPont Textiles and Interiors. Trainham earned bachelor and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and a master’s degree in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was elected to The National Academy of Engineering in 1997, and received the Chemical Engineering Practice Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers in 2002. Victor Atiemo-Obeng is a Scientist in the Engineering Science and Market Development (ESMD), a capability within the Corporate Research and

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs Development (CR&D) at The Dow Chemical Company (TDCC). Prior to his transfer to CR&D in 1997, Atiemo-Obeng spent 14 years in Global Process Engineering. He was lead process engineer for several multimillion-dollar capital projects that were recognized with Global Engineering Excellence Awards. He previously conducted process scale-up and modeling studies as a research engineer on various projects in the Applied Process Research and Process Development Departments in the Michigan Operations of the TDCC. Atiemo-Obeng is an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), and currently serves as the Dow Director for the AIChE Mid-Michigan Section. He was the 2003 recipient of NOBCChE’s prestigious Percy Julian Award for significant contributions in applied engineering science, the Dow Michigan Consultants Award in 1997, the 1995 Chemical Engineer of the Year for the Mid-Michigan AIChE section, and TDCC President’s Community Service Award in 1993. He received a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1975, and a bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering from The Catholic University of America, Washington DC. Michael D. Bertolucci is the president of Interface Research Corporation (IRC), chairman of the Envirosense® Consortium, Inc.—a not-for-profit organization concerned with Indoor Air Quality—and Senior Vice President of Interface, Inc. He serves on the board of the CEO Coalition to Advance Sustainable Technology (CAST). He spent six years as Vice President of Technology for Highland Industries, an industrial fabrics company, fifteen years in numerous research and development management posts with the General Electric Plastics Business Group, and four years in chemical research at Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics. He received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology, and his BS degree in Chemistry from San Jose State. Joan F. Brennecke is the Keating-Crawford Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. She joined the faculty at Notre Dame after completing her Ph.D. and M.S. degrees at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her B.S. at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research has focused on studies of supercritical fluids, including supercritical CO2 and supercritical water. Brennecke was awarded the 2001 Ipatieff Prize from the American Chemical Society in recognition of her pioneering high-pressure studies of the local structure of supercritical fluid solutions and the effect of this local structure on the rates of homogeneous reactions. Much of her current research involves ionic liquids, which are organic salts that are liquid at temperatures around ambient. These salts have received tremendous recent attention as potential substitutes for volatile organic solvents

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs since the ionic liquids are nonvolatile and, thus, cannot contribute to air pollution. In developing these solvents, Brennecke’s primary interests are in thermodynamics, phase behavior, and separations. Berkeley W. Cue, Jr. retired from Pfizer in April 2004 after almost 29 years. As vice president of Global Research and Development he was responsible for the six departments that comprise Pharmaceutical Sciences at Pfizer’s Groton R&D site. He was a member of the Worldwide Pharmaceutical Sciences Executive Team and the Groton Laboratories Leadership Team. Cue led Pfizer’s Green Chemistry initiative and has spoken extensively on this topic since 2000. He started in Pfizer in 1975 in the Animal Health Organic Chemistry Department. He transferred to the Process R&D Department of Developmental Research in 1979. He received a BA from the University of Massachusetts-Boston (1969), and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of Alabama (1974). Dr. Cue completed postdoctoral research at Ohio State University (1974) and was a National Cancer Institute Research Fellow at the University of Minnesota in 1975. In 2000 he was appointed to the Science Advisory Board at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. In 2003 he was appointed to the Green Chemistry Institute Board of Directors. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Bend Research, Inc. in Bend, Oregon. Jean De Graeve is a professor of Occupational and Environmental Toxicology at the University of Liege in Belgium. His research fields include analytical chemistry (traces identification and measurements), toxicology (drugs, occupational and environmental risk evaluation), and clinical pharmacology (drug distribution, metabolic pathway, and kinetic compartmental analysis). De Graeve is also Executive Manager of Advanced Technology Corporation since 1985 and serves as a Scientific Advisor to various public and private analytical laboratories. He is member of the Scientific Council of the Hormonology division of the Centre d’Economie Rurale of Marloie, Belgium; member of the Agreement Commission for the accreditation of Hazardous Waste companies (transport, transformation, and elimination of hazardous waste); and, member of various Scientific and Technical Commissions created by the Belgian Authorities in order to control hazardous waste installations (like cement kilns, municipal incinerators, dump sites, industries, and their impact on workers and neighbor’s health (Health consultation program), He received a B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Liege. James E. Hutchison is an associate professor of chemistry at the University of Oregon, where he also serves as director of the Materials Science Institute. Professor Hutchison received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs from Stanford University and his B.S. from the University of Oregon. He received a NSF Postdoctoral Fellowship to work on analytical and surface chemistry at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Hutchison conducts research on gold nanoparticles and self-assembled monolayers. He is also very involved in green chemistry curriculum development and recently directed the renovation of a green chemistry organic laboratory at the University of Oregon. Professor Hutchison has received several awards and honors including the Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow and the NSF CAREER Award. Andrea Larson is Associate Professor of Business Administration at the Darden School teaching in the MBA program and in Executive Education in the areas of entrepreneurship, innovation, and sustainable business. Sustainable business is a “triple bottom line” approach by corporations incorporating economic, social, and environmental performance considerations into operations and strategy. Building upon earlier research in entrepreneurship, alliances, and network organizations, her current research, teaching, and curriculum development focuses on innovation by companies engaged in sustainable business as a strategic and competitive advantage. She holds a PhD from Harvard University, awarded jointly by the Harvard Business School and the Harvard Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Pamela G. Marrone is the Chairman and Founder of AgraQuest, Inc., a firm she founded that has a portfolio of proprietary natural-product pesticide discoveries and products. Marrone has substantial management expertise in startup and multi-international biotechnology firms. Before this endeavor, Marrone was president of Entotech, a subsidiary of Novo Nordisk, and senior group leader of insect control at Monsanto Agricultural Company. She received her PhD degree in entomology from the North Carolina State University. She served on the NRC Committee on the Future Role of Pesticides in Agriculture (study published in 2000) and her company won the Presidential Green Chemistry award in 2003. Frankie Wood-Black is the Director, Business Services for Downstream Technology, ConocoPhillips. In this position, she has responsibility for those business functions—finance, business analysis, training, and assets for Downstream Technology. Prior to this position, Frankie was the Technology Services Marketing Manager for Phillips, and was responsible for in-sourcing research and development activities into the Bartlesville Technical Center. Before that she was Quality Assurance Team Leader at the Borger Refinery and NGL Center. Wood-Black began her career with ConocoPhillips in 1989 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, as a research scientist

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Sustainability in the Chemical Industry: Grand Challenges and Research Needs for research and development. At ConocoPhillips she as held the position of environmental scientist with responsibilities for regulatory compliance for air, Community-Right-to-Know, and the Toxic Substance Control Act. She was also a member of the Corporate, Health, Environment and Safety in the Property Risk Management Group, where she was the site manager for nonoperating sites. Wood-Black received a B.S. in physics with a minor in chemistry from Central State University (now the University of Central Oklahoma), Edmond, OK in 1984, a Ph.D. in physics from Oklahoma State University in 1989, and completed her MBA in Dec. 2002. She has been active in numerous professional activities and serves as the ConocoPhillips representative on Corporation Associates of the American Chemical Society. Wood-Black is a registered environmental manager.