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Committee Members Biographical Information

JAMES M. ROSSER (Chair) is president of California State University, Los Angeles, and has been professor of health care management there since 1979. Before coming to Los Angeles, he was vice chancellor and acting chancellor of the New Jersey Department of Higher Education and associate vice chancellor for academic affairs and a tenured faculty member at the University of Kansas. Dr. Rosser serves on many civic and community boards, including the Los Angeles County Alliance for College Ready Public Schools, California Chamber of Commerce, Americans for the Arts, Community Television of Southern California (KCET), Los Angeles After-School Education and Child Care Program–LA’s BEST, and Music Center Performing Arts Council/Education Council. His professional affiliations include the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, American Council on Education, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, California Council on Science and Technology, and numerous committees and commissions of the California State University system. He is a past chair of the Education and Human Resources Advisory Committee of the National Science Foundation and was chair of the National Academy of Engineering Forum on Diversity in the Engineering Workforce from 2000 to 2002. Dr. Rosser earned a B.A. and M.A. in microbiology and a Ph.D. in health education from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.


ASHOK AGRAWAL is dean of Math, Science, Engineering and Technology and director of the Emerson Center for Engineering and Manufacturing at St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley and a reg-



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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers A Committee Members Biographical Information JAMES M. ROSSER (Chair) is president of California State University, Los Angeles, and has been professor of health care management there since 1979. Before coming to Los Angeles, he was vice chancellor and acting chancellor of the New Jersey Department of Higher Education and associate vice chancellor for academic affairs and a tenured faculty member at the University of Kansas. Dr. Rosser serves on many civic and community boards, including the Los Angeles County Alliance for College Ready Public Schools, California Chamber of Commerce, Americans for the Arts, Community Television of Southern California (KCET), Los Angeles After-School Education and Child Care Program–LA’s BEST, and Music Center Performing Arts Council/Education Council. His professional affiliations include the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, American Council on Education, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, California Council on Science and Technology, and numerous committees and commissions of the California State University system. He is a past chair of the Education and Human Resources Advisory Committee of the National Science Foundation and was chair of the National Academy of Engineering Forum on Diversity in the Engineering Workforce from 2000 to 2002. Dr. Rosser earned a B.A. and M.A. in microbiology and a Ph.D. in health education from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. ASHOK AGRAWAL is dean of Math, Science, Engineering and Technology and director of the Emerson Center for Engineering and Manufacturing at St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley and a reg-

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers istered professional engineer in West Virginia. Prior to joining Florissant Valley, he was associate professor and chair of the Department of Engineering Technology at West Virginia University Institute of Technology. Mr. Agrawal is currently working toward the establishment of an advanced manufacturing center on the Florissant Valley campus. Mr. Agrawal’s efforts have led to more than $1.5 million in improvements in the manufacturing laboratories at Florissant Valley in the past two years. In addition, he recently received a partnership grant, with the University of Missouri-Rolla, from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Education Foundation to establish a 2 + 2 program in manufacturing engineering. He holds M.S. degrees in materials science and mining engineering from the University of Kentucky. From 1999 to 2001, he was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Engineering Education, and from 1998 to 1999, he was a member of the NRC Board on Engineering Education. WARREN J. BAKER has been president of California Polytechnic (Cal Poly) State University at San Luis Obispo since 1979 and is a registered engineer in four states. Prior to his appointment at Cal Poly, he was chief academic officer, vice president, Chrysler Professor, and dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Detroit. He was also a National Science Foundation visiting fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a research associate at the U.S. Air Force Civil Engineering Research Facility at the University of New Mexico. In 1985, Dr. Baker was appointed by President Reagan to the National Science Board (NSB); he was reappointed in 1988 and served in a variety of leadership positions for 9 years. He is a founding member of the California Council on Science and Technology and the California Business-Higher Education Forum; a board member of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges and chair of its Commission on Information Technologies; a member of the Business-Higher Education Forum and co-chair of its Math and Science initiative; a director of Westport Innovations Inc., and John Wiley and Sons Publishers; and a board member of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers Education Foundation. He was chair of the Board of Directors of the Civil Engineering Research Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded by the American Society of Civil Engineers to promote and fund research on the national infrastructure, U.S. competitiveness in design and construction, and the environment. Dr. Baker earned a B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Notre Dame and a Ph.D. in geotechnical engineering from the University of New Mexico. He is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Detroit Engineering Society and the author of more than 35 papers on

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers technology, distance learning, geotechnical engineering, risk analysis, and engineering education. RICHARD CULVER, the Bartle Professor in Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University, has been director of the Beta Coalition, a National Science Foundation-sponsored regional coalition of small engineering programs in central New York and Pennsylvania, and is active in research in learning theory and instructional models. He currently teaches introductory and senior-level design-project courses in engineering and works on curriculum development. As director of the Division of Engineering Design at Binghamton, he was responsible for coordinating the lower-division undergraduate program; he was also the first associate dean for academic affairs at the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science at Binghamton University. For the past 20 years, he has been the liaison between Binghamton and community colleges in New York state; for the past 3 years, he has been an external reviewer of engineering science programs at eight campuses. Dr. Culver has taught at the Colorado School of Mines, University of Calgary, Ahmadu Bello University in Nigeria, and was a visiting professor at the University of Salford, England. He is a registered professional engineer in Colorado. He earned his Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1964. DAN G. DIMITRIU is the engineering coordinator for the Physics, Engineering, and Architecture Department at San Antonio College, the largest college in the Alamo Community College District of Texas. Prior to his faculty appointment at San Antonio College in August 2001, he was a practicing engineer for 32 years in the United States and in his home country of Romania. Dr. Dimitriu has been vice president of engineering for Prism Enterprises, which manufactures consumer products and automotive and medical equipment; a senior design engineer for Kinetic Concepts Inc., a medical equipment manufacturer; and director of engineering for Dynamic Industries Inc., a construction equipment manufacturer. Dr. Dimitriu is the author or coauthor of eight patents and has written technical papers on alternative fuels and engineering education, as well as conference papers on improving community college pathways in the development of a domestic engineering workforce. He received an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest, an M.B.A. from the Academy of Economic Sciences, Bucharest, and a Ph.D. in engineering from North Dakota State University. JACK LOHMANN is associate provost at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where his principal responsibilities are the development, review,

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers and accreditation of institutional academic programs and intercampus development of campuses in Metz, Paris, Singapore, and Savannah (Georgia). Dr. Lohmann has also held appointments at the National Science Foundation, University of Michigan, University of Southern California, and École Centrale Paris. His research and teaching interests are capital budgeting and economic decision analysis, and he has headed a number of engineering-education initiatives involving accreditation and curricular innovation. External sponsors of his research and educational initiatives include AT&T, GM, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Microsoft Research, Motorola, National Science Foundation, Procter & Gamble, Sloan Foundation, and the United Engineering Foundation. He is currently editor of Journal of Engineering Education, a licensed professional engineer, and a fellow of the Institute of Industrial Engineers. Dr. Lohmann received a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from Stanford University. MARGARET WEEKS is an adjunct program manager at ABET Inc. (formerly Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology), where she is responsible for projects, workshops, conferences, and seminars in support of ABET’s promotion of quality and innovation in engineering, engineering technology, applied science, and computing education. Ms. Weeks is also associate director of the Center for Technological Literacy at Hofstra University, where she is working with community colleges and technology educators to develop professional-development programs throughout New York state. Prior to joining ABET, she was a program director with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Undergraduate Education and manager of projects in the NSF Advanced Technological Education and Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement programs. Between appointments at NSF, first from 1996 to 1998 and then from 1999 to 2001, Ms. Weeks taught courses in information and engineering technology at Charles County Community College (now the College of Southern Maryland) and was project director for a Microsoft/American Association of Community Colleges Working Connections Grant to improve information technology programs at the college. She earned an M.S. in ceramic engineering from Alfred University. AARON WENGER, Professor Emeritus at Itasca Community College in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, has been a leader in establishing links between four-year degree-granting universities and two-year engineering programs at community colleges in Minnesota. In 1999, he was featured speaker at the University of Minnesota Articulation Conference, which brought together state universities and community colleges to discuss transfer issues for engineering. Dr. Wenger has focused on the role of community colleges in recruiting and retaining a cross-section of people

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers in STEM-related careers, especially in the critical first years of a student’s exposure to higher education and the demands of the engineering curriculum. In 2002, he was co-chair (with Ron Ulseth) of a national engineering-education conference at Itasca to discuss how community colleges could act as a bridge to higher education. Based on recommendations of conference participants, Professor Wenger is working on a $5-million grant request to the National Science Foundation to create Centers for Engineering Education Dissemination, which would bring together higher educational institutions, community colleges, degree-granting universities, and professional engineers in a national discussion on practices in engineering education. He has developed pedagogical practices that stress a strong learning community and early exposure to engineering design, which have resulted in the transfer of more than 80 percent of entering freshmen to degree-granting universities. Professor Wenger received a B.S. in engineering physics and an M.S. in astrophysics from the University of Toledo. VERA ZDRAVKOVICH, vice president for instruction at Prince George’s Community College in Maryland, supervises 254 full-time and more than 500 adjunct faculty members. During her tenure, she has established a Collegian Centers and an Honors Academy; implemented a comprehensive faculty professional-development program; developed and implemented a course and general education assessment model; reorganized the divisional and departmental structure of the college; reorganized instructional technology; established a new faculty Technology Resource Center and a new department of education; initiated the development of an integrated student-centered model; and directed National Science Foundation-supported institution-wide reform. In 2001, Dr. Zdrakovich was awarded the National Council of Instructional Administrators Instructional Leadership Award. She holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from George Washington University and a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Project Liaisons STEVE DIRECTOR is the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering and a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan. He received a B.S. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and an M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1977, he joined the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University, where he became the U.A. and Helen Whitaker University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and dean of the Col-

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers lege of Engineering (until June 1996). Dr. Director is a pioneer in computer-aided design and has a long record of commitment to and innovation in electrical and computer engineering curricula. He has published more than 150 papers and is the author or coauthor of six textbooks. Dr. Director is currently chair of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Committee on Engineering Education, chair of the Board of Directors of the American Society for Engineering Education Engineering Deans Council, and has served on numerous other boards and committees and as a consultant to industry and academia. He has received many awards for his research and educational contributions, including the 1998 IEEE Education Medal and the 1999 University of California, Berkeley, Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award. Dr. Director is a fellow of IEEE and a member of NAE. KARL S. PISTER is chair of the Governing Board of the California Council on Science and Technology, former vice president for educational outreach of the University of California (UC) System, and Chancellor Emeritus of UC, Santa Cruz. He began his 50-year career in higher education as assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at UC Berkeley, where he progressed to chair of the Division of Structural Engineering and Structural Mechanics and then dean of the College of Engineering, a position he held for 10 years. From 1985 to 1990, he held the first Roy W. Carlson Chair in Engineering, and from 1991 to 1996, he was chancellor, UC Santa Cruz. Dr. Pister is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Academy of Mechanics, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and American Association for the Advancement of Science; and an honorary fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, the Center for the Future of Teaching and Learning, and the Board of Trustees of the American University of Armenia and the Monterey Institute of International Studies. Dr. Pister was founding chair of the National Research Council Board on Engineering Education. RICHARD TAPIA, Noah Harding Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics; associate director of graduate studies, Office of Research and Graduate Studies; and director of the Center for Excellence and Equity in Education at Rice University, is internationally known for his research in computational and mathematical sciences and for his leadership in education and outreach programs. He received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and is the author or coauthor of two books and more than 80 research papers. Dr. Tapia has delivered numerous addresses at national

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Enhancing the Community College Pathway to Engineering Careers and international conferences and is a member of several national advisory boards. He has received many honors, including: the 2004 American Mathematical Society Distinguished Public Service Award and an honorary doctor of engineering degree from the Colorado School of Mines. He has served as chair of the National Research Council Board on Higher Education and Workforce, co-chair of educational outreach and training activities for the University of Illinois Supercomputer Center and the San Diego Supercomputer Center, and co-chair of the Research Board for Building Engineering and Science Talent.