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Appendix

About the Contributors

PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF

Barbara Entwisle (Chair) is professor of sociology and director of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is a social demographer interested in population dynamics and demographic responses to social change, mostly in developing countries. Her projects have addressed issues related to fertility decline, family planning program evaluation, communities as contexts for individual behavior, household change and social networks, and migration, household formation and land use change. An interest in methodology pervades all of her work. Her current research utilizes innovative data from Nang Rong, Thailand, which links prospective longitudinal social survey data on households, and links between households, to information about land use and land cover extracted from a time series of satellite images. She also studies topics related to data confidentiality and the ethics of social research. She is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. She has an A.B. in sociology-anthropology from Swarthmore College and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Brown University.


Myron P. Gutmann is professor of history and director of the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan. He has broad interests in interdisciplinary historical research, especially health, population, economy, and the environment. As director of ICPSR, he is a leader in the archiving and dissemination of



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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions Appendix About the Contributors PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF Barbara Entwisle (Chair) is professor of sociology and director of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is a social demographer interested in population dynamics and demographic responses to social change, mostly in developing countries. Her projects have addressed issues related to fertility decline, family planning program evaluation, communities as contexts for individual behavior, household change and social networks, and migration, household formation and land use change. An interest in methodology pervades all of her work. Her current research utilizes innovative data from Nang Rong, Thailand, which links prospective longitudinal social survey data on households, and links between households, to information about land use and land cover extracted from a time series of satellite images. She also studies topics related to data confidentiality and the ethics of social research. She is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. She has an A.B. in sociology-anthropology from Swarthmore College and A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Brown University. Myron P. Gutmann is professor of history and director of the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) at the University of Michigan. He has broad interests in interdisciplinary historical research, especially health, population, economy, and the environment. As director of ICPSR, he is a leader in the archiving and dissemination of

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions electronic research materials related to society, population, and health. He is currently president of the Consortium of Social Science Associations and has served in the past as chair of the Social Sciences, Nursing, Epidemiology and Methods-3 Study Section of the National Institutes of Health, and as a member of the NRC’s Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change, as well as other national advisory committees and editorial boards. He has a B.A. from Columbia University (1971) and M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1976) degrees from Princeton University. Wolfgang Lutz has been the leader of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis’s Population Project since 1992. He is also adjunct professor for demography and social statistics at the University of Vienna and served as a secretary general for the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. His main interests are in population forecasting, family demography, and population-environment analysis. He has written or edited numerous books and scientific articles and book chapters. Lutz studied philosophy, mathematics, and statistics at the universities of Munich, Vienna, Helsinki, and Pennsylvania. He has a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania (1983) and a second doctorate (habilitation) from the University of Vienna (1998). Emilio F. Moran is the James H. Rudy professor of anthropology at Indiana University, professor of environmental sciences, adjunct professor of geography, director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change, and codirector of the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change. He is also lead scientist of the Land Use Cover Change (LUCC) Focus 1-Land Use Dynamics Office. His research has focused on the Amazon for the past 30 years. He is the author of numerous books, journal articles, and book chapters, and has edited several volumes. He is trained in anthropology, tropical ecology, tropical soil science, and remote sensing. He served for six years on the NRC’s Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and currently serves on its Geographical Sciences Committee. He has a Ph.D. from the University of Florida (1975). Dennis S. Ojima is a senior research scientist at the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory and an assistant professor in the Rangeland Ecosystem Science Department at Colorado State University. He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in ecosystem modeling and land use change and lectures in a number of departments, including the anthropology, atmospheric, and natural resource departments. He has edited books and authored reports and papers on diverse topics related to ecosystem science. He has a B.A. in botany from Pomona College (1975), an M.Ag. from the

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions University of Florida (1978), and a Ph.D. from the Rangeland Ecosystem Science Department at Colorado State University (1987). Steward Pickett had been on the faculty of Rutgers University until 1987, when he joined the Institute for Ecosystem Studies as a senior scientist. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and has served as vice president for science of the Ecological Society of America, on the science advisory board of the National Center for Ecological Synthesis and Analysis, and on the board of the Defenders of Wildlife. He coedited The Ecology of Patch Dynamics and Natural Disturbance (1985), Ecological Heterogeneity (1991), Humans as Components of Ecosystems (1993), and The Ecological Basis of Conservation (1997). He has a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana (1977). Peter J. Richerson is professor of environmental science and policy at the University of California, Davis. He is a member of the Animal Behavior and Ecology Graduate Groups. He serves as treasurer of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society and is a member of the NRC’s Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the theoretical and empirical study of cultural evolution and aquatic ecology. His cultural evolution work was honored with the Staley Prize of the School of American Research. He has a B.S. in entomology (1965) and a Ph.D. in zoology (1969) from the University of California, Davis. Mark R. Rosenzweig is Mohamed Kamal professor of public policy and director of the Center for International Development at Harvard University. His most recent work examines the consequences of the Indian Green Revolution for schooling attainment, household structure, and deforestation; the impact of local democratization on the distribution of public services in India; the effects of maternal schooling on children’s human capital; and the consequences of low birthweight. During 1979-1980, Rosenzweig was the director of research for the U.S. Select Commission of Immigration and Refugee Policy and he is currently coprincipal investigator for the New Immigrant Survey, the first national longitudinal survey of immigrants in the United States. Rosenzweig is editor of the Journal of Development Economics, a member of the executive committee of the American Economic Association, and a fellow of the Econometric Society. He has B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. Paul C. Stern (Study Director) is also study director of two NRC committees: the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and the Committee on Assessing Behavioral and Social Science Research on Aging.

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level, participatory processes for informing environmental decision making, and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is the coauthor or coeditor of Environmental Problems and Human Behavior (2002), The Drama of the Commons (2002), and New Tools for Environmental Protection: Education, Information, and Voluntary Measures (2002). Stern is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He has a B.A. from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University. Susan Stonich is professor of anthropology and environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research concerns the human dimensions of global change, the human and environmental consequences of economic globalization, globalization of resistance to industrial shrimp farming, tourism and conservation, community conflict and environmental justice, poverty and food security, and grassroots environmental movements. Her research has been conducted in Asia, Mexico, Latin America, and the rural United States. She has a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Kentucky. CONTRIBUTORS Li An is a research fellow at the University of Michigan. His research interests and expertise range from modeling complexity in human-environment interactions, integrating social sciences with geographic information system/ remote sensing and spatial analysis, to exploring methodology of quantitative landscape ecology. His approaches to addressing human-environment interactions are interdisciplinary and multiscale (time, space, and organization). He has published a number of papers on these areas in such journals as Science and Annals of the Association of American Geographers. He was the first recipient of Michigan State University’s Outstanding Dissertation Award for Global Studies. He has a Ph.D. in systems modeling from Michigan State University (2003). Sandra S. Batie is the first holder of the Elton R. Smith professorship in food and agricultural policy at Michigan State University. Her research area is the economics of agroenvironmental policy. Recent research projects include implementation of agroenvironmental water quality standards, the policy implications of the uncertain environmental impacts of biotechnology products, corporate environmental management strategies in the agricultural sector, and examining the influence of agricultural contractual arrangements on producers’ financial and environmental performance. She

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions does extension education, mainly with agencies and policy makers, and teaches a graduate environmental economics course. Active on commissions and boards that are related to her expertise, she is currently chair of the Board of Winrock. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Oregon State University. Scott L. Bearer is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. His research interests include the effects of timber harvesting and fuelwood collection on wildlife habitats, and he is continuing the search for a method to balance these necessary activities with endangered habitat preservation. Eduardo S. Brondízio is associate professor of anthropology, assistant director of the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change, and faculty associate with the Center for the Study of Institutions, Populations, and Environmental Change. His work has focused on sociocultural, economic, and land use change among Amazônian rural populations particularly, of caboclo and colonist populations of the Brazilian Amazon, where he has carried out long-term ethnographic research. His research integrates ethnographic methods and survey instruments, historical remote sensing, and ecological measurements aimed at spatial-temporal analysis of social and environmental processes. He has a B.A. in agronomic engineering from the Universidade de Taubaté, Ciências Agrárias, Brazil (1987) and a Ph.D. in environmental anthropology (1996) from Indiana University. Ingrid C. Burke is professor and university distinguished teaching scholar in the Department of Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship in the College of Natural Resources at Colorado State University. Her professional interests include soil organic matter dynamics, ecosystem ecology, biogeochemistry, regional modeling, and global change. Current areas of research include influence of land use practices on carbon and nitrogen cycling, interactions between regional and global scale biogeochemistry, remote sensing of fire fuel load, and the carbon and nitrogen consequences of wildland fire. Recent publications include (with coauthors) The Effect of Climate and Cultivation on Soil Organic C and N (2004) and Functional Traits of Graminoids in Semi-Arid Steppes: A Test of Grazing Histories (2004). She has a B.S in biology from Middleburg College and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of Wyoming. Aphichat Chamratrithirong is associate professor at the Institute of Population and Social Research (IPSR) at Mahidol University in Thailand. He is a social demographer interested in population change in the context of social

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions and economic development. His published work focuses on fertility decline, contraceptive choice, family arrangements, and migration. He has played a key role in the design, implementation, and analysis of population surveys in Thailand, including Thailandís National Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys, the National Migration Survey, and the Nang Rong longitudinal surveys. Chamratrithirong was director of IPSR from 1988 to 1996 and advisor on Population Census and Survey Data Analysis for the Country Technical Services Team for East and South-East Asia of the United National Population Fund. He received a B.A. in political science from Chulalongkorn University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Brown University. Xiaodong Chen is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. His research interests include integrating socioeconomics with ecology, spatial pattern analysis in plant ecology, and applying geographic information systems and remote sensing in natural resources management. Geoff Cunfer is associate professor in the Center for Rural and Regional Studies at Southwest Minnesota State University. He teaches environmental history, rural and regional studies, and geographical information systems. Previously he was assistant professor at Southwest Minnesota, and prior to that he was an assistant instructor at the University of Texas. One of his current research projects explores the historical connection between people, land use, and natural systems in an agricultural setting. He received the Social Science History Association’s 2003 President’s Book Award, for the best unpublished manuscript by a beginning scholar, published as On the Great Plains: Agriculture and Environment (2005). He has an M.A. from Texas Tech University and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas, both in environmental history. Günther Fischer is a research scholar in the Food and Agriculture Program at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA). Previously he was part of IIASA’s Computer Sciences Group. He participated in the formulation of a general equilibrium framework and the implementation and application of a global model of the world food systems, known as IIASA’s Basic Linked System. He was a major contributor to two studies, one on the welfare implications of trade liberalization in agriculture (Towards Free Trade in Agriculture, 1988) and one on poverty and hunger (Hunger: Beyond the Reach of the Invisible Hand, 1991). He participated in a multinational research project on climate change and world agriculture. He was coauthor of a major study on Potential Population Supporting Capacity of Lands in the Developing World (1983). Since 1987, he has

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions coordinated the joint efforts of a worldwide network of collaborating institutions, the Food and Agriculture Network, which shares common interests in the development and use of tools for national and international policy analysis. Andrew Foster is professor and chair of the Department of Economics and professor of community health at Brown University. He is an empirical microeconomist whose research considers issues in labor, population, development, health, and the environment. Previously he was associate professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Pennsylvania. He received the Dorothy Thomas Award from the Population Association of America in 1987 and a fellowship with the Population Council in 1986, among many other fellowships, scholarships, and honors. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley (1988). Debbie L. Fugate is a Ph.D. candidate in the joint doctoral program in geography at San Diego State University and the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation research focuses on the development of geodemographic models for estimating the size, distribution, and characteristics of data poor populations using remote sensing and geographic information systems. Richard E. Groop is professor and chair of the Department of Geography and former director of the Center for Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Science at Michigan State University. He has published numerous research articles and book chapters and contributed to a number of atlases, including the Digital Atlas of Michigan. His research interests include internal migration within the United States, computer cartography, and human applications of geographic information systems. He has a B.S.Ed. (1965) and an M.A. in geography from Bowling Green State University (1967) and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Kansas (1976). Guangming He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. His research interests include the integration and application of web-based geographic information systems, remote sensing, system modeling, and decision support systems in natural resource management. Dennis P. Larson is a senior GIS (geographic information systems) technician with the San Diego Association of Governments and its chartered consulting agency, SouthPoint. He manages short-term GIS projects for member agencies and contributes to detailed research studies, examining the demographics and economics of local jurisdictions, growth manage-

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions ment policies, and regional marketing strategies. His research interests include the use of spatial statistics in urban economics, the role of GIS in public policy, and the analysis of community and economic development strategies. Zai Liang is associate professor of sociology at the State University of New York at Albany. He serves as chair-elect of the Asia and Asian American Section of the American Sociological Association and codirector of Urban China Research Network based at Albany. His major research interests are in internal and international migration. He recently finished a project on market transition and internal migration in China. His current research projects include a major study of international migration from China’s Fujian Province to the United States and an examination of the social and health consequences of internal migration in China. He has a B.Sc. in mathematics from Jilin University, China (1983) and M.A. (1988) and Ph.D. (1992) degrees in sociology from the University of Chicago. Marc A. Linderman is a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Geography at the University of Louvain in Belgium. His research interests include remote sensing, geographic information systems, landscape modeling, and human impacts on wildlife habitat. He has coauthored several journal articles, including “Ecological Degradation in Protected Areas: The Case of Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas,” published in Science. He has a Ph.D. from Michigan State University. Jianguo (Jack) Liu is the Rachel Carson chair in ecological sustainability in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife and Director of the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability at Michigan State University. His research interests include conservation ecology, landscape ecology, and human-environment interactions. He is interested in integrating ecology with socioeconomics as well as human demography and behavior. He has served on various committees and panels and is currently on editorial boards of six journals. He has received the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award, the Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellowship of the Ecological Society of America, and Michigan State University’s Teacher-Scholar Award. Amy Lynd Luers is a climate impacts scientist for the Global Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists in Berkeley, California. Her research has focused on assessing vulnerability of agricultural farmers and coastal communities in northern Mexico to global environmental changes. Her current research explores climate change impacts in California. She has an M.A. in international policy studies and a Ph.D. in environmental science from Stanford University.

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions Pamela Matson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman professor in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences and the Stanford Institute of International Studies and the Naramore dean of the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a MacArthur fellow, and cochair of the National Academies’ Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. Her research focuses on land use changes and their effects on biogeochemical cycling and trace gas exchange in tropical forests and agricultural systems. Ongoing interests include integrated analyses of sustainable resource use and vulnerability of human-environment systems to environmental and policy changes. She has a B.S. in biology from the University of Wisconsin (1975), an M.S. in environmental science from Indiana University (1980), and a Ph.D. in forest ecology from Oregon State University (1983). Angela G. Mertig is associate professor of sociology in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Middle Tennessee State University. Previously at Michigan State University, she has worked extensively with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division in researching the human dimensions of wildlife management. She specializes in sociological research methodology and statistics, social movements, especially the environmental movement, and in the study of public opinion and attitudes regarding the natural environment. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Washington State University (1995). Rosamond L. Naylor is the Julie Wrigley senior fellow at the Center for Environmental Science and Policy at Stanford University. Her research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production. She has been involved in a number of field-level research projects throughout the world concerning issues of high-input agricultural production, biotechnology, climate-induced yield variability, aquaculture production, and food security. She was named a fellow in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program in Environmental Sciences in 1999 and a Pew fellow in conservation and the environment in 1994, and she serves on the oversight committee for the McKnight Foundation’s Collaborative Crop Research Program. She has a B.A. in economics and environmental studies from the University of Colorado, an M.Sc. in economics from the London School of Economics, and a Ph.D. in applied economics from Stanford University. Brian C. O’Neill is a research scholar in the Greenhouse Gas Initiative and in the World Population Project at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria. He is currently on partial leave of absence from the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown University. His research focuses on population-environment interactions and the sci-

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions ence and policy of global climate change. In 2004 he received the European Young Investigator Award for research on demography and climate change. He has a Ph.D. in earth systems science from New York University. J. Ivan Ortiz-Monasterio is a senior scientist in the intensive agroecosystems program at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center and consulting professor at Stanford University. He is a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences as well as the National Academy of Agricultural Sciences. He has been working on ways to improve nutrient use efficiency in wheat-based cropping systems, looking at crop management as well as breeding approaches. He is also currently serving as wheat crop leader of the Consultative Group in International Agriculture Research Biofortification Challenge Program. He has a B.S. from the Monterrey Institute of Technology in Mexico and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Zhiyun Ouyang is professor and director of the Key Lab of Systems Ecology and associate director of the Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences in the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests include ecosystem services, ecosystem assessment, and ecological planning, biodiversity conservation, as well as applications of geographic information systems in ecology and environmental sciences. William J. Parton is a senior research scientist and professor of rangeland and ecosystem science at the Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory at Colorado State University. His major research interests include ecosystem modeling, nutrient cycling, and trace gas fluxes. Previously, he was the director of the Ecosystem Studies Program in the Division of Biotic Systems and Resources at the National Science Foundation. He is a member of the Ecological Society of America. He has authored or coauthored numerous reports, papers, and articles, including Modeling Soil Organic-Matter in Organic-Amended and Nitrogen-Fertilized Long-Term Plots (2002), and Regional and Temporal Variability in Aboveground Net Primary Productivity and Net N Mineralization in Grasslands (2002). He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma. Pramote Prasartkul is professor at the Institute of Population and Social Research (IPSR) at Mahidol Univeresity in Thailand. He is a social demographer interested in population dynamics, with particular reference to the population of Thailand. Dr. Prasartkul is the author of the major demography textbook used in graduate level training in Thailand. He has published descriptions of the age-sex structure of the Thai population, assessments of trends in survival curves, generation life tables for five-year

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions cohorts, and population projections for the country. He is now leading a study to develop verbal autopsy as a tool to identify causes of death as part of a larger ongoing longitudinal study based in Kanchanaburi, Thailand. He has played a key role in the design, implementation, and analysis of the Nang Rong longitudinal surveys. Dr. Prasartkul is president of the Population Association of Thailand. He received a B.A. in political science from Chulalongkorn University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Cornell University. Jiaguo Qi is associate professor in the Department of Geography and the Center for Global Change and Earth Observations at Michigan State University. His primary research areas include theoretical development and applications of remote sensing technologies to study the dynamics of the earth system and their environmental impacts at variable spatial and temporal scales. His specific research interests focus on quantitative assessment of ecosystems health and their biophysical attributes, such as forest density, fragmentation, rangeland productivity, degradation, and spatial patterns of land use and land cover dynamics. He has a B.S. in physics from Harbin Teacher’s Normal University in China (1981) and M.S. (1989) and Ph.D. (1993) degrees in water and environmental sciences from the University of Arizona. Charles L. Redman is professor in the Department of Anthropology and director of the Center for Environmental Studies at Arizona State University. Previously, he taught at New York University and at the State University of New York-Binghamton. Redman’s interests include human impacts on the environment, historical ecology, the rise of civilization, archaeological research design, and environmental education and public outreach. The author or coauthor of numerous books, including Explanation in Archaeology, The Rise of Civilization, People of the Tonto Rim and, most recently, Human Impact on Ancient Environments, he has directed archaeological field projects in the Near East, North Africa, and Arizona. He is a founding member of the Southwest Center for Education and the Natural Environment, a member of the board of trustees of the Museum of Northern Arizona, as well as the Arizona chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and a member of the science advisory committee of Biosphere 2 and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. He has a B.A. from Harvard University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from the University of Chicago. Ronald R. Rindfuss is the Robert Paul Ziff distinguished professor of sociology and fellow of the Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Together with colleagues at Mahidol University and the University of North Carolina, he has been actively researching popula-

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions tion and environment issues in Nang Rong district in northeast Thailand. Other research interests include family and fertility behavior in developed countries. He is a past president of the Population Association of America and a current member of the Science Steering Committee of the Land Use Cover and Change Program, the International Human Dimensions Program and the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program. He has a B.A. in sociology from Fordham University and a Ph.D. in sociology from Princeton University. Karen C. Seto is assistant professor in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences in the School of Earth Sciences and a Fellow in the Center for Environmental Science and Policy at the Stanford Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. Her research focuses on monitoring urban growth trajectories, understanding the causes of land use change, and evaluating the social and ecological impacts of land use dynamics. She is particularly interested in the spatiotemporal patterns and social interactions at the agriculture-urban land use interface. She is on the scientific steering committees of the International Human Dimensions Programme’s project on urbanization and global environmental change, and the World Conservation Union’s Commission on Ecosystem Management. She has a B.A. in political science from the University of California, Santa Barbara, an M.A. in international relations, resources, and environmental management from Boston University, and a Ph.D. in geography from Boston University. Leah K. VanWey is assistant professor of sociology at Indiana University and is a faculty fellow at the Anthropological Center for Training and Research on Global Environmental Change and at the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population and Environmental Change. She is a social demographer with research interests in household demography, migration, and population and environment relationships in Brazil, Mexico, and Thailand. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Stephen J. Walsh is professor of geography, director of the Landscape Characterization and Spatial Analysis, and research fellow of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Previously he was the Amos H. Hawley professor of geography and organizer and director of the Spatial Analysis Unit at the Carolina Population Center. He is on the editorial boards of Plant Ecology and the Journal of Geography. He has coedited a series of books: GIS and Remote Sensing Applications in Biogeography and Ecology (2001), Linking People, Place, and Policy: A GIScience Approach (2002), and People and the Environment:

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Population, Land Use, and Environment: Research Directions Approaches for Linking Household and Community Surveys to Remote Sensing and GIS (2003). Specific research foci are on pattern and process at the alpine treeline ecotone, biocomplexity, scale dependence and information scaling, land use and land cover dynamics, spatial simulations and change modeling, health care delivery, and population-environment interactions. He has M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in resource and physical geography from Oregon State University. John R. Weeks is professor of geography and director of the International Population Center at San Diego State University. His research focuses on the application of remote sensing, spatial analysis, and geographic information system techniques to demographic phenomena. He is currently directing a project analyzing Arab fertility transitions, and another analyzing intraurban health in Accra, Ghana. His textbook, Population: An Introduction to Concept and Issues, is now in its ninth edition and has been the bestselling text in the field since the first edition appeared in 1978. He has a B.A. in sociology (1966) and M.A. (1969) and Ph.D. (1972) degrees in demography, all from the University of California, Berkeley. Hemin Zhang is director of the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda, Wolong Nature Reserve. He is senior author of a recent book (in Chinese) entitled Reproductive Studies of the Giant Panda. He has an M.A. in wildlife management from Idaho State University. Shiqiang Zhou is a research scientist in the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda, Wolong Nature Reserve. He is interested in the study of panda habitats, bamboo ecology, and socioeconomic issues.

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