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APPENDIX B Selected Organizations Related to Laboratory Animal Science American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC), 11300 Rockville Pike, Suite 1211, Rockville, MD 20852-3035 (phone: 301-231-5353; fax: 301-231-8282; e-mail: accredit@aaalac.org). This nonprofit organization was formed in 1965 by leading U.S. scientific and educational organizations to promote high-quality animal care, use, and well- being and to enhance life-sciences research and education through a voluntary accreditation program. Any institution maintaining, using, importing, or breeding laboratory animals for scientific purposes is eligible to apply for AAALAC am- creditation. The animal-care facilities of applicant institutions are visited and the program of animal care and use thoroughly evaluated by experts in laboratory animal science, who submit a detailed report to the Council on Accreditation. The council reviews applications and site-visit reports, using guidelines in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, to determine whether full accredi- tation should be awarded. Accredited institutions are required to submit annual reports on the status of their animal facilities, and site revisits are conducted aim intervals of 3 years or less. The Council on Accreditation reviews the annual and site-revisit reports to determine whether full accreditation should continue. Fully accredited animal-care facilities receive a certificate of accreditation and are included on a list of such facilities published by the association. Many private biomedical organization strongly recommend that all grantees be sup- ported by an AAALAC-accredited animal program. Full accreditation by AAALAC is accepted by the Office for Protection from Research Risks of the 102

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS 103 National institutes of Health as strong evidence that the animal facilities are in compliance with Public Health Service policy. American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (AALAS), 70 Timber Creek Drive, Suite 5, Cordova, TN 38018 (phone: 901-754-8620; fax: 901-753- 0046; e-mail: info@aalas.org; URL: http://www.aalas.org/). AALAS is a professional, nonprofit organization of persons and institutions concerned with the production, care, and study of animals used in biomedical research. The organization provides a medium for the exchange of scientific information on all phases of laboratory animal care and use through its educa- tional activities and certification. AALAS is dedicated to advancing and dissemi- nating knowledge about the responsible care and use of laboratory animals for the benefit of human and animal life. AALAS publishes Laboratory Animal Science (bimonthly journal), Contemporary Topics (bimonthly journal), training manuals for laboratory animal technicians, an annual membership directory, a directory of certified technologists, and occasional pamphlets on special subjects. AALAS answers inquiries: conducts certification program for laboratory animal techni- cians. conducts annual scientific sessions at which original papers are presented, with seminars and workshops on laboratory animal science; distributes publica- tions; lends film and slide sets; and makes referrals to other sources of informa- tion. Services are available to anyone. American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine (ACLAM), Dr. Charles W. McPherson, Executive Director, 200 Summerwinds Drive, Cary, NC 27511 (phone: 919-859-5985; fax: 919-851-3126). ACLAM is a specialty board recognized by the American Veterinary Medi- cal Association (AVMA). it was founded in 1957 to encourage education, train- ing, and research; to establish standards of training and experience for qualifica- tion; and to certify, by examination, qualified laboratory animal specialists as diplomates. To achieve these goals, the college seeks to interest veterinarians in furthering both training and qualifications in laboratory animal medicine. The annual ACLAM Forum is a major continuing-education meeting. ACLAM also meets and sponsors programs in conjunction with the annual meet- ings of AVMA and the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science. It emphasizes and sponsors continuing-education programs; cosponsors symposia; cosponsors about 30 autotutorial programs on use, husbandry, and diseases of animals commonly used in research; and has produced 14 volumes on laboratory subjects, such as The Laboratory Rat and The Mouse in Biomedical Research. American Humane Association (AHA), 236 Massachusetts Avenue, NE, Suite 203, Washington, D.C. 20002 (phone: 202-543-7780; fax: 202-546-3266).

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104 APPENDL~B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS AHA is a professional, nonprofit organization of organizations and individu- als concerned with the exploitation, abuse, and neglect of children and animals. AHA was founded in 1877 and was the first national organization to protect children and animals. AHA supports the 3 R's in biomedical research: refinement, reduction, and replacement where possible. AHA informs its members of issues in biomedical research through its magazine, Advocate, which is published quarterly. American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners (ASLAP), Dr. Bradford S. Goodwin, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer, University of Texas, Medical School- CLAMC, 6431 Fannin Street, Room 1132, Houston, TX 77030-1501 (phone: 713-792-5127; fax: 713-794-4177). ASLAP, founded in 1966, is open to any graduate of a veterinary college accredited or recognized by the American Veterinaty Medical Association (AVMA) or Canadian Veterinaty Medical Association (CVMA) who is engaged in laboratory animal practice and maintains membership in AVMA, CVMA, or any other national veterinary medical association recognized by AVMA. Its pur- pose is to disseminate ideas, experiences, and knowledge among veterinarians engaged in laboratory animal practice through education, training, and research at both predoctoral and postdoctoral levels. Two educational meetings are held annually, one each in conjunction with the annual meetings of AVMA and the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science. American Society of Primatologists (ASP), Regional Primate Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (URL: http://www.asp.org). The purposes of ASP are exclusively educational and scientificspecifi- cally, to promote and encourage the discovery and exchange of information regarding pnmates, including all aspects of their anatomy, behavior, develop- ment, ecology, evolution, genetics, nutrition, physiology, reproduction, system- atic, conservation, husbandry, and use in biomedical research. The ASP holds an annual meeting, sponsors the American Journal of Primatology, and publishes the ASP Bulletin quarterly. Any person engaged in scientific pnmatology or interested in supporting the goals of the society may apply for membership. Membership and information about the International Primatological Society can be obtained from ASP. American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), 1931 North Meacham Road, Suite 100, Schaumburg, IL 60173-4360 (phone: 800-248-2862; fax: 708- 925-1329; URL: http://www.avma.org/). AVMA is the major national organization of veterinarians. Its objective is to

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS 105 advance the science and art of veterinary medicine, including its relationship to public health and agriculture. AVMA is the recognized accrediting agency for schools and colleges of veterinary medicine. It promotes specialization in veten- nary medicine through the formal recognition of specialty-certifying organiza- tions, including the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. The AVMA Committee on Animal Technician Activities and Training accredits 2- year programs in animal technology at institutions of higher learning throughout the United States. A list of accredited programs and a summary of individual state laws and regulations relative to veterinarians and animal technicians are available from AVMA. Animal Welfare Information Center (AWIC), National Agncultural Library, 5th floor, Beltsville, MD 20705-2351 (phone: 301 -504-6212; fax: 301 -507125; e-mail: awic(3:nal.usda.gov; URL: http://netvet.wustl.edu/awic.htm or http:// www.nalusda.gov). AWIC, at the National Agricultural Library, was established by the 1985 amendments to the Animal Welfare Act. It provides information on employee training, improved methods of experimentation (including alternatives), and ani- mal-care and animal-use topics through the production of bibliographies, work- shops, resource guides, and The Anirnal Welfare Information Center Newsletter. AWIC services are geared toward those who must comply with the Animal Welfare Act, such as researchers, veterinarians, exhibitors, and dealers. Publica- tions and additional information are available from AWIC. Animal Welfare Institute (AWI), P.O. Box 3650, Washington, DC 20007 (phone: 202-337-2332; fax: 202-338-9478; e-mail: awi@igc.apc.org). AWI is a nonprofit educational org~izabon dedicated to reducing the pain and fear inflicted on animals by humans. Since its founding in 1951, AWI has promoted humane treatment of laboratory animals, emphasizing the importance of socialization, exercise, and environmental enhancement. The institute supports the "3 R's": replacement of experimental animals with alternatives, refinement to reduce animal pain and suffering, and reduction in the numbers of animals used. Educational material published by AWI includes the AWI Quarterly, Comfort- able Quarters for Laboratory Animals, Beyond the Laboratory Door, and Ani- mals and Their Legal Rights and is available free to scientific institutions and libraries and at cost to others. The institute welcomes correspondence and discus- sion with scientists, technicians, and IACUC members on improving the lives of laboratory animals. Association of Primate Veterinarians (APV), Dr. Dan Dalgard, Secretary,

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106 APPENDLY B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS Corning Hazleton, 9200 Leesburg Turnpike, Vienna, VA 22162-1699 (phone: 703-893-5400 ext. 5390, fax: 703-759-6947). APV is a nonprofit organization whose missions are to promote the dissemi- nation of information related to the health, care, and welfare of nonhuman pri- mates and to provide a mechanism by which primate veterinarians can speak collectively on matters regarding nonhuman primates. The organization devel- oped after an initial workshop on the clinical care of nonhuman primates held in 1973 at the National institutes of Health. Six years later, bylaws were adopted to formalize the missions and operation of the group. Members of APV are veteri- narians who are concerned with the health, care, and welfare of nonhuman pri- mates. The association meets annually, publishes a quarterly newsletter, and contributes to other scholarly and regulatory efforts and issues concerning non- human primates. Australia and New Zealand Council for the Care of Animals in Research and Teaching (ANZCCART): ANZCCART Australia, The Executive Officer, PO Box 19, Glen Osmond. South Australia 5064, (phone: +61-8-303-7393; fax: +61-8-303-7113; e-mail: anzccart@waite.adelaide.edu.au; URL: http://www. adelaide.edu.au/ANZCCART/); ANZCCART New Zealand, The Executive Of- ficer, C/- The Royal Society of New Zealand, PO Box 598, Wellington, New Zealand (phone: +64-4-472 7421; fax: +64-4-473 1841; e-mail: anzccart@ rsnz. govt.nz; URL: http :llwww. adelai de. edu. au/ANZCCARTf). ANZCCART was established in 1987 in response to concerns in both the scientific and the wider communities about the use of animals in research and teaching. ANZCCART is an independent body that has been developed to pro- vide a national focus for these issues. Through its varied activities, ANZCCART seeks to promote effective communication and cooperation between all those concerned with the care and use of animals in research and teaching. ANZCCART's missions are to promote excellence in the care of animals used in research and teaching and thereby minimize their discomfort, to ensure that the outcomes of the scientific uses of animals are worthwhile, and to foster informed and responsible discussion and debate within the scientific and wider communi- ties regarding the scientific uses of animals. Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Medicine/L'Association canadienne de la medecine des animaux de laboratoire (CALAM/ACMAL), Dr. Brenda Cross, Secretary-Treasurer, 102 Animal Resources Centre, 120 Main- tenance Road, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Canada S7N SC4. CALAM/ACMAL is a national organization of veterinarians with an interest

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORG 1 VIZATIONS 107 in laboratory animal medicine. The association's missions are to advise interested parties on all matters pertaining to laboratory animal medicine, to further the education of its members, and to promote ethics and professionalism in the field. The association is committed to the provision of appropriate veterinary care for all animals used in research, teaching, or testing. The association publishes a newsletter, Interface, four times a year. Canadian Association for Laboratory Animal Science/L'association canadienne pour la technologie des animeaux laboratoire (CALAS/ACTAL), Dr. Donald McKay, Executive Secretary, CW401 Biological Science Building, Bioscience Animal Service, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2E9 (phone: 403-492-5193; fax: 403-492-7257; e-mail: dmckay @gpu.srv.ualberta.ca). CALAS/ACTAL is composed of a multidisciplinary group of people and institutions concerned with the care and use of laboratory animals in research, teaching, and testing. The aims of the association are to advance the knowledge, skills, and status of those who care for and use laboratory animals; to improve the standards of animal care and research; and to provide a forum for the exchange and dissemination of knowledge regarding animal care and research. CALAS/ ACTAL maintains a Registry for Laboratory Animal Technicians, publishes a newsletter six times a year, and hosts an annual national convention. Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC), Constitution Square, Tower II, 315-350 Albert, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada KIR lB1 (phone: 613-238-4031; fax: 613-238-2837; e-mail: ccac@carleton.ca). CCAC, founded in 1968 under the aegis of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, became an independently incorporated, autonomous organization in 1982. Through its development of guidelines, assessment visits, and educational/consultation programs, the CCAC is the main advisory and re- view agency for the use of animals in Canadian science. Compliance with CCAC guidelines. published in two volumes, is a requirement for the receipt of grants or contracts. CCAC is currently funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada, the Medical Research Council of Canada, and some federal departments. Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT), Johns Hopkins Univer- sity, 111 Market Place, Suite 840, Baltimore, MD 21202-6709 (phone: 410-223- 1693; fax: 410-223-1603; e-mail: caat@jhuhyg.sphjhu.edu; URL: http:l/ infonet.welch jhu.edu/~caat/). CAAT was founded in 1981 to develop alternatives to the use of whole

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108 APPENDLY B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS animals for product development and safety testing. Although CAAT's mission focuses primarily on the development of alternatives for testing, the center also works with organizations seeking to implement the 3 R's in research and educa- tion. These organizations are throughout the world, primarily in North America, Europe, Australia, and Japan. CAAT is an academic research center based in the School of Hygiene and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, whose programs encom- pass laboratory research, education/information, and validation of alternative methods. CAAT's primary outreach to scientific and lay audiences its newsletter, which is published three times a year. A newsletter for middle-school students, CAATALYST, is published three times a year. Center for Animals and Public Policy, Tufts University, School of Vetennary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, N. Grafton, MA 01536 (phone: 508-839-7991; fax: 508-839-2953; e-mail: dpease@opal.tufts.edu). The center is a unit of Tufts School of Veterinary Medicine that deals with all aspects of human-animal interactions. The center publishes two newsletters (The Animal Policy Report, quarterly; The Alternatives Report, bimonthly) and other reports and related items, including The Animal Research Controversy, a 200- page report that includes an appendix on the animal-protection movement. The center also has established an MS program in animals and public policy, a l-year program directed at persons with a graduate degree or equivalent life experience. Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR), 818 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 303, Washington, DC 20006 (phone: 202-457-0654; fax 202-457-0659; e- mail: nabr-fbr@access.digex.net; URL: http://www.fiesta.com/fbr). FBR is a nonprofit, educational organization dedicated to promoting public understanding and support of the ethical use of animals in medical research. The Foundation has a wide range of educational materials available for students as well as the general public, including brochures, booklets, videotapes, speaker's hits, posters, and is a source of information on education and training materials related to laboratory animal science. FRB hosts press events and assists members of the media in locating researchers to address issues regarding animal research. The Humane Society of the United States (HSIUS), 2100 L Street, NW, Wash- ington, DC 20037 (phone: 202-452-1100; fax: 301-258-3082; e-mail: HSUSLAB @ix.netcom.com). HSUS is the nation's largest animal-protection organization. The society is active on a wide variety of humane issues, including those affecting wildlife,

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGANIZA TIONS 109 companion animals, and animals in laboratories and on farms. HSUS publishes a quarterly magazine (The HSUS News), a newsletter (The Animal Activist Alert), and a variety of reports, brochures, and other advocacy materials. The society works actively on issues involving the use of animals in research, safety testing, and education. This work is spearheaded by the HSUS Animal Research Issues Section, with the aid of a Scientific Advisory Council. The aims of this research are to promote the 3 R's of replacement, reduction, and refinement; strong regu- lations and their enforcement; openness and accountability among research insti- tutions; and an end to egregious mistreatment of animals. HSUS pursues these aims through educational, legislative, legal, and investigative means. Staff are available to give presentations and write articles on these topics. Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR), National Research Coun- cil, National Academy of Sciences, 2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418 (phone: 202-334-2590; fax: 202-334-1687; e-mail: ILAR@nas.edu; ILAR Journal e-mail: ILARJ@nas.edu; URL: http://www2.nas.edu/ilarhome). ILAR develops guidelines and disseminates infommation on the scientific, technologic, and ethical use of animals and related biologic resources in research, testing, and education. ILAR promotes high-quality, humane care of animals and the appropriate use of animals and alternatives. ILAR functions within the mis- sion of the National Academy of Sciences as an adviser to the federal govem- ment, the biomedical research community, and the public. ILAR Journal is pub- lished quarterly and is distributed to scientists, biomedical administrators, medical libraries, and students. International Council for Laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS), Dr. Steven Pakes, Secretary General, Division of Comparative Medicine, University of Texas Southwestenn Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX (phone: 214-648-3340; fax: 214-648-2659; e-mail: spakes@mednet.swmed.edu). ICLAS is an international nongovernment scientific organization that was founded in 1961 under the auspices of UNESCO and several scientific unions. The aims of ICLAS are to promote and coordinate the development of laboratory animal science throughout the world, to promote international collaboration in laboratory animal science, to promote the definition and monitoring of quality laboratory animals, to collect and disseminate infommation on laboratory animal science, and to promote the humane use of animals in research, testing, and teaching through recognition of ethical principles and scientific responsibilities. ICLAS has programs addressing microbiologic and genetic monitoring and standardization, assisting developing countries in pursuing their objectives in improving the care and use of laboratory animals, and improving education and training in laboratory animal science. ICLAS accomplishes its goals through

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110 APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGA.WZi TIONS regional scientific meetings, an international scientific meeting held every 4 years, the dissemination of information, and expert consultation with those requesting assistance. ICLAS membership is composed of national members, scientific union mem- bers, scientific members, and associate members. The Governing Board is re- sponsible for implementing the general policy of ICLAS and is elected by the General Assembly every 4 years. Laboratory Animal Management Association (LAMA), Mr. Paul Schwikert, Past-President. P.O. Box 1744, Silver Spring, MD 20915 (phone: 313-577-1418; fax: 313-577-5890). LAMA is a nonprofit educational organization. Membership includes indi- viduals and institutions involved in laboratory animal management, medicine, and science. The mission of the association, founded in 1984, is to "enhance the quality of management and care of laboratory animals throughout the world." The objectives of LAMA include promoting the dissemination of ideas. expen- ences, and knowledge in the management of laboratory animals, encouraging continued education, acting as a spokesperson for the field of laboratory animal management, and assisting in the training of managers. The organization con- ducts a midyear forum on management issues and topics of interest to the general membership and an annual meeting in conjunction with the American Associa- tion of Laboratory Animals Science national meeting. LAMA Review is a quar- terly journal on management issues published by the organization, and LAMA Lines is a bimonthly newsletter on topics of general interest to the membership. Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals/American Humane Education Society (MSPCA/AHES), 350 South Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02130 (phone: 617-522-7400; fax: 617-522-4885). The Center for Laboratory Animal Welfare at MSPCA/AHES was formed in 1992 to bring thoughtful analysis to the complex issues surrounding the use of animals in research, testing, and education. Its work involves researching issues related to the welfare of laboratory animals, creating educational materials, and developing programs on issues of interest to the public. Founded in 1868, MSPCA/AHES is one of the largest animal-protection organizations in the world. It operates three animal hospitals, seven animal shel- ters, and a statewide law-enforcement program in Massachusetts. It is widely recognized for national leadership in humane education, publications, legislative issues, and veterinary medicine.

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS 111 National Association for Biomedical Research (NABR), 818 Connecticut Av- enue, NW, Suite 303, Washington, DC 20006 (phone: 202-857-0540; fax 202- 659-1902; e-mail: nabr-fbr@access.digex.net; URL: http://www.fiesta.com/nabr). NABR is a nonprofit organization of 350 institutional members from both academia and industry whose mission is to advocate public policy that recognizes the vital role of laboratory animals in research, education, and safety testing. NABR is a source of information concerning existing and proposed animal wel- fare legislation and regulations at the national, state, and local level. Office for Protection from Research Risks (OPRR), National institutes of Health, 6100 Executive Blvd., Suite 3BOI, Rockville, MD 20892 (phone: 301- 496-7163; fax: 301-402-2803). The Division of Animal Welfare of OPRR fulfills responsibilities set forth in the Public Health Service (PHS) Act. These include developing and monitoring, as well as exercising compliance oversight relative to, the PHS Policy on Hu- mane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (Policy), which applies to animals involved in research conducted or supported by any component of PHS; estab- lishing criteria for and negotiation of assurances of compliance with institutions engaged in PHS-conducted or PHS-supported research using animals; directing the development and implementation of educational and instructional programs with respect to the use of animals in research; and evaluating the effectiveness of PHS policies and programs for the humane care and use of laboratory animals. Primate information Center, Regional Primate Research Center SJ-50, Univer- sity of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (phone: 206-543-4376; fax: 206-865- 0305). The Primate Information Center's goal is to provide bibliographic access to all scientific literature on nonhuman primates for the research and educational communities. Coverage spans all publication categories (articles, books, abstracts, technical reports, dissertations, book chapters, etc.) and many subjects (behavior, colony management, ecology, reproduction, field studies, disease models, veteri- nary science, pharmacology, physiology, evolution, taxonomy, genetics, zooge- ography, etc.). A comprehensive computerized database is maintained and used to publish a variety of bibliographic products to fulfill this mission. The collec- tion of materials on primate research is fairly comprehensive. However, the cen- ter is an indexing service and not a library, so materials generally do not circulate. It will make individually negotiated exceptions for items that researchers are not able to acquire otherwise.

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORGANIZATIONS Primate Supply Information Clearinghouse (PSIC), Cathy A. Johnson-Delany, Director, Regional Primate Research Center, SJ-50 University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (phone: 206-543-5178; fax: 206-685-0305; e-mail: cathydj @bart.rprc.washington.edu). The goal of PSIC is to provide communication between research institutions, zoologic parks, and domestic breeding colonies for the efficient sharing of non- human primates and their tissues, equipment, and services. PSIC also publishes New Listings and the Annual Resource Guide. Purina Mills, Inc., 505 North 4th and D Street, Richmond, IN 47374. Purina Mills, Inc. offers a correspondence course, called Laboratory Animal Care Course, for everyone working with small animals. The course includes the following six lessons: introduction to laboratory animals; management of labora- tory animals, housing, equipment, and handling; disease and control; glossary; and housing supplements and miscellaneous. Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW), 7833 Walker Drive, Suite 340, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (phone: 301-345-3500, fax: 301-345-3503). SCAW is an independent organization supported by individuals and institu- tions involved in research with animals and concerned about maintaining the highest standards of humane care. SCAW publishes resource materials, organizes conferences, and supports a wide variety of educational activities. Universities Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW),8 Hamilton Close, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Herts EN6 3QD, United Kingdom (phone: 44-707-58202; fax: 44-707-49279). UFAW was founded in 1926 as the University of London Animal Welfare Society (IULAWS). Its work expanded, and in order to allow a wider member- ship, UFAW was formed in 1938 with ULAWS as its first branch. UFAW pub- lishes the UFAWHandbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory Animals and other publications. United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspec- tion Service, Regulatory Enforcement of Animal Care (REAC), 4700 River Road, Unit 84, Riverdale, MD 20737-1234 (phone: 301-734-4981; fax: 301-734- 4328; e-mail: sstith@aphis.usda.gov). The missions of the Animal Care Program are to provide leadership in estab- lishing acceptable standards of humane animal care and treatment and to monitor

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APPENDIX B: SELECTED ORCANlZ4TlONS and achieve compliance through inspections and educational and cooperative efforts. Copies of the Animal Welfare Regulations and the Animal Welfare Act are available from REAC. Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center (WRPRC) Library, University of Wisconsin, 1220 Capitol Court, Madison, WI 53715-1299 (phone: 608-263- 3512; fax: 608-263-4031; e-mail: library@primate.wisc.edu; URL: http:// www.primate.wisc.edu/WRPRC). The library supports research programs of WRPRC and aids in the dissemi- nation of information about nonhuman primates to the scientific community. Books, penodicals, newsletters, and other documents in all languages related to prirnatology are included. Special collections include rare books and audiovisual materials.

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APPENDIX c Some Federal Laws Relevant to Animal Care and Use ANIMAL WELFARE The Animal Welfare Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-544)as amended by the Animal Welfare Act of 1970 (P.L. 91-579); 1976 Amendments to the Animal Welfare Act (P.L. 94-279); the Food Security Act of 1985 (P.L 99-198), Subtitle F (Ani- mal Welfare File Name: PL99198); and the Food and Agriculture Conservation and Trade Act of 1990 (P.L. 101-624), Section 2503, Protection of Pets (File Name: PL101624)contains provisions to prevent the sale or use of animals that have been stolen, to prohibit animal-fighting ventures, and to ensure that animals used in research, for exhibition, or as pets receive humane care and treatment. The law provides for regulating the transport, purchase, sale, housing, care, han- dling, and treatment of such animals. Regulatory authority under the Animal Welfare Act is vested in the secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and implemented by USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). Rules and regulations pertaining to implementation are published in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 9 (Animals and Animal Products), Chapter 1, Subchapter A (Animal Wel- fare). Available from: Regulatory Enforcement and Animal Care, APHIS, USDA, Unit 85, 4700 River Road, Riverdale, MD 20737-1234. File Name 9CFR93. ENDANGERED SPECIES The Endangered Species Act of 1973 (P.L. 93-205; 87 Statute 884) became effective on December 28, 1973, supplanting the Endangered Species Conserva- 114