Appendix H
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Larry E. Humes, Ph.D. (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. Past roles have included department chair, director of the Center for Hearing Aid Research and Technical Training, and director of audiology. His research is focused on behavioral issues related to auditory perception, hearing loss, and hearing aids, with a particular interest in age-related hearing loss. He is the principal investigator for a study funded by the National Institute on Aging on Speech-Recognition Difficulties of the Hearing Impaired, and co-investigator for a study funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders on the Perception of Speech by Normal and Impaired Listeners. Dr. Humes was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA) (1989–1992) and also served as an advisor to that committee. He is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and has served as an editor or editorial consultant to publications including Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and Ear and Hearing. He holds a Ph.D. in audiology from Northwestern University.


Elliott Berger, M.S., is the senior scientist for auditory research at E•A•R/ Aearo Company, where he conducts hearing protector research and development. He has studied hearing protection, hearing conservation, and related topics for more than 25 years. He has authored 14 textbook chapters, written over 60 articles on hearing protection/conservation, and was the



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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Appendix H Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Larry E. Humes, Ph.D. (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences at Indiana University. Past roles have included department chair, director of the Center for Hearing Aid Research and Technical Training, and director of audiology. His research is focused on behavioral issues related to auditory perception, hearing loss, and hearing aids, with a particular interest in age-related hearing loss. He is the principal investigator for a study funded by the National Institute on Aging on Speech-Recognition Difficulties of the Hearing Impaired, and co-investigator for a study funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders on the Perception of Speech by Normal and Impaired Listeners. Dr. Humes was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA) (1989–1992) and also served as an advisor to that committee. He is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and has served as an editor or editorial consultant to publications including Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, and Ear and Hearing. He holds a Ph.D. in audiology from Northwestern University. Elliott Berger, M.S., is the senior scientist for auditory research at E•A•R/ Aearo Company, where he conducts hearing protector research and development. He has studied hearing protection, hearing conservation, and related topics for more than 25 years. He has authored 14 textbook chapters, written over 60 articles on hearing protection/conservation, and was the

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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus principal editor for the fourth and fifth editions of the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Noise Manual. His principal research has involved evaluation of techniques for measuring and specifying hearing protector attenuation and the limits to their performance caused by the bone-conduction pathways, as well as means for improving the effectiveness of hearing conservation programs. Mr. Berger chairs the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) working group S12/WG11 on hearing protector attenuation and performance, is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, past-president of the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA), fellow of the AIHA and past-chair of its Noise Committee, a board member of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation, and a recipient of the NHCA’s Outstanding Hearing Conservationist Award. Barbara A. Bohne, Ph.D., is professor of otolaryngology (neurobiology) at Washington University School of Medicine. From 1987 though 2003, she was also senior research scientist at the Central Institute for the Deaf in St. Louis. Her research focuses on the anatomy and physiology of the inner ear and the biological mechanisms of noise-related damage to the inner ear. She is the principal investigator for the study Adverse Effects of Noise on Hearing: Basic Mechanisms, which is supported by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Dr. Bohne is a member of the editorial board for the journal Hearing Research. She previously served 8 years on study sections for the National Institutes of Health. She has also served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA). Dr. Bohne holds a Ph.D. in neurobiology from Washington University. Anthony Cacace, Ph.D., is associate professor at The Neurosciences Institute of the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College. From 1993 to 2003, he was an associate professor in the Division of Otolaryngology of the Department of Surgery at Albany Medical College. He also served as director of oto-neurological research, Division of Otolaryngology, Albany Medical College, from 1985 to 2003. Dr. Cacace is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee of the American Tinnitus Association. He is also an associate editor of the American Journal of Audiology and assistant editor for hearing science for the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. He is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the American Academy of Audiology. Dr. Cacace has a Ph.D. in communication sciences and disorders/audiology and neuroscience from Syracuse University. His post-doctoral fellowship training in neurophysiology was performed at the Wadsworth Laboratories, New York State Health Department.

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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus Karen J. Cruickshanks, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences as well as in the Department of Population Health Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of age-related sensory disorders, diabetes and its complications, and aging. She has written more than 100 articles on these topics and is the principal investigator for two major studies of the epidemiology of age-related hearing loss. Dr. Cruickshanks serves as frequent advisor or reviewer for the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and as a reviewer for a variety of journals, including the American Journal of Epidemiology, the American Journal of Public Health, Ear and Hearing, and the New England Journal of Medicine. She is a member of the Society for Epidemiological Research and the American Epidemiological Society. Dr. Cruickshanks received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Richard Danielson, Ph.D., is the manager for audiology and hearing conservation at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. Working for the National Space and Biomedical Research Institute and Baylor College of Medicine, he leads a program aimed at preventing noise-induced hearing loss during space and ground-based missions among astronauts, crew, pilots, and other flight-associated personnel. He is the chair of the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation and a faculty member of several university graduate programs. Prior to his work at NASA, Dr. Danielson served for 28 years as an audiology officer in the U.S. Army Medical Department, including roles as the director of the Army Audiology and Speech Center at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, director of audiology at Madigan Army Medical Center, and officer-in-charge of an audiology task force in Saudi Arabia. Dr. Danielson holds a Ph.D. in human development and communication sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas. Judy R. Dubno, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery of the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). She is also a member of the MUSC Center for Advanced Imaging Research. Her research focuses on human auditory system function, with emphasis on the encoding of auditory information in simple sounds and speech and how these abilities change in adverse listening conditions, with age, and with hearing loss. This research is currently funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Dubno’s other activities currently include serving as a member of the Executive Council of the Acoustical Society of America, the Tinnitus Research Consortium, and the Clinical Research Discussion Group of the NIDCD. She previously served

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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus as a member of the National Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council of the NIH and the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA). She was also president of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology. She is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She holds a Ph.D. in speech/hearing science from the City University of New York Graduate School and University Center. George A. Gates, M.D., is the former director of the Virginia Merrill Bloedel Hearing Research Center at the University of Washington, emeritus professor in the Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery in the School of Medicine, and adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health and Community Medicine. His research includes work on the biology of presbycusis and Ménière’s disease, and he has conducted clinical trials in otitis media and Ménière’s disease. He is currently the scientific medical director of the Deafness Research Foundation and previously chaired the Noise Subcommittee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery and the National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference on Cochlear Implants in 1995. He also served on the Working Group on Speech Understanding and Aging of the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA). Donald Henderson, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He also co-founded the Center for Hearing and Deafness of the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1994 and served as its director from 1994 to 2002. He has studied causes of hearing loss over the past 30 years. His current research focus is on the role of free radicals as a factor in hearing loss from noise, drugs, and aging. As a corollary, he is also developing pharmacological techniques for preventing hearing loss by using antioxidants or inhibitors of active hair cell death. He has published more than 150 articles and edited 10 books. Dr. Henderson has a Ph.D. in sensory psychology from the University of Texas. John H. Mills, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Otolarynogology–Head and Neck Surgery at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), where he is also director of the Research Division. His primary interests involve age-related changes in hearing in humans, as indicated by psychophysical and electrophysiological methods, and in noise-induced hearing loss. Dr. Mills is the program director and one of the principal investigators for the program in Experimental and Clinical Studies in Pres-

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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus bycusis at MUSC, which is funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. He is a former chair of the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA) and also served on its Working Group on Hazardous Exposure to Impulse Noise. He is a fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Acoustical Society of America and a scientific fellow of the American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Dr. Mills holds a Ph.D. in audiology from the University of Iowa. Mark R. Stephenson, Ph.D., is a senior research audiologist in the Division of Applied Research and Technology at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Before joining NIOSH, he served 20 years as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force (USAF), most recently as associate chief of the Air Force Biomedical Sciences Corps, with worldwide staff management responsibility for all USAF audiology and speech pathology policies and personnel. Dr. Stephenson is a member of the Acoustical Society of America, a fellow of the American Academy of Audiology, a representative to the Council for Accreditation in Occupational Hearing Conservation, and a member and former vice president of the National Hearing Conservation Association. He is an adjunct faculty member at the Ohio State University and at Miami University (Ohio), and he is the recipient of numerous military and civilian awards for his contributions to the fields of audiology and hearing conservation. Dr. Stephenson holds a Ph.D. in hearing science/ audiology from the Ohio State University. Richard Tyler, Ph.D., is a professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery and Speech Pathology and Audiology at the University of Iowa. His research focuses on the use of cochlear implants in adults and children, the impact and treatment of tinnitus, and treatments for hyperacusis. Dr. Tyler is an author of more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles on these topics. He is currently the principal investigator for a randomized trial of counseling and sound therapy treatments, which is funded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), and is co-director of the Iowa Cochlear Center Project, which is also funded by NIDCD. Dr. Tyler serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee and is on the Board of Directors of the American Tinnitus Association. He jointly holds a patent for a system and method for reducing tinnitus with electricity. Dr. Tyler previously served as a member of the Working Group on Communication Aids for the Hearing Impaired for the National Research Council Committee on Hearing, Bioacoustics, and Biomechanics (CHABA). He has a Ph.D. in psychoacoustics

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Noise and Military Service: Implications for Hearing Loss and Tinnitus from the University of Iowa and a clinical degree in audiology from the University of Western Ontario. Robert B. Wallace, M.D., is professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine. He received the Irene Ensminger Stecher Professorship in April 1999 for cancer-and heart disease-related research. He was formerly head of the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and the director of the University of Iowa Cancer Center. Dr. Wallace’s research interests include cancer epidemiology and prevention; the causes and prevention of chronic, disabling diseases among older persons; women’s health issues; and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. He is a principal investigator of several large clinical trials. He received his medical degree from Northwestern University School of Medicine. He is an Institute of Medicine member and currently serves as chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Board for the Medical Follow-up Agency. He has served on and chaired several other Institute of Medicine studies.