A
SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

Anthony S. Fauci, M.D.


Dr. Fauci received his M.D. degree from Cornell University Medical College in 1966. He then completed an internship and residency at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. In 1968, Dr. Fauci came to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a clinical associate in the Laboratory of Clinical Investigation (LCI) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). In 1974, he became Head of the Clinical Physiology Section, LCI, and in 1980 was appointed Chief of the Laboratory of Immunoregulation, a position he still holds. In 1984, Dr. Fauci became Director of NIAID, where he oversees an extensive research portfolio of basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose, and treat infectious and immune-mediated illnesses, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, illness from potential agents of bioterrorism, tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune disorders, asthma and allergies. In addition, he serves as one of the key advisors to the White House and Department of Health and Human Services on global AIDS issues, and on initiatives to bolster medical and public health preparedness against possible future bioterrorist attacks.


Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D.


Dr. Fineberg is President of the Institute of Medicine. He served as Provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following thirteen years as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as adviser and consultant to the US Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization. At the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to vaccine safety. He is the author, co-author, and co-editor of numerous books and articles on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, tuberculosis control, assessment of new medical technology, clinical and public health decision making, and understanding risk in society.


Neil Ferguson, D. Phil.


Professor Ferguson holds the chair in Mathematical Biology at the Dept. of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College. He uses mathematical and statistical models to investigate the processes shaping infectious disease pathogenesis, evolution and transmission. A key practical focus is advising on disease control policies in public health, clinical and veterinary contexts. As well as basic theoretical work on evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics, Professor Ferguson also applies his work to a range of pathogens, including influenza, SARS, BSE/vCJD, HIV, foot-and-mouth disease and smallpox. He was educated at Oxford University, held a Royal Society University Research Fellowship at Oxford, then a readership at the University of Nottingham before moving to Imperial College. He was awarded an OBE (a UK ‘honour’) by the British government in 2002 for “services to epidemiology and the control of infectious disease”,



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John R. La Montagne Memorial Symposium on Pandemic Influenza Research: Meeting Proceedings A SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES Anthony S. Fauci, M.D. Dr. Fauci received his M.D. degree from Cornell University Medical College in 1966. He then completed an internship and residency at The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. In 1968, Dr. Fauci came to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a clinical associate in the Laboratory of Clinical Investigation (LCI) at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). In 1974, he became Head of the Clinical Physiology Section, LCI, and in 1980 was appointed Chief of the Laboratory of Immunoregulation, a position he still holds. In 1984, Dr. Fauci became Director of NIAID, where he oversees an extensive research portfolio of basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose, and treat infectious and immune-mediated illnesses, including HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, illness from potential agents of bioterrorism, tuberculosis, malaria, autoimmune disorders, asthma and allergies. In addition, he serves as one of the key advisors to the White House and Department of Health and Human Services on global AIDS issues, and on initiatives to bolster medical and public health preparedness against possible future bioterrorist attacks. Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D. Dr. Fineberg is President of the Institute of Medicine. He served as Provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following thirteen years as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as president of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as adviser and consultant to the US Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization. At the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to vaccine safety. He is the author, co-author, and co-editor of numerous books and articles on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, tuberculosis control, assessment of new medical technology, clinical and public health decision making, and understanding risk in society. Neil Ferguson, D. Phil. Professor Ferguson holds the chair in Mathematical Biology at the Dept. of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College. He uses mathematical and statistical models to investigate the processes shaping infectious disease pathogenesis, evolution and transmission. A key practical focus is advising on disease control policies in public health, clinical and veterinary contexts. As well as basic theoretical work on evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics, Professor Ferguson also applies his work to a range of pathogens, including influenza, SARS, BSE/vCJD, HIV, foot-and-mouth disease and smallpox. He was educated at Oxford University, held a Royal Society University Research Fellowship at Oxford, then a readership at the University of Nottingham before moving to Imperial College. He was awarded an OBE (a UK ‘honour’) by the British government in 2002 for “services to epidemiology and the control of infectious disease”,

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John R. La Montagne Memorial Symposium on Pandemic Influenza Research: Meeting Proceedings for his contribution to advising on the control of the foot-and-mouth epidemic in the UK in 2001. His current research focus is on the use of models as contingency planning tools for emerging infections (pandemic influenza in particular) and bioterrorism. Bruce Gellin, MD Dr. Gellin is the Director of the National Vaccine Program Office (NVPO) in the US Department of Health and Human Services. Before joining the NVPO, Dr. Gellin was the director of the National Network for Immunization Information, an organization he founded to be a resource for up-to-date, authoritative information about vaccines and immunizations. Dr. Gellin has had broad experience in public health aspects of infectious diseases and has held positions at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Julie Louise Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H. Dr. Gerberding is the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Before becoming CDC Director and ATSDR Administrator, Dr. Gerberding was Acting Deputy Director of National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID), where she played a major role in leading CDC’s response to the anthrax bioterrorism events of 2001. She joined CDC in 1998 as Director of the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, NCID, where she developed CDC’s patient safety initiatives and other programs to prevent infections, antimicrobial resistance, and medical errors in healthcare settings. Prior to coming to CDC, Dr. Gerberding was a University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) faculty member and directed the Prevention Epicenter, a multidisciplinary research, training, and clinical service program that focused on preventing infections in patients and their healthcare providers. Dr. Gerberding is an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at Emory University and an Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) at UCSF. Jesse Goodman, MD. Dr. Goodman serves as the Director of FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER). Dr. Goodman joined FDA's Office of the Commissioner in 1998, where he directed the U.S. government's Interagency Task Force on Antimicrobial Resistance. He later moved to CBER, where he has been active in a wide variety of clinical and public health issues including bioterrorism preparedness and response, product development, human subject protection, and blood and vaccine safety. He is a virologist who is board certified in internal medicine, oncology, and infectious diseases. Educated at Harvard, he earned an M.D. from Albert Einstein, and did residency and fellowship training at the University of Pennsylvania and UCLA. Honorable Michael O. Leavitt Secretary Leavitt was sworn in as the 20th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on January 26, 2005. As secretary, he leads national efforts to protect the health of all Americans and provide essential human services to those in need. He manages the largest civilian department in the federal government, with more than 66,000 employees and a budget that accounts for almost one out of every four federal dollars. Prior to his current service,

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John R. La Montagne Memorial Symposium on Pandemic Influenza Research: Meeting Proceedings Secretary Leavitt served as Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Governor of Utah. While at EPA, Administrator Leavitt signed the Clean Air Diesel Rule, implemented new, more-protective air quality standards for ozone and fine particle pollution and organized a regional collaboration of national significance to clean and protect the Great Lakes. Sec. Leavitt is widely recognized as a health care innovator and welfare reformer, and his record of achievement in Utah bears this out. He was chosen by the nation's governors to represent the states in Congress on welfare reform, Medicaid and children's health insurance. As Secretary of Health and Human Services he is committed to unleashing the power of technology to improve the quality of care, reduce mistakes and manage costs. Klaus Stöhr, D.V.M. Dr. Klaus Stöhr is the Project Leader for World Health Organization Global Influenza Programme. Dr. Stohr trained as a veterinarian in East Germany and later became an expert in diseases that are transmitted from animals to people. He joined the WHO in 1992. More recently he played a crucial role in the WHO investigation of SARS and now is leading the WHO’s efforts to prepare for an influenza pandemic. John Treanor, M.D. Dr. Treanor received his MD degree from the University of Rochester in Rochester NY and Internal Medicine internship and residency training at the University of Vermont, in Burlington, Vermont. He then did clinical and research training in Infectious Diseases at the University of Rochester and in the Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, NIH, Bethesda MD. Since 1988 Dr. Treanor has been a member of the Infectious Diseases Unit at the University of Rochester, where he directs the Vaccines and Treatments Evaluation Unit (VTEU). Dr. Treanor’s primary research interests include clinical virology and clinical trials, especially related to clinical evaluation of novel vaccines for influenza. Current projects are related to candidate pandemic vaccines, approaches to intranasal vaccination using live or inactivated vaccines, and use of expressed recombinant proteins as vaccines. Robert Webster, Ph.D., F.R.S. Dr. Webster is the Rose Marie Thomas Chair of the Virology Division of the Department of Infectious Diseases at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. In addition to his position at St. Jude, he is Director of the U.S. Collaborating Center of the World Health Organization (WHO), dealing with the ecology of animal influenza viruses. The center is the world’s only laboratory designed to study influenza at the animal-human interface. Dr. Webster’s interests include the structure and function of influenza virus proteins and the development of new vaccines and antivirals; the importance of influenza viruses in wild birds as a major reservoir of influenza viruses and their role in the evolution of new pandemic strains for humans and lower animals.

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