Appendixes



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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning Appendixes

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning A Committee and Staff Biographies John D. Christie (Chair) is a senior fellow at LMI. He has an extensive background in Department of Defense (DOD) resource allocation, acquisition policy, and program analysis. From 1989 to 1993, Dr. Christie was the Director of Acquisition Policy and Program Integration for the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition). In this role, he directed the preparation of a comprehensive revision of all defense acquisition policies and procedures and prepared comprehensive acquisition program alternatives for the Secretary of Defense that resulted in multibillion-dollar budget reductions. From 1972 to 1976, Dr. Christie served as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Program Analysis and Evaluation. As a member of Army Science Board in the 1980s, he was called upon to direct reviews of the Army analytical community and operations research activities for the Vice Chief of Staff, including the support of the overall Army acquisition process and its integration with the programming and budgeting process. From 1994 to 1995, Dr. Christie coordinated a process team effort for the Commission on Roles and Missions of the Armed Forces; this team provided the commission with recommendations for improving defense management of the DOD planning processes with respect to requirements generation and resource allocation. Dr. Christie has also been an active participant in studies of the National Research Council (NRC), having served as chair of the committee that produced Recapitalizing the Navy: A Strategy for Managing the Infrastructure (1998), and as a member of several other NRC study committees, most recently the Panel on Survivability and Lethality Analysis and the Committee for the Role of Experimentation in Building Future Naval Forces. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning Paul K. Davis is senior scientist and research leader at RAND, where he works primarily on defense planning. He is also a professor on the faculty of the Pardee RAND Graduate School. He served a 5-year tour at RAND as corporate research manager for defense and technology planning and was program manager for strategy planning and assessment. Prior to joining RAND, Dr. Davis was a senior executive in the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Program Analysis and Evaluation (OSD/PA&E). He holds a B.S. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in chemical physics. His most recent monographs involve capabilities-based planning, effects-based operations, and strategy for the deterrence and influence component of counterterrorism. John F. Egan is an independent consultant, having retired in 1998 as a senior corporate officer and vice president for corporate development at Lockheed Martin Corporation. He has an extensive background in the management of high-technology enterprises involving both the public and private sectors in defense, aerospace, electronics, and information systems. During his 25-year career with Lockheed Martin (including Sanders and Lockheed), Dr. Egan held diverse executive positions responsible for acquisitions, mergers, joint ventures, strategic planning, business development, and research and development. He also was general manager of two separate profit/loss divisions, respectively engaged in design, engineering, manufacture, sales, and support of (1) defense electronics and (2) commercial computer equipment. Dr. Egan also has a broad understanding of defense programs, business and strategic planning, and acquisition and policy. An electrical engineer by training, he is a former chief scientist for the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), has held senior technical positions in the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering and the Air Force, and has extensive experience with systems for command and control, intelligence, and electronic and information warfare. He is a current member of the CNO’s Executive Panel and Chair of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Kerrie L. Holley is chief technology officer for IBM’s Web services and Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) Center of Excellence. He is chief architect for the Application Innovation Services unit. His expertise includes translating business requirements into process designs for cutting-edge, network-centric distributed solutions. An IBM Distinguished Engineer and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, Mr. Holley has focused on issues related to the modernization of legacy networks and databases to take advantage of Web-services-based computing technologies. Currently, his interests include Web services and e-business solutions, including technical oversight, information technology consulting, adaptive enterprise architecture design, information technology strategy, formation of partnerships among clients and vendors, and managment of technical risks. Mr. Holley holds a B.A. degree in mathematics from DePaul University and a J.D. from the DePaul School of Law. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning Samuel D. Kleinman is director of the Infrastructure and Readiness Team at the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA). Dr. Kleinman has an extensive background in the evaluation of business practices, and at CNA he is responsible for infrastructure and financial issues central to the Department of the Navy. His research interests include reducing the infrastructure, base consolidation, outsourcing, housing, management efficiency, industrial base, acquisition reform, material support, and transportation. Dr. Kleinman has been a participant on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Defense Science Board’s 1996 study of operating and support costs. R. Bowen Loftin is currently at Texas A&M University at Galveston. He was formerly executive director of the Virginia Modeling, Analysis and Simulation Center and director of simulation programs at Old Dominion University (ODU), with responsibility for the university’s graduate programs in modeling and simulation. Dr. Loftin joined ODU in Norfolk, Virginia, in 2000, as professor of electrical and computer engineering and professor of computer science. Previously he had been professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science and director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Virtual Environments Research Institute at the University of Houston. Since 1983 Dr. Loftin, his students, and coworkers have been exploring the application of advanced software technologies, such as artificial intelligence and interactive, three-dimensional computer graphics, to the development of training and visualization systems. He is a frequent consultant to both industry and government in the area of advanced training technologies and scientific and engineering data visualization. Dr. Loftin has served on numerous advisory committees. Awards that he has received include the University of Houston-Downtown Award for Excellence in Teaching and Service, the American Association of Artificial Intelligence Award for an innovative application of artificial intelligence, NASA’s Space Act Award, the NASA Public Service Medal, and the 1995 NASA Invention of the Year Award. He is the author or coauthor of more than a hundred technical publications. L. David Montague (NAE), an independent consultant, is retired president of the Missile Systems Division at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and a former officer of Lockheed Corporation. A member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), he has more than 40 years of experience in the design, development, and program management of military weapons and their related systems. His expertise includes complex systems engineering and systems integration of ballistic missiles, cruise missiles, and unmanned aerial vehicles. Mr. Montague is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and a previous recipient of the AIAA’s Missile Systems Award. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the Navy Strategic Systems Steering Task Group and task forces for both the U.S. Army and the Defense Science Board. Mr. Montague is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board.

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning Gene H. Porter is an independent consultant in matters relating to national security planning and weapons system development. His current clients include the Institute of Defense Analyses. Most recently, Mr. Porter has been supporting the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) in defining the detailed Defense Planning Scenarios that are intended to guide the development of U.S. military force posture and modernization programs through the end of the decade. This analytic work has involved an all-source examination of potential threats, including space-based threats, and potential U.S. responses. Previously, Mr. Porter had served as director of Acquisition Policy and Program Integration for the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, where he was responsible for long-range planning, programming, and budgeting matters related to new military warfare systems. His earlier career included various staff and line management positions at Lockheed-Sanders Corporation in the development and manufacture of military and commercial electronic systems, including mine and undersea warfare systems. Mr. Porter has served on numerous scientific and advisory committees, including as chair of the NRC Committee for Mine Warfare Assessment. Andrew P. Sage (NAE) is founding dean emeritus of the School of Information Technology and Engineering at George Mason University (GMU) and First American Bank Professor of the GMU Department of Systems Engineering and Operations Research. His research interests include systems engineering and management efforts in a variety of application areas, such as systems integration and architecting, reengineering, software systems engineering, total quality management, cost and effectiveness assessment, and industrial ecology and sustainable development. Prior to joining the faculty at GMU he served on the faculty at the University of Arizona, the University of Florida, Southern Methodist University, and the University of Virginia. Dr. Sage has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Council on Systems Engineering, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Sage received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the Citadel, an S.M. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. from Purdue University. Elaine Simmons, currently in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and formerly a research fellow at LMI, is experienced in DOD strategic planning, needs assessment, and joint, collaborative analytic studies. She was the LMI lead on the Joint Defense Capabilities Study (known as the Aldridge Study), which developed a new process and organizational alternatives for making joint needs the foundation for the defense program. She also led a study for the Office of Force Transformation that developed Active/Reserve Component options using a capabilities-based approach. Ms. Simmons came to LMI from the Navy, where, as a member of the Senior Executive Service (SES), she was head of the Campaign Analysis and Modeling Branch in the Assessment Division/N81 in the

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV). Prior to working at OPNAV, she was a staff member in OSD/PA&E, serving as the director of the Joint Data Support organization, which provided data and analytic products to large joint studies such as the Mobility Requirements Study 2005. Before joining the government, Ms. Simmons was an operations director for GRC International. She earned a master’s degree in defense policy analysis from the George Washington University and a bachelor’s degree in international studies from George Mason University. William D. Smith retired as an admiral in the U.S. Navy after 38 years of active-duty service. Admiral Smith’s background is in Navy planning, programming, budgeting, and operational issues. His last assignment was as U.S. Military Representative to the NATO Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium. Admiral Smith has served in a number of high-ranking capacities for the Chief of Naval Operations. From 1987 to 1991, he served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Logistics and Navy Program Planning. From 1985 to 1987, he was director of the Fiscal Management Division/Comptroller of the Navy. Admiral Smith is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Staff Charles F. Draper is director of the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board. He joined the NRC in 1997 as a program officer of the Naval Studies Board, later was promoted to senior program officer, and in 2003 became associate director of the board. During his tenure with the board, Dr. Draper has served as the responsible staff officer on a wide range of studies aimed at helping the Department of the Navy with its scientific, technical, and strategic planning. His recent efforts include studies in the areas of network-centric operations, theater missile defense, mine warfare, and nonlethal weapons. Prior to joining the Naval Studies Board, he was the lead mechanical engineer at Sensytech, Inc. (formerly S.T. Research Corporation), where he provided technical and program management support for satellite Earth station and small-satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic force microscope to measure the nanomechanical properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Inc., working on-site at NRL on the development of an underwater X-ray backscattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Arul Mozhi is senior program officer at the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board and served as senior program officer at the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design and National Materials Advisory Board. Prior to joining the NRC in 1999, Dr. Mozhi was senior scientist and program

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Naval Analytical Capabilities: Improving Capabilities-Based Planning manager at UTRON, Inc., a high-tech company in the Washington, D.C., area, working on pulsed electrical and chemical energy technologies applied to materials processing. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Mozhi was a senior engineer and task leader at Roy F. Weston, Inc., a leading environmental consulting company working on long-term nuclear materials behavior and systems engineering related to nuclear waste transport, storage, and disposal in support of the U.S. Department of Energy. Before 1989 he was a materials scientist at Marko Materials, Inc., a high-tech firm in the Boston area, working on rapidly solidified materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in 1986) in materials engineering from the Ohio State University and then served as a postdoctoral research associate there. He received his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1982.