Appendixes



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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy Appendixes

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy A Biographies of Committee Members and Staff Richard J. Ivanetich (Co-Chair) is an institute fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). His experience spans a number of areas involving defense systems, technology, and operations analyses, having been primarily concerned with computer and information systems, command-and-control systems and procedures, modeling and simulation of systems and forces, crisis management, and strategic and theater nuclear forces. His previous positions at IDA include serving as director of the Computer and Software Engineering Division and assistant director of the System Evaluation Division. Prior to joining IDA in 1975, Dr. Ivanetich was assistant professor of physics at Harvard University. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA’s) Information Science and Technology Study Group, serving from 1990 to 2004. Dr. Ivanetich was a member of the Naval Studies Board of the National Research Council (NRC) from 1998 to 2004. In 2003 he was elected a National Associate of the National Academies. Bruce Wald (Co-Chair) is founder of Arlington Education Consultants, which advises organizations in both the private and public sectors. Dr. Wald’s expertise includes electronic warfare, communications, space surveillance, and computer architectures, with particular emphasis on their implications for naval and national security issues. Dr. Wald served at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for 33 years, in positions of progressively increasing line responsibility in system and technology development, in project and group leadership, and in senior management. In his last position at NRL, Dr. Wald served as associate director of research and director of space and communications technology. Previously, he

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy had been superintendent of NRL’s Communications Sciences Division, and before that the founding head of its Computer Science Branch. Dr. Wald has served on panels of numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Army Science Board, the Defense Science Board, and the Naval Research Advisory Committee. In 2000 he served as chair of the NRC Committee for the Review of the Office of Naval Research’s Marine Corps Science and Technology Program. He was a member of the Naval Studies Board from 1994 to 2000, and in 2002 was elected a National Associate of the National Academies. Robert F. Brammer is chief technology officer at TASC, Inc., Northrop Grumman Information Technology, where his responsibilities include leadership and oversight of TASC’s technology base and management of the TASC internal research and development program. Dr. Brammer’s expertise includes analysis and visualization of very large information security databases and risk-management techniques for distributed critical infrastructure. In addition, he worked on the Apollo program and as a principal investigator on several National Aeronautics and Space Administration satellite remote-sensing programs. Dr. Brammer is a fellow of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers and of the American Meteorological Society. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Panel on Systems Analysis and Systems Engineering for the National Research Council report Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism (2002). Dr. Brammer received a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Maryland. Joseph R. Cipriano is vice president for advanced solutions at Lockheed Martin Information Technology, where his expertise includes the design, development, and management of large-scale systems and programs. From 1999 until October 2002, Mr. Cipriano served as the Department of the Navy’s Program Executive Officer for Information Technology (PEO IT). His efforts in that role led to establishment of the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) Program, the Defense Integrated Military Human Resource System, and the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System. Prior to serving as PEO IT, Mr. Cipriano served at the Naval Sea Systems Command as the Navy’s first Battle Force System Engineer and Deputy Commander for Warfare Systems. In the early 1990s, he was director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Superconducting Super Collider program. Among his many professional awards is the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the rank of Distinguished Executive in the Senior Executive Service. Archie R. Clemins, ADM, USN (Ret.), is president of Caribou Technologies, Inc., and co-owner of TableRock International, LLC, both international consulting firms concentrating on the transitioning of commercial technology to government. He retired from the U.S. Navy after more than 30 years of service, concluding that time as commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, the world’s largest

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy combined fleet command. During his Navy service, he strongly supported the establishment of the Navy’s Information Technology for the 21st Century (IT-21) and NMCI initiatives. Building on this experience, Admiral Clemins has remained a strong advocate for the accelerated use of information technology and the adaptation of the best commercial practices in the military and the government. Currently, he is vice chair of two start-up firms developing advanced electron beam systems. Admiral Clemins received an M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Brig “Chip” Elliott is principal engineer at BBN Technologies, where he has led the design and successful implementation of a number of secure, mission-critical networks based on novel Internet technology for the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom. Mr. Elliott’s expertise is in the areas of wireless Internet technology, mobile ad hoc networks, quality-of-service issues, and novel routing techniques. He has also acted as a senior adviser on a number of national and commercial networks, including the Discoverer II, Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS)-Low, and on Celestri/Teledesic satellite constellations and Boeing’s Connexion system. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Army Science Board’s Advanced Research and Development Activity (ARDA) Technical Experts Panel and the Defense Science Board. Mr. Elliott is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Joel S. Engel is president of JSE Consulting, where he provides guidance to telecommunications equipment companies on next-generation product development and presents expert testimony in legal cases. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Engel has expertise in areas including the management of technology strategies, communications system interoperability, network infrastructure development, and cellular phone systems. Dr. Engel’s prior positions include those of vice president for technology at Ameritech and vice president for research and development at MCI. A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Dr. Engel was awarded the Alexander Graham Bell Medal and the National Medal of Technology for his contributions to telecommunications. Jude E. Franklin is technical director for command-and-control systems at Raytheon Network-Centric Systems. His expertise includes strategic technology planning; management of research and development programs; command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) systems integration; battle management systems; and information technology systems development. Currently, he is responsible for developing strategic technology plans and roadmaps for command-and-control systems. Prior to joining Raytheon, Dr. Franklin spent more than 17 years at Litton PRC, becoming vice president for Litton PRC and chief technology officer and general man-

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy ager of the PRC Center for Applied Technology. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Catholic University of America. John T. Hanley, Jr., is deputy director of the Joint Advanced Warfighting Program at the Institute for Defense Analyses. His expertise includes strategy and concept development, command and control, joint experimentation, military operations analysis, and war gaming. Dr. Hanley formerly served as assistant director for risk management at the Office of Force Transformation of the Secretary of Defense; special assistant to the commander-in-chief, U.S. Forces Pacific; and deputy director of the Chief of Naval Operations Strategic Studies Group. Dr. Hanley holds a Ph.D. in operations research and management science from Yale University. Kerrie L. Holley is chief architect for IBM Global Services e-Business Integration unit, where his expertise includes translating business requirements into process designs for cutting-edge network-centric distributed solutions. An IBM Distinguished Engineer and a member of the IBM Academy of Technology, Mr. Holley has focused on issues related to the modernization of legacy networks and databases to take advantage of Web-services-based computing technologies. Currently, his interests include Web services and e-business solutions, including technical oversight, information technology (IT) consulting, adaptive enterprise architecture design, IT strategy, formation of partnerships among clients and vendors, and management of technical risks. Mr. Holley holds a B.A. degree in mathematics from De Paul University and a J.D. from the De Paul School of Law. Kenneth L. Jordan, Jr., is an independent consultant. His recent clients include Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), with which he worked on the assessment of systems engineering and network-centric programs, such as the Wideband Gapfiller Satellite program as well as the Department of Defense Transformational Communications Architecture effort. Previously, Dr. Jordan had spent more than 20 years with SAIC in positions of increasing seniority and oversight, including as corporate vice president and chief scientist of the Information Technology Solutions Group and vice president and division manager of the Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence Systems Analysis Division. In addition, Dr. Jordan served as the principal deputy assistant secretary for research and development, U.S. Air Force, and as director of strategic and space systems in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Jordan received an Sc.D. in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Otto Kessler is principal staff engineer at the MITRE Corporation, where his responsibilities include the development of information management systems and technologies focused on the data-gathering and -exploitation needs of the military. Mr. Kessler’s expertise includes data fusion, resource and collection

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy management, automated situation and threat analysis techniques, signal and image processing, and development of surveillance sensors and systems. Previously he served at DARPA, the Office of Naval Research, and the Naval Air Development Center. Mr. Kessler’s awards include the Defense Medal for Exceptional Public Service. Jerry A. Krill is head of the Power Projection Systems Department at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). The department includes two principal areas: strike warfare (including the JHU/APL work on the Tomahawk Cruise Missile program) and information-centric operations (include JHU/APL’s role as trusted agent for systems engineering with the National Security Agency). Dr. Krill’s expertise includes weapons systems engineering, sensor-to-weapons networks, missile defense, over-the-horizon missile command-and-control systems, and microwave technology. His prior positions at JHU/APL include programs manager for the Air and Missile Defense Area and supervisor of the Weapon Systems Engineering Branch. Dr. Krill received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland. Ann K. Miller is the Cynthia Tang Missouri Distinguished Professor of Computer Engineering at the University of Missouri-Rolla. Her expertise includes information assurance, with an emphasis on computer and network security; and computer engineering, with an emphasis on large-scale systems engineering, satellite communications, and real-time software. Prior to taking up her current position, Dr. Miller had served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition (Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence, Electronic Warfare, and Space); Department of the Navy Chief Information Officer; and Director for Information Technologies for Department of Defense Research and Engineering. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from Saint Louis University. William R. Morris, RDML, USN (Ret.), retired recently from Pricewaterhouse-Coopers Consulting (PwCC), where he developed and managed business engagements with public- and private-sector clients, including the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Logistics). His expertise includes supply-chain process improvement and planning for both major government organizations and commercial firms. Admiral Morris joined PwCC in 1993 after a distinguished career in the U.S. Navy, during which he held several of the Service’s most senior positions in acquisition and logistics, including Competition Advocate General of the Navy and Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development, and Acquisition) for business. Admiral Morris is a member of the U.S. Naval Institute. Richard J. Nibe, RADM, USN (Ret.), retired in May 1999 after 31 years of active duty service in command positions and as a naval aviator. His expertise includes

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy strategic planning and the establishment of policies and priorities for the preparation, execution, and budgeting of large-scale research, development, acquisition, and operation of space-based reconnaissance systems. Admiral Nibe’s last assignment involved concurrent appointments as deputy director for military support, National Reconnaissance Office; deputy director for operations (National Systems), J-35, Joint Staff; and deputy director, Defense Support Program Office. Since his retirement, Admiral Nibe has served as an independent consultant on intelligence and defense-related matters. He received a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy. John E. Rhodes, LtGen, USMC (Ret.), retired in August 2000, having served as commanding general of the U.S. Marine Corps Combat Development Command (MCCDC). While at MCCDC, General Rhodes led the Marine Corps in its development of warfighting concepts and in the integration of all aspects of doctrine, organization, training and education, equipment, and support and facilities enabling the Marine Corps to field combat-ready forces. This responsibility entailed, among other things, careful assessments of current and future operating environments and continuous adaptation of the training infrastructure and resources of the Marine Corps in order to ensure that the integrated capabilities were continuously developed for the unified combatant commander. Daniel P. Siewiorek is Buhl University Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Siewiorek is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. His expertise includes computer system design automation, methodologies to improve the reliability of computing systems, and wearable, mobile computing systems. At Carnegie Mellon, he leads an interdisciplinary team that has designed and constructed 20 generations of reliable mobile/wearable computing systems. Dr. Siewiorek is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees such as the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Edward A. Smith, Jr., is senior analyst for effects-based operations and network-centric warfare at the Boeing Company. His expertise includes concept development, naval and defense policy, information warfare, and military intelligence. The career of Dr. Smith, a retired Navy captain with more than 30 years of service, included combat operations in Vietnam and duties as assistant chief of staff for intelligence, Battle Force Sixth Fleet Staff; as deputy director of the Intelligence Directorate, Office of Naval Intelligence; and as intelligence assistant on the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel. In addition, Dr. Smith has held positions in the Navy Field Operational Intelligence Office, the Defense Intelligence Agency, and as assistant naval attaché in Paris. He has written broadly

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FORCEnet: Implementation Strategy on naval operations, and authored a recent book on applying network-centric operations in peace, crisis, and war. Dr. Smith received a Ph.D. in international relations from the American University. Michael J. Zyda is the director of the University of Southern California’s (USC’s) Viterbi School of Engineering’s GamePipe Laboratory, located at the Information Sciences Institute, Marina del Rey, California, and the associate director for games of the USC Integrated Media Systems Center. From fall 2000 to fall 2004, he was the founding director of the MOVES Institute, located at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS), Monterey, California, and a professor in the Department of Computer Science at NPS as well. From 1986 until the founding of the MOVES Institute, he was the director of the NPSNET Research Group. Professor Zyda’s research interests include computer graphics, large-scale, networked 3D virtual environments, agent-based simulation, modeling human and organizational behavior, interactive computer-generated story, modeling and simulation, and interactive games. He is a pioneer in the fields of computer graphics, networked virtual environments, modeling and simulation, and defense/entertainment collaboration. He holds a lifetime appointment as a National Associate of the National Academies, an appointment made by the Council of the National Academy of Sciences in November 2003, awarded in recognition of “extraordinary service” to the National Academies. He served as the principal investigator and development director of the America’s Army PC game funded by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs. He took America’s Army from conception to three million plus registered players and hence, transformed Army recruiting. Staff Charles F. Draper is director of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Before joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Draper was the lead mechanical engineer at S.T. Research Corporation, where he provided technical and program management support for satellite Earth station and small satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic force microscope to measure the nanomechanical properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Incorporated, working on-site at NRL on the development of an underwater X-ray backscattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships.