III
APPENDIXES



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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium III APPENDIXES

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium Appendix A Biographies of Speakers* MICHAEL BORRUS Michael Borrus is a Managing Director of the Petkevich Group, an investment bank focused on the health-care and information technology industries. Before joining the Petkevich Group, Mr. Borrus was a Co-Director of the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy (BRIE) at the University of California at Berkeley and Adjunct Professor in the College of Engineering, where he taught management and technology. He is the author of two books and over 60 chapters, articles, and monographs on a variety of topics including high-technology competition, international trade and investment, and the impact of new technologies on industry and society. For the last decade, he has served as consultant to a variety of governments and firms in the United States, Asia, and Europe on policy and business strategy for international competition in high-technology industries. Mr. Borrus is a graduate of Harvard Law School and a member of the California State Bar. MARK BREGMAN As executive vice president of product operations at VERITAS Software Corporation, Mark Bregman oversees VERITAS Software’s engineering and *   As of February 2003.

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium product management departments to ensure integrated product delivery. Dr. Bregman is responsible for serving VERITAS Software’s existing markets as well as for expanding the company’s portfolio of storage software solutions. Dr. Bregman spent 16 years at IBM where he managed the RS/6000 and Pervasive Computing divisions, IBM Research, and IBM Japan. He was also technical assistant to IBM CEO Lou Gerstner. Most recently, Dr. Bregman was CEO of Airmedia, a wireless Internet firm. Dr. Bregman holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Harvard College and a master’s degree and doctorate in physics from Columbia University. He also serves on the Advisory Board of OptronX, Inc., and on the Board of Overseers of Fermi National Accelerator Lab. He is a member of the Visiting Committee to the Harvard University Libraries, a member of the American Physical Society, and a senior member of IEEE. CAROL A. CORRADO Carol Corrado is Chief of the Industrial Output Section of the Division of Research and Statistics at the Federal Reserve’s Board of Governors. She currently serves as a member of the Executive Committee of the NBER Conference for Research on Income and Wealth and as a member of the Statistics Committee of the National Association of Business Economists. Prior to joining the Governors Board in 1977, Dr. Corrado was a Research Associate at the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachussetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University and worked as an Instructor at Tufts University. In the spring of 2000, she extended her field research as a Visiting Research Faculty Member in the Department of Economics at the University of Maryland. Dr. Corrado’s areas of interest include macroeconomics, technology change and growth, and data collection and estimation methodology. She received a B.S. in administration management science from Carnegie-Mellon University and her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania in 1976. Dr. Corrado has published several books and articles including: “Industrial Production and Capacity Utilization: The 1997 Revision,’’ Business Economics (July 1997); ‘’Decomposition of Productivity and Costs’’ (with Laurence Slifman), American Economic Review (May 1999); and Measuring Capital in a New Economy (ed. with John Haltiwanger and Dan Sichel), which is forthcoming. KENNETH FLAMM Kenneth Flamm is the Dean Rusk Professor of International Affairs at the LBJ School at the University of Texas at Austin. Before this, he worked at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C, where he served 11 years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program. He is a 1973 honors graduate of

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from MIT in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. Defense Secretary William J. Perry awarded him the Department’s Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1995. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of economics at the Instituto Tecnológico de México in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. He has also been an adviser to the Director General of Income Policy in the Mexican Ministry of Finance and a consultant to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the Latin American Economic System, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. Dr. Flamm has made major contributions to our understanding of the growth of the electronics industry, with a particular focus on the development of the computer and the U.S. semiconductor industry. He is currently working on an analytical study of the post-Cold War defense industrial base and has expert knowledge of international trade and high technology industry issues. DALE W. JORGENSON Dale Jorgenson is the Frederic Eaton Abbe Professor of Economics at Harvard University. He has been a Professor in the Department of Economics at Harvard since 1969 and Director of the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at the Kennedy School of Government since 1984. He served as Chairman of the Department of Economics from 1994 to 1997. Dr. Jorgenson received his Ph.D. degree in economics from Harvard in 1959 and his B.A. in economics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, in 1955. Dr. Jorgenson was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1998, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1989, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 1978, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1969. He was elected to Fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1982, the American Statistical Association in 1965, and the Econometric Society in 1964. He was awarded honorary doctorates by Uppsala University and the University of Oslo in 1991. Dr. Jorgenson is President of the American Economic Association. He has been a member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council since 1991 and was appointed to be Chairman of the Board in 1998. He is also Chairman of Section 54, Economic Sciences, of the National Academy of Sciences. He served as President of the Econometric Society in 1987. Dr. Jorgenson is the author of more than 200 articles and the author and

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium editor of 20 books in economics. His collected papers have been published in nine volumes by The MIT Press, beginning in 1995. The most recent volume, Economics and Producer Behavior, was published in 2000. Prior to Dr. Jorgenson’s appointment at Harvard, he was Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he taught from 1959 to 1969. He has been Visiting Professor of Economics at Stanford University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Visiting Professor of Statistics at Oxford University. He has also served as Ford Foundation Research Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago. Forty-two economists have collaborated with Dr. Jorgenson on published research. An important feature of his research program has been collaboration with students in economics at Berkeley and Harvard, mainly through the supervision of doctoral research. This collaboration has often been the outgrowth of a student’s dissertation research and has led to subsequent joint publications. Many of his former students are professors at leading academic institutions in the United States and abroad and several occupy endowed chairs. DALEN E. KEYS Dalen Keys joined DuPont in 1984 in Wilmington, Delaware, at the Experimental Station as a Research Chemist working on high speed photopolymer imaging systems. While at the Experimental Station from 1984 to 1988, he supported projects on microencapsulation, novel materials for the protection of photomasks (pellicles) and holographics. In 1988, he became a Research Supervisor in Towanda, Pennsylvania responsible for the product development efforts supporting the North American Proofing business. In 1991, he became Lab Head for the DuPont Graphic Arts business in Rochester, New York, and then moved into manufacturing as the Technical Superintendent in Parlin, New Jersey, in 1993. In 1994, Dr. Keys relocated to the Frankfurt, Germany area for the DuPont Graphic Arts business. While in Germany from 1994 until 1998, he was Worldwide Technology Director, European Business Manager, and finally Neu Isenburg Plant Manager and Technology Director. He was responsible for global development and manufacture of Graphic Arts products and managed about 650 people. He joined DuPont iTechnologies (then known as P&EM) in August 1998 and participated in the initial “founding” of the DuPont Displays business. In December 1998 he became Global Technology Director for iTechnologies, reporting to the Group Vice President and General Manager. Since January 2001, Dr. Keys has focused his full attentions on Displays and is the Chief Technology Officer. Dr. Keys obtained a B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Alabama in 1980 and a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from Rice University in 1984. He holds six patents and numerous publications. He was a member of the

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium Houghton College President’s Advisory Counsel on Excellence. He is currently Chairman of the United States Displays Consortium. STEVEN LANDEFELD Steven Landefeld has been Director of the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) since 1995. BEA is the statistical agency within the Department of Commerce responsible for the national, international, regional, and industry accounts—including such estimates as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), personal income, corporate profits, the U.S. balance of payments, State and local area personal income, U.S. capital stocks, input-output estimates, foreign direct investment estimates, and GDP-by-industry. Prior to becoming Director of BEA, Dr. Landefeld served in a number of other capacities at the Bureau, including Acting Director, Deputy Director, and Associate Director for International Economics. While at BEA, he has led a number of pioneering efforts in statistics, including the introduction of unbiased estimates of real GDP and prices, the development of monthly estimates of trade in goods and services, alternative balance of payments accounts, integrated economic and environmental accounts, and the use of data exchanges with foreign banks to improve international capital estimates. Dr. Landefeld also has led a number of managerial improvements at the Bureau including the introduction of a performance-based personnel system, the development of “private-sector” financial accounts (BEA was one of the first Bureaus in the Department to receive an unqualified opinion from an outside auditor on its financial statement), and the move from an antiquated mainframe to an integrated micro-computer network (BEA was the first major statistical agency to successfully make such a move). Before coming to BEA, Dr. Landefeld held a number of positions, including Chief of Staff for Presidents Reagan and Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers, Director of the Business Issues Analysis Division at the Department of Commerce, and Research Assistant Professor at Georgetown University. He has authored numerous professional articles and has received numerous awards for his work including the Henri Willem Methorst Medal from the International Statistical Institute; two Abramson Scroll Awards from the National Association of Business Economists; Gold, Silver, and Bronze Awards from the Department of Commerce; and most recently, a Distinguished Executive Award from President Bush. Dr. Landefeld has served on numerous professional committees and working groups including those of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations, and the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth.

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium CHRIS A. MALACHOWSKY Chris Malachowsky co-founded NVIDIA in April 1993 and has been Vice President of Hardware Engineering for the Company since that time. From 1987 until April 1993, Mr. Malachowsky was a Senior Staff Engineer for Sun Microsystems, Inc., a supplier of enterprise network computing products. From 1980 to 1986, Mr. Malachowsky was a manufacturing design engineer at Hewlett-Packard Company. Mr. Malachowsky was a co-inventor of Sun Microsystems’ GX graphics architecture and has authored 39 patents, most of which relate to graphics. Mr. Malachowsky holds a B.S.E.E. degree from the University of Florida and an M.S.C.S. degree from Santa Clara University. MARILYN E. MANSER Marilyn Manser is Associate Commissioner, Office of Productivity and Technology, at the U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). From 1995 through 1999, she was Assistant Commissioner, Office of Employment Research and Program Development at BLS. She held other positions at BLS from 1984 to 1995. Previously, she was Assistant Director and Senior Economist at Mathematica Policy Research, 1978–1983, and Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1973–1978. Dr. Manser has published a number of research papers, primarily in the areas of price measurement, consumer demand, and labor economics. She has coedited two National Bureau of Economic Research Studies in Income and Wealth conference volumes: Labor Statistics Measurement Issues (1998) and Price Measurements and Their Uses (1993). Dr. Manser holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison (1974), an M.A. in economics from Duke University (1968), and a B.S. in mathematics from the University of Maryland (1967). DAVID F. MCQUEENEY David McQueeney leads the IBM Global Services Intellectual Property and Asset Commercialization team. Dave is responsible for developing and deploying the business and technical strategies that maximize the codification and reuse of a broad range of intellectual capital for IBM’s customers. In his previous role, Dr. McQueeney launched the Emerging Business team at IBM Research. Bringing research innovations more quickly to the marketplace, and bringing marketplace forces closer to our researchers, the Emerging Business team was designed to explore several new approaches to further extend the impact of IBM’s research investment on IBM’s customers and partners. Dr. McQueeney has also held other significant positions in IBM Research, including Director of the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, Vice President of

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium Communication Technology, and Vice President of Technical Strategy and Worldwide Operations. As General Manager of Global Solutions in IBM’s Government Industry team, Dr. McQueeney led a team of technical and subject-matter experts offering a portfolio of integrated solutions to governments around the world and was also responsible for the IBM Global Services system integration team dedicated to the U.S. federal government. David McQueeney joined IBM Research in 1988, after receiving a Ph.D. in low-temperature physics from Cornell University. WILLIAM J. RADUCHEL William Raduchel served as the Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of AOL Time Warner, Inc. He assumed that position in 2001 from a similar role at America Online, Inc. He joined AOL in 1999 from Sun Microsystems, Inc., where he was chief strategy officer and a member of its executive committee. In his 11 years at Sun he was also chief information officer, chief financial officer, acting vice president of human resources and vice president of corporate planning and development. Prior to that he had senior executive roles at Xerox Corporation and McGraw-Hill, Inc. Receiving his undergraduate degree in economics from Michigan State University, he earned A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. He became a member of the National Research Council Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy in 2000. He is also a member of the National Resarch Council Committee on Internet Navigation and Domain Name Services and of the National Advisory Board of the Salvation Army and has served as a director of several public companies. WILLIAM T. SIEGLE William Siegle is Senior Vice President, Technology Operations at Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). He is also AMD’s Chief Scientist. He is directly responsible for overseeing the operations of AMD’s Technology Development Group, and the development of technology strategies that support AMD’s business units. Dr. Siegle joined AMD in 1990. Prior to that he was with IBM, most recently as director of the Advanced Technology Center. He has served as Chairman of the board of the Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) and the SRC Education Alliance. Siegle has also served on the Microelectronics Industrial Advisory Committees at MIT, Stanford CIS and Rensselaer, and on the boards of the ETEC Corporation and the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). He is currently a member of the board of International SEMATECH, and the SIA Technology Strategy Committee. Dr. Siegle has a bachelor’s degree, master’s degree and doctorate in electri-

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium cal engineering, all from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is a member of the IEEE, Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and Sigma Xi. WILLIAM J. SPENCER William Spencer was named Chairman Emeritus of the International SEMATECH Board in November 2000 after serving as Chairman of the SEMATECH and International SEMATECH Boards since July 1996. He came to SEMATECH in October 1990 as President and Chief Executive Officer. He continued to serve as President until January 1997 and as CEO until November 1997. During this time, SEMATECH became totally privately funded and expanded to include non-U.S. members. Many gave SEMATECH part of the credit for the U.S. semiconductor turnaround in the 1990s. Dr. Spencer has held key research positions at Xerox Corporation, Bell Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories. Before joining SEMATECH he was Group Vice President and Senior Technical Officer at Xerox Corporation in Stamford, Connecticut, from 1986 to 1990. He established new research centers in Europe and developed a plan for Xerox retaining ownership in spin-out companies from research. Prior to joining the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) as manager of the Integrated Circuit Laboratory in 1981 and as the Center Manager of PARC in 1982 to 1986, Dr. Spencer served as Director of Systems Development from 1978 to 1981 at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, and as Director of Microelectronics at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque from 1973 to 1978, where he developed a silicon processing facility for Department of Energy needs. He began his career in 1959 at Bell Laboratories. Dr. Spencer received the Regents Meritorious Service Medal from the University of New Mexico in 1981; the C. B. Sawyer Award for contribution to “The Theory and Development of Piezoelectric Devices” in 1972; and a Citation for Achievement from William Jewell College in 1969, where he also received an Doctor of Science degree in 1990. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of IEEE, and serves on numerous advisory groups and boards. He was the Regents Professor at the University of California in the spring of 1998. He has been a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkeley School of Engineering and the Haas School of Business since the fall of 1998. He is a Research Professor of Medicine at the University of New Mexico. William Spencer received an A.B. degree from William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri, and an M.S. degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in physics from Kansas State University. HOWARD TAUB Howard Taub is Vice President and Director of the Printing and Imaging Research Center at HP Labs. He is responsible for research programs in digital

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium imaging, commercial printing and publishing, photo finishing, printer system architecture, color science, network interconnect technologies, displays and breakthrough personal storage devices. The center has had a long history of contribution to HP’s printing and storage businesses. Some recent contributions include playing a central role in driving HP’s move into commercial printing, providing core technology that motivated and enabled HP to enter the digital photography business and inventing the encoding scheme that is used in all DVD+RW optical drives. Dr. Taub has worked at HP Labs for 22 years and, before that, at the IBM Watson Research Center and for Dataproducts Corporation. One of his early HP assignments was to manage the research project that invented and did fundamental research on HP’s thermal ink-jet technology. Dr. Taub earned his Ph.D. in solid state physics from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn in New York City. He is an inventor on more than 20 patents in the printing and imaging area and is a member of the American Physical Society and the Society for Imaging Science and Technology. JACK E. TRIPLETT Jack Triplett is a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, in Washington, D.C. His current research at Brookings concerns productivity in health, finance and other services industries, with a focus on developing improved measures of output for these notably difficult to measure sectors of the economy. He serves as a consultant to international organizations and to the statistical agencies of a number of countries on issues of economic measurement and economic statistics. From 1985 to 1997, he was Chief Economist, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (on leave in 1996–1997 to the National Bureau of Economic Research). From 1971 to 1985, Mr. Triplett held positions at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, including Associate Commissioner for Research and Evaluation, and Chief of the Price Research Division. In 1979, he was Assistant Director for Price Monitoring at the Council on Wage and Price Stability. Before his government positions, he taught economics at Washington University (St. Louis) and the University of Oregon, where he was also Assistant Director of the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations. Dr. Triplett has written extensively on problems of economic measurement, including price indexes, national accounts, capital stock and labor input, and productivity and technical change. He is the editor of Fifty Years of Economic Measurement (with Ernst R. Berndt) and The Measurement of Labor Cost, both for the National Bureau of Economic Research, and of Measuring the Prices of Medical Treatments, published by The Brookings Institution. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association, and is the 1997 winner of the Julius Shiskin Award for Economic Statistics, which is awarded jointly by the National Association of Business Economists and the Washington Statistical Society. He

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Deconstructing the Computer: Report of a Symposium was born in Portland, Oregon, and attended Lewis and Clark College. He holds A.B., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from University of California, Berkeley. KENNETH E. WALKER Kenneth Walker has held titles like Application Hunter, Evangelist and most recently, Vice President of Technology Strategy at Philips Electronics. He works as a bridge between the technology and strategy groups and helps define and promote devices for the digital future. Mr. Walker’s primary focus is on new product and market applications, new business models and assisting with key third-party relationships. He utilizes a rich base of knowledge of the industry to form his technology trend analysis. During the past four years at Philips, Mr. Walker was responsible for the establishment of new product lines and the expansion of Philips’ business through emerging markets and digital product categories. He has held specific responsibility for the development of leading electronics, ASICs and integrated solutions to create intelligent devices involving displays, storage and integrated communications. He led the effort at Philips to create the industry’s first ”smart panel” LCD and was a leader in the development of LCD television. As Philips’ representative to the USDC Technical Council, he advised on the development of U.S. competence in display research and he was a key technology liaison for the LG.Philips LCD joint venture. This effort enabled two highly competitive technology groups to come together for the benefit of all parties and to create the world’s leader in flat panel displays. Mr. Walker joined Philips after more than 10 years in Silicon Valley working for a variety of companies, from the innovative, content management start-up Verano, to industry visionaries such as Apple Computer. Prior to his time in Silicon Valley, Kenn received a B.S. in Information and Computer Science and an M.S. in Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology. ROBERT WHITMORE Robert Whitmore is the Senior Vice President of Product Development Engineering at Seagate, Inc., where he is manages all disk drive product development-engineering organizations from various design centers. His production applications at Seagate range from Consumer Electronics to PC computing to Enterprise Storage. In his tenure with Seagate, Mr. Whitmore has held several positions including Vice President of Enterprise Store Design, Vice President of the Twin Cities Manufacturing Operations, and several first- and second-level management positions within the Design Engineering field. Mr. Whitmore currently lives in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Iowa and an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota.