Reference/Study Question

Methods

Geographic variation in patient surveillance after colon cancer surgery (Johnson et al., 1996a)

Method: These five articles describe variation in patient surveillance after colon cancer surgery as reported in two provider surveys.

How practice patterns in colon cancer patient follow-up affected by surgeon age (Johnson et al., 1996c)

Sample: 1,663 members of the American Society are of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS) were asked in 1992 by mailed questionnaire how often they request these nine follow-up evaluations for their patients treated for cure with TNM Stage I, II, or III colon cancer over the first 5 post-treatment years:

  1. Clinic visits

  2. Complete blood count

  3. Liver function tests

  4. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level

  5. Chest X ray

  6. Bone scan

  7. CT scan

  8. Colonoscopy

  9. Sigmoidoscopy

46% (757/1,663) of ASCRS members completed the survey and 39% (646/1,663) provided evaluable data.

How tumor stage affects surgeons’ surveillance strategies after colon cancer surgery (Johnson et al., 1995)

Surveillance after curative colon cancer resection: Practice patterns of surgical subspecialists (Virgo et al., 1995)

Current follow-up strategies after resection of colon cancer: Results of a survey of members of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (Vernava et al., 1994)

The same questionnaire was administered to 1,070 members of the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) in 1993.

 

33% (349/1,070) of SSO members provided evaluable responses.

 

Statistical methods: Repeat measures of analysis of variance.

 

Explanatory variables: Tumor stage and year post-surgery, MSA/city and MSA size, surgeon age, training period, and country of practice (United States versus foreign).



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