TABLE 7-1 Estimated Number of Clinically Active (CA) or Clinically Trained (CT) Mental Health Personnel and Rate per 100,000 Civilian Population in the United States, by Discipline and Year

Discipline

Number

Rate per 100,000 U.S. Civilian Population

Reporting Year

Counseling

111,931 (CA)

49.4

2002

Psychosocial Rehabilitation

100,000 (CT)

37.7

1996

Social Work

99,341 (CA)

35.3

2002

Psychology

88,491 (CT)

31.1

2002

Marriage and Family Therapy

47,111 (CA)

16.7

2002

Psychiatrya

38,436 (CT)

13.7

2001

School Psychology

31,278 (CT)

11.4

2003

Psychiatric Nursing

18,269 (CT)

6.5

2000

Pastoral Counseling

Data not available

 

 

aBased on clinically active psychiatrists in the private sector; excludes residents and fellows.

SOURCE: Duffy et al., 2004.

2001). Individuals with more severe mental illnesses are more likely to receive care from specialty mental health providers (Wang et al., 2000). Psychiatrists, for example, are likely to treat individuals with illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (West et al., 2001). SAMHSA’s most recent estimates of the numbers of clinically trained and clinically active3 mental health personnel are shown in Table 7-1.

Specialty Substance-Use Treatment Providers

Data on the specialty substance-use treatment workforce overall are sparse; no database systematically collects such data (Kaplan, 2003). SAMHSA’s 1996–1997 Alcohol and Drug Services study (Phase I) published in 2003 (SAMHSA, 2003) collected data on the credentials of staff working in a national inventory of hospital, residential, and outpatient substance-use treatment facilities and programs (Mulvey et al., 2003). However, subsequent national surveys of substance-use treatment services have not collected data on staff licensure and certification (SAMHSA, 2004), and in studies of the health care workforce overall, “the addiction treatment workforce is generally overlooked” (McCarty, 2002:1). Experts also note the paucity of data on the preparation of this workforce (Morris et al., 2004).

3  

“Clinically trained” personnel include those who, because of formal training and experience, could provide direct clinical care for mental health conditions, whether or not they do so. “Clinically active” personnel are those actively providing such care.



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