Appendix
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Contributors

Laura L. Carstensen (Chair) is professor of psychology at Stanford University, where she is also chair of the Psychology Department. She has published extensively about emotional, cognitive, and motivational changes with age, and has formulated socioemotional selectivity theory. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society, the American Psychological Association, and the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Carstensen received the Kalish Award for Innovative Research from the Gerontological Society in 1993 and was selected as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2003.

Fredda Blanchard-Fields is a professor in the School of Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. She was associate chair of the School from 1996-2002 and was chair of the National Institutes of Health study section, Social Psychology, Personality, and Interpersonal Processes. She is currently associate editor for Psychology and Aging. Her research focuses on adult development and aging in the areas of social cognition, cognitive change, attributional processes, and everyday problem solving.

Randy L. Buckner is interested in discovering the brain systems that support human memory and how these systems are disrupted by Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to being an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, he is associate professor of psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Buckner is also professor of psychology at Harvard University, where he is affiliated with the Center for Brain Science and faculty of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Buckner received his B.A.



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When I’m 64 Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Contributors Laura L. Carstensen (Chair) is professor of psychology at Stanford University, where she is also chair of the Psychology Department. She has published extensively about emotional, cognitive, and motivational changes with age, and has formulated socioemotional selectivity theory. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society, the American Psychological Association, and the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Carstensen received the Kalish Award for Innovative Research from the Gerontological Society in 1993 and was selected as a Guggenheim Fellow in 2003. Fredda Blanchard-Fields is a professor in the School of Psychology at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. She was associate chair of the School from 1996-2002 and was chair of the National Institutes of Health study section, Social Psychology, Personality, and Interpersonal Processes. She is currently associate editor for Psychology and Aging. Her research focuses on adult development and aging in the areas of social cognition, cognitive change, attributional processes, and everyday problem solving. Randy L. Buckner is interested in discovering the brain systems that support human memory and how these systems are disrupted by Alzheimer’s disease. In addition to being an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, he is associate professor of psychology at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Buckner is also professor of psychology at Harvard University, where he is affiliated with the Center for Brain Science and faculty of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Dr. Buckner received his B.A.

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When I’m 64 degree in psychology and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology and neuroscience from Washington University. Dr. Buckner has published over 100 articles and book chapters and has received the Young Investigator Awards from the Organization of Human Brain Mapping and the Cognitive Neuroscience Society. Margaret Gatz is professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Southern California. She is also a foreign adjunct professor with the Department of Medical Epidemiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Her research interests encompass age-related change in depressive symptoms, risk and protective factors for Alzheimer’s disease, success-fulness of coping mechanisms of the aged, and evaluation of the effects of interventions. Dr. Gatz is past chair of the behavioral sciences section of the Gerontological Society of America and a former Zenith Fellow of the Alzheimer’s Association. She served on the advisory committee for the Minority Aging Network in Psychology and hosted two of its summer institutes. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Duke University, completed her clinical psychology internship at West Virginia University Medical Center, and was a postdoctoral fellow at Duke University’s Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. Christine R. Hartel is the director of the Center for Studies of Behavior and Development at the National Research Council, where she also directs the Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. She is the study director for the Committee on Aging Frontiers in Social Psychology, Personality, and Adult Developmental Psychology. Previously, she served as associate executive director for science at the American Psychological Association and as deputy director for basic research at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. As a research psychologist at the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, Dr. Hartel earned the Army’s highest civilian award for technical excellence. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. She has a Ph.D. in biopsychology from the University of Chicago. Todd F. Heatherton is the Champion International Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Dartmouth College. After 4 years on the faculty at Harvard University, in 1994 he joined the faculty at Dartmouth College, where he is the Director of the Center for Social Brain Sciences and an affiliate of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. His research examines processes related to self, particular self-regulation, self-esteem, and self-referential processing. He has been on the executive committees of several professional societies. He is associate editor of the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, and on the editorial boards of Psychological Science, Journal

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When I’m 64 of Abnormal Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Personality, and Review of General Psychology. His books include: The Social Psychology of Stigma (2000), Can Personality Change? (1994), and, with Michael Gazzaniga, Psychological Science: The Mind, Brain, and Behavior (2003). He received the Petra Shattuck Award for Teaching Excellence from the Harvard Extension School in 1994, the McLane Fellowship from Dartmouth College in 1997, and the Friedman Family Fellowship from Dartmouth College in 2001. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Toronto. Allyson L. Holbrook is assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago in public administration, the Survey Research Laboratory, and the Psychology Department. Dr. Holbrook teaches courses primarily in methodology and statistics and conducts research on survey methodology, particularly the role that social and psychological processes play in the task of answering survey questions, and on attitudes and persuasion, and the role attitude strength plays in moderating the impact of attitudes on thoughts and behaviors. She received her Ph.D. from Ohio State University. Jon A. Krosnick is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences and professor of communication, political science, and (by courtesy) psychology, at Stanford University. Dr. Krosnick received his B.A. degree in psychology from Harvard University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty in 2004, Dr. Krosnick was professor of psychology and political science at Ohio State University, where he co-directed the Summer Institute in Political Psychology. He has taught courses on survey methodology around the world at universities, for corporations, and for government agencies. He has provided expert testimony in court and has served as an on-air election-night television commentator. Dr. Krosnick has served as a consultant to such organizations as Pfizer Pharmaceuticals, the Office of Social Research at CBS, the News Division of ABC, the National Institutes of Health, Home Box Office, NASA, the U.S. Bureau of the Census, and the Urban Institute. George Loewenstein is professor of Economics and Psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1985 and since then has held academic positions at the University of Chicago and Carnegie Mellon University, and fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin. His research focuses on applications of psychology to economics, and his specific interests include decision making over time,

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When I’m 64 bargaining and negotiations, psychology and health, law and economics, the psychology of adaptation, the role of emotion in decision making, the psychology of curiosity, conflict of interest, and “out of control” behaviors such as impulsive violent crime and drug addiction. Mara Mather is associate professor of psychology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is a cognitive psychologist whose research interests focus on aging, memory, emotion, and decision making. She completed her undergraduate degree at Stanford University and her Ph.D. at Princeton University. Dr. Mather has been examining how changes in emotional processing across the life span affect cognitive processes, such as attention, memory, and decision making. Dr. Mather also investigates how people remember and misremember past decisions. Denise C. Park is professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Illinois and a faculty member in the Biological Intelligence Group at the Beckman Institute. She directs the Center for Healthy Minds, an NIA-supported Roybal Center. Her fields of professional interest are the cognitive neuroscience of aging; culture, cognition, and aging; and the impact of social/cognitive interventions in minimizing neurobiological changes that occur with age. Dr. Park received the Distinguished Contribution Award to the Psychology of Aging from the American Psychological Association in 2003. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the Board of Directors of the American Psychological Society, past chair of the Board of Scientific Affairs of the American Psychological Association, and past president of the Division of Adult Development and Aging of the APA. Lawrence A. Pervin received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1962. He was professor of psychology at Rutgers University from 1971-2004 and is currently professor emeritus. He is the editor of The Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research (1st edition, 1990; 2nd edition, 1999), as well as author of Current Controversies and Issues in Personality (1st edition, 1978; 2nd edition, 1984; 3rd edition, 2001). Dr. Pervin also wrote the personality textbook Personality: Theory and Research, now in its ninth edition, and several of his books have been translated into eight foreign languages. Richard E. Petty received his B.A. from the University of Virginia in 1973, and his Ph.D. in social psychology from Ohio State University in 1977. He began his career as assistant professor of psychology at the University of Missouri, where he was named the Frederick A. Middlebush Professor in 1985. He returned to Ohio State in 1987 as professor and director of the

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When I’m 64 Social Psychology Doctoral Program. In 1998, he was named Distinguished University Professor. Dr. Petty’s research focuses broadly on the situational and individual difference factors responsible for changes in beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. This work has resulted in 7 books and over 200 journal articles and chapters. Dr. Petty has received several honors for his work including the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Awards from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2001) and the Society for Consumer Psychology (2000). Dr. Petty served as associate editor of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin for two years, and later became the journal’s editor from 1988-1991. He has also served as associate editor for the journal, Emotion, and has served on the editorial boards of 10 other journals. Dr. Petty has served as a consultant and panelist for various federal agencies such as the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the National Science Foundation, the National Cancer Institute, and also for the National Academy of Sciences. Jennifer A. Richeson is associate professor of psychology and a faculty fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. She received her B.S. in psychology at Brown University and her Ph.D. at Harvard University in social psychology. Dr. Richeson’s research focuses on prejudice, stereotyping, and intergroup relations. Her work generally concerns the ways in which social group memberships such as race and gender affect the way people think, feel, and behave during intergroup interactions. She is currently working on three primary lines of research: the dynamics and consequences of interracial contact; detecting and controlling racial bias; and racial categorization and identity. Through the development of these research streams, Dr. Richeson hopes to contribute to a better understanding of intergroup relations, as well as to elucidate pitfalls in current approaches to prejudice reduction. Alexander J. Rothman received his Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University and is currently associate professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Rothman’s primary program of research concerns the application of social psychological theory to illness prevention and health promotion and is comprised of a synthesis of basic research on how people process and respond to health information with the development and evaluation of theory-based interventions to promote healthy behavior. In his most recent work, Dr. Rothman has focused on how the relation between people’s health beliefs and health behavior unfolds over time. In particular, he has begun to delineate the different decision processes that guide the initiation and maintenance of long-term self-regulatory behavior. In recognition of his work, Dr. Rothman received the 2002 Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to

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When I’m 64 Psychology in the area of Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association. Norbert Schwarz is professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, professor of marketing at the University of Michigan Business School, and research professor in the Survey Research Center and the Research Center for Group Dynamics at Michigan’s Institute for Social Research. He received a Ph.D. in sociology and psychology from the University of Mannheim, Germany, in 1980. Prior to joining the University of Michigan in 1993, he taught psychology at the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1981-1992), and served as Scientific Director of ZUMA, a social science research center in Mannheim (1987-1992). Dr. Schwarz’s interests focus on human judgment and cognition, including the interplay of feeling and thinking, the socially situated nature of cognition, and the implications of basic cognitive and communicative processes for public opinion and social science research. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Psychological Society, and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. J. Nicole Shelton is assistant professor of psychology at Princeton University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1998. Her research focuses on interracial interaction, prejudice, and ethnic identity. She explores how interpersonal concerns about issues of prejudice (i.e., concerns with appearing prejudiced and concerns with being rejected) influence the dynamics of intergroup contact. Additionally, she has been exploring personality and situational factors that influence the development and maintenance of cross-racial friendships. She is also studying issues related to targets’ detection of and responses to prejudice and discrimination, and the personal and social costs of confronting, or not confronting, perpetrators of prejudice. Ilene C. Siegler is professor of medical psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychology: Social and Health Sciences, Duke University, and adjunct professor of epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. She is a developmental psychologist and behavioral epidemiologist whose research is at the intersection of the psychology of adult development and aging and behavioral medicine. Her research involves the understanding of behavioral factors in chronic disease. She is the director of the UNC Alumni Heart Study, a former member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute on Aging, past president of Division 20 (Adult Development and Aging) of the American Psychological Association, and former associate editor of Health Psychology.

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When I’m 64 Penny S. Visser is associate professor of psychology at the University of Chicago. She earned her undergraduate degree at Grand Valley State University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from Ohio State University. Dr. Visser was an assistant professor at Princeton University from 1998 through 2001, with a joint appointment in the Psychology Department and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. She joined the faculty at the University of Chicago in 2001. Dr. Visser is primarily interested in attitudes: how they influence the way we process information, how they motivate and guide our behavior, how they are influenced by the social context in which we hold them, and how we maintain them in the face of persuasive appeals. Linda J. Waite is the Lucy Flower Professor of Sociology and director of the Center on Aging at the University of Chicago, where she also co-directs the Alfred P. Sloan Center on Parents, Children and Work. She is past president of the Population Association of America and a member of the Advisory Committee to the Director of NIH. Her research focuses on the family, from the youngest to the oldest ages. She is author, with Frances Goldscheider, of New Families, No Families?: The Transformation of the American Home (University of California Press, 1991) and, with Maggie Gallagher, of The Case for Marriage: Why Married People are Happier, Healthier and Better Off Financially (Doubleday, 2000). One current project examines the role of the social context in the etiology of loneliness and stress, and their impact on health and well-being at older ages. Another project focuses on the relationship between social networks, intimacy, physical health, emotional well-being, and cognitive function at older ages. Keith E. Whitfield is associate professor in the Department of Biobehavioral Health at Pennsylvania State University. His current research focuses on individual differences in aging in African Americans. Dr. Whitfield has written about health disparities and minority aging, conceptual and methodological issues involving individual differences and aging in African Americans, and the effects of race and health on cognition. His current projects include a study of the impact of health and personality on cognitive functioning and a study of health and psychosocial factors in older African American twins. He served on the National Academies’ Committee on Future Directions for Cognitive Research on Aging.

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