B
Biographical Sketches of Board and Staff Members and Panel Rosters

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Members at Large

Kenneth H. Keller (Chair) is Charles M. Denny, Jr., Professor of Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. Professor Keller received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests in recent years have turned to issues at the nexus of science and technology and public policy. He has held various administrative positions at the University of Minnesota. He has also served on various bodies of the National Research Council: the Committee on Future Environments for the National Institute of Standards and Technology; the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications; the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable; the Committee to Review Proposals to the Bio-medical Research Technology Transfer Partnership Awards to the State of Ohio; the Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals; and the Committee on Global Networks and Local Values. Professor Keller is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.


David C. Bonner is managing partner, Pretium Consulting Services, LLC. His previous positions include those of vice president of research and development (R&D) and chief technology officer, Cabot Corporation; global director, Rohm and Haas Company’s Polymer Technology Center; senior vice president of Technology and Engineering, Westlake Group; senior vice president and chief technical officer, Premix; vice president of R&D, B.F. Goodrich; and associate professor of chemical engineering at Texas A&M University. Dr. Bonner has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Industrial Environment Performance Metrics and was a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.


Oscar N. Garcia is founding and current dean of the new College of Engineering at the University of North Texas. In his previous position, he was a Distinguished NCR Chair Professor in the Computer



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 B Biographical Sketches of Board and Staff Members and Panel Rosters BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES Members at Large Kenneth H. Keller (Chair) is Charles M. Denny, Jr., Professor of Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. Professor Keller received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests in recent years have turned to issues at the nexus of science and technology and public policy. He has held various administrative positions at the University of Minnesota. He has also served on various bodies of the National Research Council: the Committee on Future Environments for the National Institute of Standards and Technology; the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications; the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable; the Committee to Review Proposals to the Bio-medical Research Technology Transfer Partnership Awards to the State of Ohio; the Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals; and the Committee on Global Networks and Local Values. Professor Keller is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. David C. Bonner is managing partner, Pretium Consulting Services, LLC. His previous positions include those of vice president of research and development (R&D) and chief technology officer, Cabot Corporation; global director, Rohm and Haas Company’s Polymer Technology Center; senior vice president of Technology and Engineering, Westlake Group; senior vice president and chief technical officer, Premix; vice president of R&D, B.F. Goodrich; and associate professor of chemical engineering at Texas A&M University. Dr. Bonner has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Industrial Environment Performance Metrics and was a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. Oscar N. Garcia is founding and current dean of the new College of Engineering at the University of North Texas. In his previous position, he was a Distinguished NCR Chair Professor in the Computer

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 Science and Engineering Department at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Dean Garcia has an extensive career in academia, particularly in program development, and has held two directorships at the National Science Foundation. His recent research includes topics in complexity, bioinformatics, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, expert systems, and software engineering. His earlier areas of research are robust speech recognition, computer architecture and parallel processing, testing of digital circuits, and arithmetic coding theory. He holds a fellow membership in the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and has received the Merwin Award of the Computer Society and the Emberson Award of the IEEE. He is also a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dean Garcia received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the North Carolina State University and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. He is a past president of the IEEE Computer Society and has served on the IEEE board of directors. Dean Garcia is also a current member of the National Research Council (NRC) study on Directions of the AFOSR Mathematics and Analysis Committee. He previously served on a panel of the NRC’s Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. Anthony M. Johnson is currently director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research at the University of Maryland in Baltimore. He had previously been chair and Distinguished Professor of Physics at the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and before that served for 14 years as a member of the technical staff in the Photonic Circuits Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories, with distinction. Dr. Johnson holds a B.S. degree in physics from the Polytechnic University and a Ph.D. in physics from the City University of New York. He is well recognized in the physics community for his expertise in ultrafast photophysics and nonlinear optical properties of bulk, nanostructured, and quantum-well semiconductor structures; ultrashort pulse propagation in fibers; and high-speed light-wave systems. Among the distinctions that he holds are fellowships in five professional organizations and election as president of the Optical Society in 2000. He currently serves on the U.S. National Committee for the International Commission for Optics and previously served on three NRC committees. Mark B. Myers is an independent consultant. He retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 37-year career in its research and development organizations. He was the senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the Corporate Research Centers, such as the Palo Alto Research Center in California. During this period, he was also a member of the senior management committee in charge of setting the strategic direction for the company. Dr. Myers recently completed an appointment as the Walter C. Bladstrom Visiting Executive Professor in Entrepreneurial Management at the Wharton School (2004-2005), where his research interests included identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection and product development and technology competencies. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Earlham College and a doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. Thomas A. Saponas recently retired as senior vice president and chief technology officer of Agilent Technologies as well as director of Agilent Laboratories. His responsibilities included developing the company’s long-term technology strategy and overseeing the alignment of the company’s objectives with its centralized R&D activities. He has more than 27 years of experience in electrical engineering, refined over the course of his career with Hewlett-Packard Company, where he began in 1972 as a design engineer in the company’s Automatic Measurement Division and went on to become vice president and general manager of the Electronic Instruments Group. In 1986, he was selected to serve as

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 a White House fellow and served as special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy for a year, on leave from Hewlett-Packard. He earned a B.S. in electrical engineering and computer science and an M.S. in electrical engineering, both from the University of Colorado. Eugene Sevin is an independent consultant. His research interests are in nuclear and conventional weapons effects, blast-hardened facility design, and computational structural mechanics. He formerly served with the U.S. Department of Defense as deputy director, space and missile systems, and with the Defense Nuclear Agency as assistant to the deputy director (science and technology) for experimental research. Other positions that Dr. Sevin has held include professor of mechanical engineering at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology (IIT), and head of mechanical engineering at Ben Gurion University at Negev, Israel. He earned a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from IIT, an M.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from IIT. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He recently served as a member of the NRC Committee on Army S&T for Homeland Defense and has served on the NRC Committee on Oversight and Assessment of Blast-effects and Related Research. Ex Officio Members Panel for Building and Fire Research Ross B. Corotis (Chair) is the Denver Business Challenge Professor in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Dr. Corotis has a background in structural mechanics and stochastic vibrations; his primary research interests are in the application of probabilistic concepts to civil engineering problems. He has directed a number of research projects on subjects such as stochastic modeling of loads on structures, structural system reliability, wind characteristics for energy conversion systems, building loads, and mesoscale storm modeling. He was the founding chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University and dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Colorado. Dr. Corotis received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and editor of the American Society of Civil Engineers’ Journal of Engineering Mechanics. Robert J. Hitchcock (Vice Chair) is a staff research associate in the Building Technologies Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research interests are currently focused in two areas: those of daylighting simulation and of building life-cycle information management, which involves the development of a framework for documenting and communicating performance metrics, design intent, and design rationale across the life cycle of a building project. He received his Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He is chair of the North American Building Services Domain Committee of the International Alliance for Interoperability. Panel for Chemical Science and Technology Alan Campion (Chair) is Dow Chemical Company Professor and University Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests lie in the general area of surface physics and chemistry, with a particular focus on the spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on single-crystal surfaces. His laboratory is perhaps best known for

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 its pioneering work in surface Raman spectroscopy. Current work is focused on developing a mechanistic understanding of surface-enhanced Raman scattering on single-molecule Raman spectroscopy, and on the development of Raman near-field scanning optical microscopy. Professor Campion received a B.A. in chemistry from New College (Florida) and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of California at Los Angeles. He was a National Science Foundation National Needs Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, and Guggenheim Fellow, and he was awarded the Coblentz Memorial Prize in Molecular Spectroscopy in 1987. James R. Katzer (Vice Chair) is the manager for strategic planning and performance analysis at the Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering Company. His research interests are broad, covering several research areas performed in the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory. Examples are his research on chemical reactions and kinetics, catalysis, and reaction engineering. Dr. Katzer has also shown leadership in the successful commercialization of catalytic processes related to pollution abatement and emissions from alternative power sources. He holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Iowa State University and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Panel for Electronics and Electrical Engineering Constance J. Chang-Hasnain (Chair) is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California, Berkeley, and director of the Center for Optoelectronic Nanostructured Semiconductor Research and Technology, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Her research interests include nanostructured optoelectronic materials and devices, vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, and microelectromechanical systems for optoelectronics, optical communications, and sensing applications. Before coming to Berkeley in 1992, she spent 5 years at Bellcore. She received a B.S. from the University of California at Davis and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, all in electrical engineering. She has been a Packard fellow, a Sloan fellow, and a National Young Investigator. She received the 2000 Curtis W. McGraw Research Award from the American Society for Engineering Education, the 2003 IEEE William Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, and the 2005 Gilbreth Lecturer Award from the National Academy of Engineering. Professor Chang-Hasnain is a fellow of the IEEE, and the Optical Society of America and the IEE. She was elected an honorary member of A.F. Ioffe Institute in 2005. Robert R. Doering (Vice Chair) is a senior fellow in silicon technology development at Texas Instruments (TI). Currently, his primary area of responsibility at TI, where he has been working since 1980, is technology strategy. His previous positions at TI include those of manager of future-factory strategy, director of scaled-technology integration, and director of the microelectronics manufacturing science and technology program. Dr. Doering received a B.S. degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in physics from Michigan State University. He is co-chair of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and serves on the Corporate Associates Advisory Committee of the American Institute of Physics. He is a senior member of IEEE.

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 Panel for Information Technology Albert M. Erisman (Chair) is the director of the Institute for Business, Technology, and Ethics and founding editor of Ethix, a bimonthly publication dealing with business ethics in an age of technology. He retired from the Boeing Company in 2001; there he had been director of mathematics and computing technology, leading a staff of 250 to 300 people. He was also a Boeing senior technical fellow. His own research began in mathematical algorithms and mathematical software. His management focus included the linking of research and development with business requirements and the delivery of technology for business benefit. He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Northern Illinois University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Iowa State University. He has served as a member of several NRC committees—most recently the Committee on Information Technology Research in a Competitive World. C. William Gear (Vice Chair) is president emeritus of the NEC Research Institute. Prior to joining NEC, he was head of the Department of Computer Science and professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research expertise is in numerical analysis and computational software. He received a B.A. and an M.A. in mathematics from Cambridge and an M.S. and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Gear is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He served as president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He is past chair of the NRC Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and served on the NRC Committee on Future Environments for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Panel for Manufacturing Engineering Richard A. Curless (Chair) is vice president of engineering for Cincinnati Machine, a subsidiary of Cincinnati Lamb located in Hebron, Kentucky. Additionally, he serves as chief technical officer for Cincinnati Lamb, a UNOVA company, headquartered in Detroit, Michigan. His responsibilities include all engineering, research, product development, and technical support services for Cincinnati Lamb. He has 40 years of experience in the machine tool industry. His previous positions include vice president of engineering for LeBlond Makino, chief engineer and manager for Cincinnati Milacron, vice president of product and business development for Cincinnati Machine, and director of global R&D for Cincinnati Lamb. He has an engineering bachelor’s degree from the University of Cincinnati, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from Oklahoma State University, and an M.B.A. from Xavier University. He currently serves on various technical advisory boards and committees, including the TechSolve board of directors, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences board of directors, and the Technology Watch Committee of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Neil A. Duffie (Vice Chair) is a member of the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Professor Duffie’s research involves the development and optimization of several aspects of manufacturing systems. His approach centers on computer control, precision engineering computer-integrated manufacturing, micromechanisms, and robotics. He has constructed several experimental manufacturing systems that incorporate real-time, fully distributed scheduling and optimization into their control systems. He is developing theories to explain the properties and performance of these systems. Professor Duffie is associate director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics.

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 Panel for Materials Science and Engineering David W. Johnson, Jr. (Chair) retired from his position as director of the Materials Research Department at Agere Systems (previously part of Bell Laboratories) and continues as an adjunct professor of materials engineering at the Stevens Institute of Technology and as editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society. His expertise is in ceramic materials development and processing, specifically, powder preparation methods, magnetic devices, and optical fiber glasses. His research has focused on bulk and thin-film fabrication and processing of functional materials for wireless and optical communications technologies. Dr. Johnson was awarded a B.S. and Ph.D. in ceramic science from the Pennsylvania State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow and past president of the American Ceramic Society. In 2000, he received the International Ceramics Prize from the Academy of Ceramics. Katharine G. Frase (Vice Chair) is director of World Wide Packaging Development for the IBM Microelectronics Division. She is responsible for all process development and design/modeling methodology for organic and ceramic chip packaging for IBM. Her research interests include mechanical properties/structural interactions in composites, high-temperature superconductors, solid electrolytes (fast ionic conductors), ceramic powder synthetic methods, and ceramic packaging. Dr. Frase received her B.A. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and her Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. She chaired an IBM/NRC workshop on lead solder reduction actions, and in 1998 served as the packaging assurance manager for IBM worldwide. Eric W. Kaler (Vice Chair) is dean of the College of Engineering and Elizabeth Inez Kelley Professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware. His research interests are in colloid and surfactant science, complex fluid dynamics, materials synthesis, and small-angle scattering. He holds a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, both in chemical engineering. Dr. Kaler was a Presidential Young Investigator, and he received the 1998 American Chemical Society Award in Colloid or Surface Chemistry. He is co-editor-in-chief of Current Opinion in Colloid and Interface Science. Panel for Physics Duncan T. Moore (Chair) is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake Professor of Optical Engineering and professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Rochester. From 2002 until 2004, he served as president and chief executive officer of the Infotonics Technology Center, Inc. From the fall of 1997 to December 2000, Dr. Moore served in the position of associate director for technology in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). In this position, he worked on technology policy, including that related to the Next Generation Internet, Clean Car Initiative, technology for elders, crime technologies, and NASA. From January through May 2001, he served as special adviser to the acting director of OSTP. Dr. Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and governmental areas of science and technology. He is an expert in gradient-index optics, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems. He is the founder and former president of Gradient Lens Corporation of Rochester, New York, a company that manufactures the high-quality, low-cost Hawkeye borescope. In 1996, Dr. Moore served as president of the Optical Society of America (OSA). From January 2001 to the present, he has served as senior science adviser at OSA. In 1999, he received the

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 National Engineering Award of the American Association of Engineering Societies. He was the recipient of the 2001 OSA Leadership Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Arthur H. Guenther (Vice Chair) holds a Ph.D. in chemical physics from Rutgers University and is presently on the faculty of the University of New Mexico in the Center for High Technology Materials. His experience includes distinguished research in physics and various advisory positions in academia, as well as at three national laboratories. Dr. Guenther is a leading expert on directed-energy weaponry, including lasers, microwaves, particle beams, and pulsed-power technology. His work in nuclear weapons simulation was concerned with the response of materials to adverse environments. Dr. Guenther is the recipient of numerous awards and was science adviser to three governors of New Mexico. He is an active consultant to Department of Defense organizations, Department of Energy national laboratories, and other groups. Staff James P. McGee is director of the Board on Assessment of NIST Programs and director of the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board (ARLTAB), both in the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences of the National Research Council (NRC). Since 1994, Dr. McGee has been a senior staff officer at the NRC, directing projects in the areas of systems engineering and applied psychology. These project included studies by the Committee on National Statistics’ Committee on Assessing the National Science Foundation’s Scientists and Engineers Statistical Data System and its Panel on Operational Testing and Evaluation of the Stryker Vehicle; the Panel on Soldier Systems for ARLTAB; the Committee on the Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers; and the Steering Committee on Differential Susceptibility of Older Persons to Environmental Hazards. He has also served as staff officer for NRC projects on Air Traffic Control Automation, Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace, and the Changing Nature of Work. Prior to joining the NRC, Dr. McGee held technical and management positions in systems engineering and applied psychology at IBM, General Electric, RCA, General Dynamics, and United Technologies corporations. He received a B.A. from Princeton University and a Ph.D. from Fordham University, both in psychology, and for several years instructed postsecondary courses in applied psychology and in organizational management. Patricia P. Paulette is a senior program officer in the NRC Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences. She has been associated with the Board on Assessment of NIST Programs for 2 years. Prior to that time, Dr. Paulette was study director for the NRC Board on Army Science and Technology, and she staffed a congressionally mandated study providing technical support to the Department of Defense in its efforts to destroy chemical-agent-containing weapons stored by the Army. Before joining the NRC, Dr. Paulette spent 20 years at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where she conducted original research, provided technical support to U.S. Marine and Navy field operations, managed scientific programs, and provided technical and administrative assistance to the NRL director of research. She has also been a member of the chemistry faculty at the George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Dr. Paulette’s areas of technical expertise are in electrochemistry, materials, optics, and surface chemistry; she has more than 70 technical presentations and publications in these fields. Dr. Paulette holds a B.A. degree in chemistry from Barnard College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, also in chemistry, from the American University. She is a member of the American Chemical Society, the Electrochemical Society, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, and Phi Kappa Phi.

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 PANEL ROSTERS Panel for Building and Fire Research Ross B. Corotis, University of Colorado, Boulder, Chair Robert J. Hitchcock, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Vice Chair Craig L. Beyler, Hughes Associates, Inc. Donald B. Bivens, DuPont Fluorochemicals Randy R. Bruegman, Fire Chief, City of Fresno Joseph P. Colaco, CBM Engineers, Inc. Raymond A. Dickie, Allen and Dickie Consultants Martin Fischer, Stanford University Delon Hampton, Delon Hampton and Associates Kristin H. Heinemeier, Portland Energy Conservation Susan D. Landry, Albemarle Corporation John W. Mitchell, University of Wisconsin, Madison Adel F. Sarofim, University of Utah George W. Scherer, Princeton University Jim W. Sealy, Consultant, Dallas William Secre, Master Builders, Inc. (resigned from panel in 2004) Frieder Seible, University of California, San Diego E. Sarah Slaughter, MOCA Systems, Inc. Panel for Chemical Science and Technology Alan Campion, University of Texas, Austin, Chair James R. Katzer, Exxon Mobile Research and Engineering (retired), Vice Chair John Ball, U.S. Army Primary Standards Laboratory Jeffrey B. Bindell, University of Central Florida Ulrich Bonne, Honeywell Laboratories Joan Brennecke, University of Notre Dame Antonio Cantu, U.S. Secret Service Ruby Ghosh, Michigan State University John W. Kozarich, ActivX Biosciences, Inc. Max G. Lagally, University of Wisconsin, Madison R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University James D. Olson, Dow Chemical Company Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulos, Princeton University Gregory Stephanopoulos, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Jennifer West, Rice University Peter Wilding, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center Jerome J. Workman, Jr., Thermo Electron Corporation Panel for Electronics and Electrical Engineering Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley, Chair

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 Robert R. Doering, Texas Instruments, Vice Chair James A. Bain, Carnegie Mellon University Andrew A. Berlin, Intel Corporation Peter J. Delfyett, University of Central Florida Michael Ettenberg, Suzmar, LLC Bruce E. Gnade, University of Texas, Dallas Thomas J. Gramila, Ohio State University Katherine L. Hall, Wide Net Technologies Paul S. Ho, University of Texas, Austin (resigned from panel in 2004) Robert C. McDonald, Metara, Inc. G. Bruce Melson, GE Aircraft Engines Steve Newton, Agilent Technologies, Inc. Terry P. Orlando, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Ghery S. Pettit, NCE, Intel Corporation Douglas K. Rytting, Agilent Technologies, Inc. (retired) Robert Schoelkopf, Yale University Jonathan Scott, Agilent Technologies, Inc. Yuan Taur, University of California, San Diego Ronald Waxman, EDA Standards Consulting H. Lee Willis, KEMA T&D Consulting Barry M. Wood, National Research Council Canada Panel for Information Technology Albert M. Erisman, Institute for Business, Technology, and Ethics, Chair C. William Gear, NEC Research Institute, Inc., Vice Chair Richard Bakalar, IBM Corporation Robert Blakley, Tivoli Systems, Inc. John Boot, Motorola Corporation Linda Branagan, Secondlook Consulting Jack Brassil, Hewlett-Packard Laboratories James A. Calvin, Texas A&M University Susan T. Dumais, Microsoft Research David Goodman, Brooklyn Polytechnic University Eric Grosse, Bell Laboratories–Lucent Technologies Cyndi Jung, Motorola Corporation Sallie Keller-McNulty, Los Alamos National Laboratory (resigned from panel in 2004) Stephen Kent, BBN Technologies Isaac S. Kohane, Children’s Hospital James M. Landwehr, Avaya Labs William A. Massey, Princeton University Lawrence O’Gorman, Avaya Labs David Oran, Cisco Systems, Inc. Friedrich-Wilhelm (Fritz) Scholz, Boeing Company Jeffrey D. Ullman, Stanford University Stephen A. Vavasis, Cornell University

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 Samaradasa Weerahandi, AOL Time Warner (resigned from panel in 2004) Mary Ellen Zurko, IBM Software Group Panel for Manufacturing Engineering Richard A. Curless, Cincinnati Lamb, Chair Neil A. Duffie, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Vice Chair Alice Agogino, University of California, Berkeley Christopher P. Ausschnitt, IBM Microelectronics Division Marylyn H. Bennett, International SEMATECH Delcie R. Durham, National Science Foundation Richard J. Furness, Ford Motor Company Marion B. Grant, Jr., Caterpillar, Inc. David E. Hardt, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Steven W. Holland, General Motors R&D Center Michael Jahadi, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Mark C. Malburg, Digital Metrology Solutions, Inc. Carmen Pancerella, Sandia National Laboratories Jay Ramanathan, Ohio State University Wolfgang H. Sachse, Cornell University Arthur C. Sanderson, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Peter M. Will, Information Sciences Institute/University of Southern California David H. Youden, Eastman Kodak Company (resigned from panel in 2004) Panel for Materials Science and Engineering David W. Johnson, Jr., Agere Systems, Chair Katharine G. Frase, IBM Microelectronics Division, Vice Chair Eric W. Kaler, University of Delaware, Vice Chair (until May 2005) Ian S. Anderson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Edmund W. Chu, Alcoa, Inc. Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Kenneth L. Davis, Arizona State University Lisa Dhar, InPhase Technologies F.W. Gordon Fearon, Dow Corning Corporation (retired) Zachary Fisk, University of California, Davis Elizabeth G. Jacobs, Texas Instruments Sylvia M. Johnson, NASA-Ames Research Center Lee J. Magid, University of Tennessee (resigned from panel in 2004) Omkaram Nalamasu, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Thomas X. Neenan, Trine Pharmaceuticals V. Adrian Parsegian, National Institutes of Health Philip Pincus, University of California at Santa Barbara Ainissa Ramirez, Yale University Kenneth Rogers, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (retired) Kathleen Taylor, General Motors Corporation (retired)

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 King-Ning Tu, University of California, Los Angeles Mark Weaver, University of Alabama Robert L. White, Stanford University Barbara Wyslouzil, Ohio State University Panel for Physics Duncan T. Moore, University of Rochester, Chair Arthur H. Guenther, University of New Mexico, Vice Chair Robert H. Austin, Princeton University Patricia A. Baisden, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Robert P. Breault, Breault Research Organizations, Inc. John H. Bruning, Corning Tropel Corporation Albert W. Castleman, Jr., Pennsylvania State University John F. Dicello, Johns Hopkins University R. Michael Garvey, Symmetricom Daniel R. Grischkowsky, Oklahoma State University Lene Vestergaard Hau, Harvard University Tony F. Heinz, Columbia University Franz J. Himpsel, University of Wisconsin, Madison Barbara Jones, IBM Almaden Research Center Lute Maleki, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Robert T. Menzies, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Dennis M. Mills, Argonne National Laboratory James M. Palmer, University of Arizona William N. Partlo, Cymer, Inc. David R. Schultz, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Robert M. Shelby, IBM Corporation William C. Stwalley, University of Connecticut David A. Vroom, Tyco Electronics Deborah K. Watson, University of Oklahoma

OCR for page 103
An Assessment of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Measurement and Standards Laboratories: Fiscal Years 2004 – 2005 This page intentionally left blank.