Appendix A
WORKSHOP AGENDA

Applications of Toxicogenomics to Cross-Species Extrapolation: A Workshop

Despite the dependence on animal models in toxicologic research for predicting human health effects in the regulatory arena, there can be significant differences between how animals and humans respond to different chemicals. This workshop will consider promises and limitations in using emerging high-throughput approaches, such as genotyping (genomics), mRNA analysis (transcriptomics), protein analysis (proteomics), and metabolite analysis (metabolomics), to inform cross-species extrapolation.

Thursday, August 12th 2004

9:00 am

Welcome and Overview of the Workshop, including what is meant by “Cross-Species Extrapolation”—Leigh Anderson/ David Eaton

9:10 am

Richard Di Giulio, Duke University

Highlights from a Recent Pellston Workshop on Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolation



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Application of Toxicogenomics to Cross-Species Extrapolation Appendix A WORKSHOP AGENDA Applications of Toxicogenomics to Cross-Species Extrapolation: A Workshop Despite the dependence on animal models in toxicologic research for predicting human health effects in the regulatory arena, there can be significant differences between how animals and humans respond to different chemicals. This workshop will consider promises and limitations in using emerging high-throughput approaches, such as genotyping (genomics), mRNA analysis (transcriptomics), protein analysis (proteomics), and metabolite analysis (metabolomics), to inform cross-species extrapolation. Thursday, August 12th 2004 9:00 am Welcome and Overview of the Workshop, including what is meant by “Cross-Species Extrapolation”—Leigh Anderson/ David Eaton 9:10 am Richard Di Giulio, Duke University Highlights from a Recent Pellston Workshop on Emerging Molecular and Computational Approaches for Cross-Species Extrapolation

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Application of Toxicogenomics to Cross-Species Extrapolation 9:35 am William Benson, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Potential Implications of Genomics for Regulatory and Risk Assessment Applications at EPA 10:00 am Discussion of Issues Raised by Di Giulio and Benson 10:30 am BREAK 10:40 am Frank Witzmann, Indiana University Technological Challenges of Cross-Species Extrapolation Using Proteomics 11:10 am Donna Mendrick, Gene Logic Modeling Gene Expression Data to Predict Human Hepatotoxicity Following Inconsistent Animal Responses 11:40 am Discussion of Talks 12:00 pm LUNCH 1:00 pm Susan Sumner, Paradigm Genetics Using Metabolomics/-omics to Explore Species Differences in Metabolism and Distribution 1:30 pm Russell Thomas, CIIT Centers for Health Research A Systems Biology Approach to Cross-Species Extrapolation 2:00 pm Discussion of Talks 2:20 pm BREAK 2:30 pm Stephen Nesnow, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Combining Transcriptional and Toxicologic Approaches to Understanding the Basis of Species Differences in Conazole Carcinogenesis 3:00 pm John Butenhoff, 3M Co. Species Differences in Response to Perfluorooctanoic Acid 3:30 pm Discussion of Talks

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Application of Toxicogenomics to Cross-Species Extrapolation 3:50 pm BREAK 4:00 pm Roundtable Discussion—questions such as: • “Once a molecular basis for understanding a species differences has been established, what are the challenges to incorporating -omics information about species differences into the regulatory framework?” • “What are the advantages to using -omics compared to other approaches for detecting or explaining cross-species differences?” • “How much data are sufficient for arguing that a particular mode of action is most relevant to humans?” 5:00 pm ADJOURN