Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Paul R. Sackett (Chair) is professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His research interests revolve around legal, psychometric, and policy aspects of psychological testing, assessment, and personnel decision making in workplace settings. He has served as the editor of Personnel Psychology, as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, as cochair of the Joint Committee on the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment, and as chair of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Scientific Affairs. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Ohio State University.


David J. Armor is professor of public policy in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, where he served as director of the Ph.D. program from 2002 to 2005. He teaches graduate courses in multivariate statistics and social policy and conducts research in education, military manpower, and family policy. He began his research in military manpower while at the Rand Corporation, and between 1986 and 1989 he served as principal deputy and acting assistant secretary for force management and personnel in the U.S. Department of Defense. While at Rand and the Department of Defense, he contributed to the Job Performance Measurement Project and subsequent efforts to validate enlistment standards for education and aptitudes. He was also a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Military Enlistment Standards. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University.



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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Paul R. Sackett (Chair) is professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. His research interests revolve around legal, psychometric, and policy aspects of psychological testing, assessment, and personnel decision making in workplace settings. He has served as the editor of Personnel Psychology, as president of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, as cochair of the Joint Committee on the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing, as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment, and as chair of the American Psychological Association’s Board of Scientific Affairs. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Ohio State University. David J. Armor is professor of public policy in the School of Public Policy at George Mason University, where he served as director of the Ph.D. program from 2002 to 2005. He teaches graduate courses in multivariate statistics and social policy and conducts research in education, military manpower, and family policy. He began his research in military manpower while at the Rand Corporation, and between 1986 and 1989 he served as principal deputy and acting assistant secretary for force management and personnel in the U.S. Department of Defense. While at Rand and the Department of Defense, he contributed to the Job Performance Measurement Project and subsequent efforts to validate enlistment standards for education and aptitudes. He was also a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Military Enlistment Standards. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University.

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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards Noreen M. Clark is dean of the School of Public Health and Marshall H. Becker professor of public health at the University of Michigan. Her research specialty concerns the social and behavioral aspects of chronic disease management. She uses asthma and heart disease as models to explore elements of self-regulation, including a patient’s ability to observe, judge, and react appropriately to his or her own efforts to manage disease. She has also conducted large-scale trials of behavioral and educational interventions in clinical and community settings aimed at improving disease management by patients, families, and health care providers. She serves as national program director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Allies Against Asthma Program. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, former president of the Society for Public Health Education, and former editor of Health Education and Behavior. She has a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Mark J. Eitelberg is professor of public policy at the Naval Postgraduate School. Recently, he was a visiting research collaborator with the Office of Population Research, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University. He is former editor of the journal, Armed Forces & Society. He has worked with a number of agencies, commissions, and private organizations, including the Human Resources Research Organization (as senior scientist for eight years), the Brookings Institution, the Rand Corporation, the Technical Cooperation Program (an international consortium of defense scientists), and the National Research Council’s Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance, among others. An author and editor of numerous publications, he is editing a four-book set, Americans in Arms. He has M.P.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Wagner School of Public Service at New York University. Barbara C. Hansen is professor of internal medicine and director of the Obesity, Diabetes and Aging Research Center at the College of Medicine of the University of South Florida. Her work focuses on the relationships between overweight and diabetes, examining their causes from the perspective of defective conditions in the body, its cells, and even its molecules. For more than a dozen years, her research group has been conducting a study to see if a weight control regimen can prevent middle-age diabetes and extend life span. A member of the Institute of Medicine, she has served as an adviser and consultant to many other leading scientific societies and organizations, including the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. She has authored numerous scientific

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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards papers as well as the book, A Common Sense Guide to Weight Loss for People with Diabetes. She served on the Institute of Medicine’s Subcommittee on Military Weight Management Programs. She has a Ph.D. in physiology and psychology from the University of Washington. Paul F. Hogan is vice president and senior economist at The Lewin Group in Fairfax, Virginia. He has more than 20 years of experience in applying microeconomics, statistics, and operations research methods to problems in labor economics, including labor supply and demand, efficient staffing methods, and performance and cost measurement. He served as the senior analyst on the President’s Military Manpower Task Force and as director of manpower planning and analysis in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the office charged with staffing methods and criteria used by military departments to determine demands for personnel. He was awarded the Secretary of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service medal in 1982 and 1985, and the Navy Superior Civilian Service medal in 1980. His doctoral studies include economics, econometrics, and finance at the University of Rochester and his undergraduate degree is in economics from the University of Virginia. William S. Marras is a professor of industrial and systems engineering at the Ohio State University. He is the director of the university’s Biodynamics Laboratory and codirector of the Institute for Ergonomics. He also is the recipient of the Honda endowed chair in transportation research. He holds academic appointments in the Department of Industrial, Welding, and Systems Engineering, the Department of Physical Medicine, and the Biomedical Engineering Center. His research involves industrial biomechanics issues, laboratory biomechanics studies, mathematical modeling, and clinical studies of the back and wrist. He was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace and is currently a member of the Committee on Human Factors. He has an M.S. in engineering and a Ph.D. in bioengineering and ergonomics from Wayne State University. Stephen W. Marshall is assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with joint appointments in the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health and the Department of Orthopedics in the School of Medicine. His main area of research is injury prevention, occupational injury, biostatistics, epidemiological methods, and epidemiological data analysis. He is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Public Health Association, and the Society for Epidemiologic Research. Before coming to the University of North Carolina in 1994, he worked in the Injury Prevention Research Unit

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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, and at the Wellington School of Medicine in New Zealand. He has a Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Anne S. Mavor (Study Director) is the staff director for the Committee on Human Factors and the Committee on the Youth Population and Military Recruitment. Her previous National Research Council work has included studies on occupational analysis and the enhancement of human performance, modeling human behavior and command decision making, human factors in air traffic control automation, human factors considerations in tactical display for soldiers, scientific and technological challenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, and modeling cost and performance for purposes of military enlistment. For the past 25 years, her work has concentrated on human factors, cognitive psychology, and information system design. She has an M.S. in experimental psychology from Purdue University. Russell R. Pate is a professor of exercise physiology in the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina. His scholarly work has focused primarily on the relationships between physical activity and health in children and adolescents. He has served as president of the American College of Sports Medicine and as chairman of the Physical Fitness Council of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance and has been recognized with scholar awards from both organizations. He has a Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the University of Oregon. Garrison Rapmund is a board-certified pediatrician and senior fellow of the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University. He has spent his entire career in biomedical research. He was the assistant surgeon general of the U.S. Army for Research and Development and retired in the grade of major general. From his role as a scientific adviser at the National Institutes of Health, the Federal Aviation Administration, and national laboratories of the Department of Energy, he has extensive knowledge of biological science activities in the civilian sector. For 10 years Rapmund was also a member of a review panel concerned with technology transfer and commercialization of technology from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization to the life sciences. He served for six years on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, where he was chair of the human systems panel. He also serves as an external adviser to the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University. He was awarded the Joseph E. Smadel Medal of the Infectious Diseases Society of America for his military field research on mite-borne typhus in Asia. He is

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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards a graduate of Harvard University and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. Thomas L. Schwenk is professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan and associate director of the University of Michigan Depression Center. His research focuses on psychiatric issues in primary care, including the delivery of mental health services in primary care. He has also studied the incorporation of the behavioral sciences in primary care training, the nature of difficult physician-patient relationships, and the care of patients with chronic pain and chronic fatigue. He is involved in associated translation and dissemination work regarding psychiatric epidemiology and the role of primary care in the mental health care system, including consultations with the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Board of Family Medicine. A member of the Institute of Medicine, he is board-certified in family medicine and sports medicine and has additional interests in psychiatric issues in athletes and the promotion of exercise as a therapeutic agent in chronic disease. He has an M.D. from the University of Michigan. William J. Strickland is vice president of the Human Resources Research Organization (HumRRO) in Alexandria, Virginia. He also directs its Workforce Analysis and Training Systems Division. He is a retired Air Force colonel who was director of human resources research at the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory. In that position, he was responsible for all Air Force research in the areas of manpower and personnel, education and training, simulation and training devices, and logistics. Earlier in his career, he commanded an Air Force recruiting squadron, was the chief of market research for Air Force recruiting, and was the deputy director for operations for Air Force recruiting. A fellow of the American Psychological Association, he is a past president of its Division of Military Psychology. He has a Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the Ohio State University. Stephen B. Thomas is the Philip Hallen professor of community health and social justice and director of the Center for Minority Health in the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. In 1998, he was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Reducing the Odds: Preventing Perinatal Transmission of HIV in the United States. In 1997, he was an invited guest at the White House ceremony for the presidential apology to survivors of the syphilis study at Tuskegee. Over the past 15 years, he has applied his expertise in behavioral science and health education in the African American community. His work has addressed the translation of evidence-based public health science into cul-

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Assessing Fitness for Military Enlistment: Physical, Medical, and Mental Health Standards turally competent community-based interventions. He is on the board of directors of the Center for the Advancement of Health and the National Advisory Council for Active Living by Design, sponsored by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In 2004, he was awarded the Alonzo Smyth Yerby Award by the Harvard University School of Public Health for his contributions toward the elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities. He has a Ph.D. (1985) from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. Karen Dineen Wagner is the Robert L. Stubblefield professor in child psychiatry, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Texas Medical Branch. Her research focuses on the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. She has authored numerous scientific papers in leading psychiatric journals. She is a member of the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the National Institutes of Health, as well as other scientific and professional organizations. In 2004, she was awarded an honorary doctorate from the State University of New York for her accomplishments in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. She has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Temple University and an M.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She completed her residency in psychiatry at Beth Israel Hospital and a fellowship in child and adolescent psychiatry at McLean Hospital, both with Harvard Medical School.

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