D
Biographies of Panel Members and Staff

MARY JANE OSBORN, Chair, is professor of molecular, microbial, and structural biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Her fields of specialization are microbial biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology. Current research interests include mechanisms of cell division in Escherichia coli. Dr. Osborn is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board, the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (chair, 1983-1985), and the NAS Council. In addition, Dr. Osborn has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine (chair, 1994-2000), and the Space Studies Board (1994-2000).


PORTONOVO S. AYYASWAMY is the Asa Whitney Professor of Dynamical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. His current research projects focus on direct-contact heat and mass transfer, cell culturing in simulated microgravity conditions, transport in biological systems on macroscopic and microscopic levels, plasma arc heat transfer and applications in semi-conductor integrated chip technology, and non-Newtonian flows in die bonding. Dr. Ayyaswamy received the 2001 American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Heat Transfer Memorial Award in the science category “for many seminal contributions to such diverse fields of heat transfer as phase-change, plasma, bio, and natural convection, in particular to transport processes with the moving droplets and the thermal design of advanced industrial equipment.” He is also the recipient of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Award–Aerospace Professional of the Year in 1997 “for outstanding contributions to the advancement of the Arts and Sciences of Aeronautics and Astronautics.” As a professor of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, he has conducted extensive research on phase-change transport phenomena and has co-authored the monograph Transport Phenomena with Drops and Bubbles. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.


JAMES P. BAGIAN is the chief patient safety officer and the director of the Veterans Administration National Center for Patient Safety. Dr. Bagian has expertise in the development and implementation of interdisciplinary programs and projects involving engineering, medical sciences, and human factors disciplines. Dr. Bagian served as a NASA astronaut from 1980 to 1995 and is a veteran of two space shuttle missions. He also was an investigator for both the Challenger and Columbia missions. Dr. Bagian focuses on applications in aerospace systems, environmental technology, and patient safetynotably crew survival and physiological adaptation issues that impact aviation and spaceflight operations. He also investigates how systems-based solutions can be implemented and the role of leadership in ensuring patient safety and the quality of care. Dr. Bagian is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He currently serves on the IOM Committee on NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap and previously served as chair of the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine and member of the Space Studies Board (1995-1997 and 2000-2003), and as chair of the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station (2001-2003).



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Review of NASA Plans for the International Space Station D Biographies of Panel Members and Staff MARY JANE OSBORN, Chair, is professor of molecular, microbial, and structural biology at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Her fields of specialization are microbial biochemistry, microbiology, and molecular biology. Current research interests include mechanisms of cell division in Escherichia coli. Dr. Osborn is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She has served on numerous distinguished committees, including the National Science Board, the President’s Committee on the National Medal of Sciences, the Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health’s Division of Research Grants (chair, 1992-1994), the Advisory Council of the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology, the Board of Scientific Advisors for the Roche Institute for Molecular Biology (chair, 1983-1985), and the NAS Council. In addition, Dr. Osborn has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine (chair, 1994-2000), and the Space Studies Board (1994-2000). PORTONOVO S. AYYASWAMY is the Asa Whitney Professor of Dynamical Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. His current research projects focus on direct-contact heat and mass transfer, cell culturing in simulated microgravity conditions, transport in biological systems on macroscopic and microscopic levels, plasma arc heat transfer and applications in semi-conductor integrated chip technology, and non-Newtonian flows in die bonding. Dr. Ayyaswamy received the 2001 American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Heat Transfer Memorial Award in the science category “for many seminal contributions to such diverse fields of heat transfer as phase-change, plasma, bio, and natural convection, in particular to transport processes with the moving droplets and the thermal design of advanced industrial equipment.” He is also the recipient of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Award–Aerospace Professional of the Year in 1997 “for outstanding contributions to the advancement of the Arts and Sciences of Aeronautics and Astronautics.” As a professor of mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, he has conducted extensive research on phase-change transport phenomena and has co-authored the monograph Transport Phenomena with Drops and Bubbles. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. JAMES P. BAGIAN is the chief patient safety officer and the director of the Veterans Administration National Center for Patient Safety. Dr. Bagian has expertise in the development and implementation of interdisciplinary programs and projects involving engineering, medical sciences, and human factors disciplines. Dr. Bagian served as a NASA astronaut from 1980 to 1995 and is a veteran of two space shuttle missions. He also was an investigator for both the Challenger and Columbia missions. Dr. Bagian focuses on applications in aerospace systems, environmental technology, and patient safetynotably crew survival and physiological adaptation issues that impact aviation and spaceflight operations. He also investigates how systems-based solutions can be implemented and the role of leadership in ensuring patient safety and the quality of care. Dr. Bagian is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He currently serves on the IOM Committee on NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap and previously served as chair of the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine and member of the Space Studies Board (1995-1997 and 2000-2003), and as chair of the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station (2001-2003).

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Review of NASA Plans for the International Space Station ELIZABETH CANTWELL is the deputy division leader for science and technology in the International, Space and Response Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. She previously served as section leader for the Micro and Nanotechnology Center, Lawrence Livermore’s engineering research center for fabricating small sensors and devices. She earned an undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Chicago and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. She also holds an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business. Dr. Cantwell began her career building life support systems for crewed space missions with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She was a member of the NRC Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space (1996-1997) and of the IOM Committee on Review of NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap (2004-2005). MICHAEL J. ECONS directs the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at Indiana University. Dr. Econs has used a combination of clinical and molecular research to substantially advance the field of metabolic bone disease. His contributions to this effort include the identification of the genes responsible for X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets and autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets. He has also made contributions to the understanding of the genetics of osteoporosis and autosomal dominant osteopetrosis. He is a member of the Central Society for Clinical Investigation and the American Society for Clinical Investigation and has lectured on various topics in metabolic bone disease at numerous academic institutions and medical/scientific meetings. TOMMY W. HOLLOWAY retired in 2002 as manager of the International Space Station Program Office for NASA’s Johnson Space Center. Mr. Holloway was named space station manager in April 1999 after serving as manager of the space shuttle program for nearly 4 years. He began his career with NASA in 1963, planning activities for Gemini and Apollo flights at what was then known as the Manned Spacecraft Center. He was a flight director in Mission Control for early space shuttle flights and became chief of the office in 1985. In 1989, he was named assistant director for the Space Shuttle Program for the Mission Operations Directorate. He served as deputy manager for program integration with the Space Shuttle Program and director of the Phase I Program of Shuttle-Mir dockings before being named space shuttle program manager in August 1995. He served on the NRC Committee on Assessment of Options for Extending the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope (2004-2005). HERMAN J. MERTE, JR., is professor emeritus in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Michigan. His research interests involve heat transfer, including dynamics of phase change, boiling, and condensation; study of boiling heat transfer (pool and flow) in microgravity; and heat transfer in wire bundles. Dr. Merte has been involved in heat transfer research related to phase changes of boiling and condensation under reduced- and high-gravity fields since 1957. This included boiling (pool) of water and liquid nitrogen at up to 20 g, of water at up to 300 g, of mercury at 300 psi and up to 15 g, of liquid hydrogen in a 1.4-second drop tower; and dropwise and film condensation of water at up to 1,000 g. Since 1984 this included flow boiling of R-113 at various levels of heat flux and liquid subcooling, at various flow velocities, and various orientations relative to Earth’s gravity field; and pool boiling of R-113 at various levels of heat flux and subcooling in long-term microgravity (2 minutes per condition) in the GAS on the space shuttle, for 5 flights, and a total of 45 experiments. JAMES PAWELCZYK is a physiologist at Pennsylvania State University. He was a payload specialist on Space Transportation System-90 (Neurolab) and flew in 1998 with a focus on neuroscience. Dr. Pawelczyk was a member of the NASA Life Sciences Advisory Subcommittee in the Office of Biological and Physical Research. He was a member of the ReMaP Task Force (2002), charged with reprioritizing research on the International Space Station. He has received NASA funding as an individual principal investigator, as a project leader on center grants, and in contracts (including international collaboration) since 1993. Dr. Pawelczyk’s research areas include central neural control of the cardiovascular system and compensatory mechanisms for conditioning and deconditioning. He is knowledgeable about NASA

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Review of NASA Plans for the International Space Station and spaceflight operations and has medical expertise in the effects of space travel on human systems. He is currently a member of the IOM Committee on NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. JAMES G. QUINTIERE is the John L. Bryan Professor of Fire Protection Engineering at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has more than 35 years’ experience in fire research. Dr. Quintiere has conducted research in the study of fire growth in structures and on materials, developed test methods for ignition and flame spread, studied smoke movement in full-scale and scale model systems, and has developed theoretical solutions and simulation models for fire behavior and material response to fire. He has more than 100 publications in the field and is a former chair and founding member of the International Association for Fire Safety Science. He received the U.S. Department of Commerce Bronze Medal (1976) and Silver Medal (1982) as well as the Howard W. Emmons Lecture Award from the IAFSS in 1986. He is a fellow of the Society of Fire Prevention Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is author of Principles of Fire Behavior and co-author of Enclosure Fire Dynamics, and he has completed a draft Fundamentals of Fire Phenomenon for John Wiley. DENNIS W. READEY is the Herman F. Coors Distinguished Professor of Ceramic Engineering in the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department and director of the Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics at the Colorado School of Mines. Previously he served as chair of the Department of Ceramic Engineering at Ohio State University and as a program manager in the Division of Physical Research of what is now the Department of Energy, where he was responsible for funding research on ceramic materials in universities and national laboratories. He was also group leader of the basic ceramics group at Argonne National Laboratory and a group leader in the research division of the Raytheon Company. He is a fellow and past-president of the American Ceramic Society and a fellow of the American Society of Metals International, has served on the board of directors of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, and currently is on the board of directors of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Dr. Readey’s current research interests include gaseous and aqueous corrosion of ceramics, the effect of atmospheres on sintering, the properties of porous ceramics, processing and properties of ceramic-metal composites, fuel cell materials, and electronic properties of oxide compounds. Dr. Readey is chair of the NRC Committee on Microgravity Research and is a member of the Space Studies Board. DANNY A. RILEY is a professor of cellular biology and anatomy in the Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, and Anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Riley’s primary projects involve the skeletal muscle weakness and injury experienced by astronauts returning to Earth and the loss of sensation and blood flow to the human hand following prolonged use of power tools. He served in a postdoctoral training position at the National Institutes of Health where he investigated various aspects of nerve generation. From there he went to the University of California, San Francisco, as a faculty member for 8 years prior to his accepting his current position. Dr. Riley served on the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine (1997-2000) and was a member of the NSF Graduate Panel on Biomedical Sciences (1982). CAROL E.H. SCOTT-CONNER is a professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Iowa’s College of Medicine. For 9 years, she served as head of that department. She is widely known for her contributions to the fields of minimally invasive and oncologic surgery. Dr. Scott-Conner was a professor of surgery at the University of Mississippi’s School of Medicine prior to her appointment at the University of Iowa. She currently serves on the IOM’s Committee on Aerospace Medicine and Medicine of Extreme Environments and the Committee on Review of NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Dr. Scott-Conner formerly served on the Committee on Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (2003-2004) and the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit (1999-2001).

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Review of NASA Plans for the International Space Station PETER SUEDFELD is a professor and dean emeritus in the Department of Psychology at the University of British Columbia (UBC). Dr. Suedfeld taught at the University of Illinois and at University College, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey before moving to UBC. His research focuses on how human beings adapt to and cope with novelty, challenge, stress, and danger. The research has three major aspects: laboratory and clinical studies on restricted environmental stimulation, field research on psychological and psychophysiological concomitants of working in extreme and unusual environments such as space and polar stations, and the archival and experimental study of information processing and decision making under uncertainty and stress. Dr. Suedfeld is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He served on the NRC Panel on Human Behavior (1997-1998) and is chair of the Life Sciences Advisory Committee of the Canadian Space Agency. KENNETH T. WHEELER, JR., is professor emeritus of radiologic sciences at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine and president of Wheeler Scientific Consultants, Inc. Dr. Wheeler received his B.A. from Harvard College in 1962, an MAT in education (biological sciences) from Wesleyan University in 1963, and a Ph.D. in radiation biophysics from Kansas University in 1970. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Colorado State University (1970-1972), and prior to joining the faculty at Wake Forest, Dr. Wheeler previously served on the faculties of the University of California, San Francisco (1972-1976), University of Rochester School of Medicine (1976-1981), Brown University (1981-1983), and Kansas University (1983-1986). He served as a reviewer for the 2001 NRC report The Impact of Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Policy on Biomedical Research in the United States. Staff SANDRA J. GRAHAM, study director, received her Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from Duke University in 1990. Her past research focused primarily on topics in bioinorganic chemistry, such as the exchange mechanisms and reaction chemistry of biological metal complexes and their analogs. From 1990 to 1994 she held the position of senior scientist at the Bionetics Corporation, where she worked in the science branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA headquarters. Since 1994 Dr. Graham has been a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council, where she has directed numerous studies, many of them focused in the areas of space life sciences and microgravity sciences. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the Space Studies Board. She joined SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and has also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences-Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland. CELESTE NAYLOR joined the Space Studies Board in June 2002 as a senior project assistant. She has worked with the Committee on Assessment of Options to Extend the Life of the Hubble Space Telescope and also with the Committee on Microgravity Research and the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station. Ms. Naylor is a member of the Society of Government Meeting Professionals and has more than 7 years of experience in event management.