Appendixes



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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation Appendixes

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members James Kenneth Mitchell (National Academy of Engineering and National Academy of Sciences), Chair, is University Distinguished Professor emeritus, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, and a consulting geotechnical engineer. He was previously on the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, from 1958 until his retirement as chair of the civil engineering department in 1993. His primary research activities focused on experimental and analytical studies of soil behavior related to geotechnical problems, including mitigation of ground failure risk during earthquakes. He has authored more than 350 publications, including guidance documents on soil stabilization, waste containment, ground improvement, and earth reinforcement, and a video, “Ground Improvement for Dam Safety,” produced in 1998 by the Interagency Committee on Dam Safety. As a consultant, Dr. Mitchell has worked with numerous governmental and private organizations on geotechnical problems and earthwork projects of many types, especially soil stabilization, ground improvement for seismic risk mitigation, earthwork construction, and environmental geotechnology, both nationally and internationally. He is licensed as a civil engineer and as a geotechnical engineer in California and as a professional engineer in Virginia. He is a fellow and honorary member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. He served as secretary (1966-1969), vice chairman (1970), and chairman (1971) of the Geotechnical Engineering Division of ASCE and as chairman of the U.S. National Committee for the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering. Dr. Mitchell was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in 1976

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation and the National Academy of Sciences in 1998. He is the 2003-2005 chair of the Civil Engineering Section of the National Academy of Engineering. He has participated on 17 NRC boards and study committees and served as chair or vice chair of five. He has received numerous honors, including the Norman Medal in 1972 and 1995, the Thomas A. Middlebrooks Award (four times), the Walter L. Huber Research Prize, the Terzaghi Lecture Award, the Karl Terzaghi Award, and the H. Bolton Seed Medal (2004), all from the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Chief of Engineers Outstanding Service Award in 1999. Dr. Mitchell received a B.S. in civil engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1951, an M.S. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1953, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering, also from MIT, in 1956. Patrick R. Atkins is director of environmental affairs at Alcoa, where he is responsible for environmental policy and global environmental programs. He serves on various lead teams, and he chairs global advisory committees that provide input to Alcoa’s corporate environment, health, and safety programs. Dr. Atkins joined Alcoa in Pittsburgh in 1972, after having served as a professor in environmental health engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He has published more than 50 technical articles and edited two books. Dr. Atkins is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Professional Engineers, and the Engineering Society of Western Pennsylvania. He represents Alcoa on the environmental committees of the International Primary Aluminum Institute, the Business Roundtable, the National Association of Manufacturers, and other national and international groups. In addition, he was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources. Dr. Atkins is a registered professional engineer and an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, teaching industrial waste treatment technology. Dr. Atkins earned a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Stanford University. Allan V. Burman is president of Jefferson Solutions, a division of the Jefferson Consulting Group, a firm that provides change management services and acquisition reform training to many federal departments and agencies. Dr. Burman provides strategic consulting services to private sector firms doing business with the federal government as well as to federal agencies and other government entities. He also has advised firms, congressional committees, and federal and state agencies on a variety of management and acquisition reform matters. Prior to joining the Jefferson

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation Consulting Group, Dr. Burman had a long career in the federal government, including serving as administrator for federal procurement policy in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), where he testified before Congress over 40 times on management, acquisition, and budget matters. Dr. Burman authored the 1991 policy letter that established performancebased contracting and greater reliance, where appropriate, on fixed-price contracting, as the favored approach for contract reform. As a member of the Senior Executive Service, Dr. Burman served as chief of the Air Force Branch in OMB’s National Security Division and was the first OMB branch chief to receive a Presidential Rank Award. Dr. Burman is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, a fellow and member of the board of advisors of the National Contract Management Association, a principal of the Council for Excellence in Government, a director of the Procurement Round Table, and an honorary member of the National Defense Industrial Association. From 1997 to 2003 he was a contributing editor and writer for Government Executive magazine. He has served as a member of the NRC Committee on Oversight and Assessment of Department of Energy Project Management since 2000. Dr. Burman obtained a B.A. from Wesleyan University, was a Fulbright scholar at the Institute of Political Studies, University of Bordeaux, France, and has a graduate degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from the George Washington University. Timothy J. Connolly is senior vice president and a national director of quality at HDR Engineering, Inc. He is a professional structural engineer responsible for structuring project teams and restructuring poorly performing departments in HDR. He has led HDR’s internal peer review program to review operational methods and procedures and develop an action plan to strengthen their effectiveness as well as identify the best practices that contribute to the success of the company. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Railway Engineering and Maintenance Association, and the Society of American Military Engineers. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Kansas. Lloyd A. Duscha (National Academy of Engineering) retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 1990 as the highest-ranking civilian after serving as deputy director, Engineering and Construction Directorate, at headquarters. He was principal investigator for the NRC report Assessing the Need for Independent Project Reviews in the Department of Energy and a member of the committee that produced the NRC report Improving Project Management in the Department of Energy. Mr. Duscha served in numerous progressive Army Corps of Engineers positions in various locations over

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation four decades. Mr. Duscha is currently an engineering consultant to various national and foreign government agencies, the World Bank, and private sector clients. He served on the Committee on the Outsourcing of the Management of Planning, Design, and Construction Related Services as well as the Committee on Shore Installation Readiness and Management. He chaired the NRC Committee on Research Needs for Transuranic and Mixed Waste at Department of Energy Sites and serves on the Committee on Opportunities for Accelerating the Characterization and Treatment of Nuclear Waste. He has also served on the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment and was vice chairman of the U.S. National Committee on Tunneling Technology. Other positions held were president, U.S. Committee on Large Dams; chair, Committee on Dam Safety, International Commission on Large Dams; executive committee, Construction Industry Institute; and board of directors, Research and Management Foundation of the American Consulting Engineers Council. Mr. Duscha has numerous professional affiliations, including fellowships in the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Society of American Military Engineers. He holds a B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota, which awarded him the Board of Regents’ Outstanding Achievement Award. G. Brian Estes completed 30 years in the Navy Civil Engineering Corps, achieving the rank of rear admiral. Admiral Estes served as commander of the Pacific Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and as commander of the Third Naval Construction Brigade at Pearl Harbor. He supervised over 700 engineers, 8,000 Seabees, and 4,000 other employees providing public works management, environmental support, family housing support, and facility planning, design, and construction services. As vice commander, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Admiral Estes led the total quality management transformation at headquarters and two updates of the corporate strategic plan. He directed execution of the $2 billion military construction program and the $3 billion facilities management program while serving as deputy commander for facilities acquisition and deputy commander for public works, Naval Facilities Engineering Command. After retiring from the Navy he became the director of construction projects at Westinghouse Hanford Company, where he directed project management functions supporting operations and environmental cleanup of the Department of Energy’s Hanford nuclear complex. He served on the committee that produced a series on progress in improving project management at the Department of Energy and has served on a number of other NRC committees. He holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Maine, an M.S. in civil engineering

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation from the University of Illinois, and is a registered professional engineer in Illinois and Virginia. Martha S. Feldman is professor of planning, policy, and design management, political science, and sociology, and Roger W. and Janice M. Johnson Chair in Civic Governance and Public Management at the University of California, Irvine. She has a long-standing interest in how organizations influence people’s ability to accomplish work. Her work in public management builds on this interest and focuses on the tools managers can use to create public organizations that are broadly inclusive of employees and the public. Prior to joining the University of California, she was professor of political science and public policy and associate dean of the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan. She has authored or coauthored four books, including Strategies for Interpreting Qualitative Data (1995), and scores of journal articles, book chapters, and reviews and commentaries. She has presented more than 40 papers, including one entitled “Organizational change process: Moving from plans to action” and “Organizational process and democratic capacity” at the Seventh National Public Management Research Conference (2003). Dr. Feldman is a member of the Academy of Management, the American Political Science Association, the American Society for Public Administration, and the Public Management Research Association. She holds a B.A. in political science from the University of Washington and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. Darrell G. Fontane is director of the International School for Water Resources and a professor in civil engineering at Colorado State University. His research interests include water resources decision support systems, computer-aided water management, and integrated water quantity and quality management. He is responsible for organizing international nondegree programs for engineers in various aspects of water resources engineering. Dr. Fontane served as a visiting associate professor at the Center for Water Resources and Quality Management, Korea, 1991, and as a visiting research engineer at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station. He has served as principal or coprincipal investigator for research projects on topics such as methodologies to improve regional exchange of hydropower resources, stochastic analysis of project dependable capacity in hydropower systems, optimal design and operation of selective withdrawal structures, optimal selection of salinity control measures in the Colorado River Basin, developing alternative operation strategies for the Colorado River Basin, evaluation of the Lake Nasser optimization models, development of methods to assess alterna-

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation tive water-based recreational strategies, development of a general reservoir decision support system, and optimal operation of a system of lakes for quantity and quality. These projects have been funded by the World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the U.S. National Park Service, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Department of Energy–Western Area Power Administration, and the Korea Center for Water Resources and Quality Management. Dr. Fontane has served as a member of several NRC committees on issues related to water resources management, instream flows, and salmon survival in the Columbia River. He is a member of water resources professional societies such as the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the American Water Resources Association, and the International Water Resources Association. Dr. Fontane has over 95 publications, including several articles and presented papers on the analysis, planning, and management of water service systems for the ASCE. Dr. Fontane holds a B.S. in civil engineering from Louisiana State University, an M.S. from Georgia Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in civil engineering and water resources planning and management from Colorado State University. Sammie D. Guy is a consulting engineer specializing in the prevention and resolution of disputes in the construction of water resource facilities. He retired from the Bureau of Reclamation after more than 30 years’ service as an engineer and administrator. His positions included head of the construction contract branch, director for engineering research, and chief of international affairs, where he was responsible for providing technical assistance and training in water resources development and management to developing countries. He is a recipient of the Department of the Interior’s Honor Award for Superior Service. Mr. Guy has also worked with the World Bank to provide technical assistance for construction management, quality assurance, and institutional organization in Indonesia and India. He is coauthor of a book on construction claims, now in its third edition, a member of the board of directors of the Dispute Resolution Board Foundation, the American Society of Civil Engineers (life member), the U.S. Committee on Irrigation and Drainage, the U.S. Committee on Large Dams, and the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage. Mr. Guy holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky. L. Michael Kaas recently retired as director of the Department of the Interior’s Office of Managing Risk and Public Safety. In that position he was responsible for facilities management and health and safety. His 28-year career at the department also included positions at the U.S. Bureau of

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation Mines as associate director for information and analysis, chief of the Division of Resource Evaluation, chief of the Division of Environmental Technology Research, chief of the Office of Regulatory Projects Coordination, chief of the Division of Mineral Information Systems, deputy director of minerals information and analysis, and planning officer. He is a recipient of the Department of the Interior’s Distinguished Service Award and its Meritorious Service Award. Mr. Kaas is a member and past director of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME) of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) and a recipient of the Herbert Hoover Award. He has authored many technical papers. Mr. Kaas is a registered professional engineer in Minnesota and holds a B.S. in mining engineering from the Pennsylvania State University and an M.S. in mineral engineering from the University of Minnesota. Charles I. McGinnis retired from the U.S. Army as a major general and was formerly the director of civil works for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. More recently he served in senior positions at the Construction Industry Institute in Austin, Texas. He has also served as a senior officer of Fru-Con Corporation and as the director of engineering and construction for the Panama Canal Company and later as vice president of the company and lieutenant governor of the Canal Zone. As director of civil works, he was responsible for a $3 billion per year planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance program of water-resources-oriented public works on a nationwide basis. He is a fellow of the Society of American Military Engineers, a fellow and life member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, and a charter member of the National Academy of Construction. He is a recipient of the U.S. Army’s Distinguished Service Medal. General McGinnis holds a master’s degree in civil engineering from Texas A&M University. Roger K. Patterson is a water resources consultant. He recently retired as the director of the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources. Prior to his appointment with the state of Nebraska, he spent 25 years with the Bureau of Reclamation working in several western states. He helped implement the Central Valley Project Improvement Act of 1992, landmark reform legislation involving more than 100 separate mandates that address project operations such as water conservation, contract renewals, and water transfers. A founding member of the Federal Ecosystem Directorate, Mr. Patterson was responsible for coordination among four federal agencies on issues related to protecting the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta. In 1995 he received the Presidential Rank Distinguished Executive Award for his leadership role in the devel-

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Managing Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation opment and supervision of water resources management programs in California and a Department of the Interior award for Distinguished Service. Mr. Patterson was chairman of the Nebraska Boundary Compact Commission and the state’s representative to the Missouri River Basin Association, State Environmental Trust Board, Blue River Compact, Republican River Compact, and Upper Niobrara River Compact. He holds B.S. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Nebraska.