Appendixes



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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities Appendixes

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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities A Biographic Information on Members and Staff of Committee on Advanced Research Instrumentation MARTHA A. KREBS (Chair) is the director of the energy R&D division at the California Energy Commission and the past president of Science Strategies, a consulting firm that works with academic and private organizations to identify and address critical issues and opportunities in science and technology that will affect their research and development and business activities. She was an associate vice chancellor for research and founding institute director of the California Nanosystems Institute, where she was responsible for establishing initial leadership, strategic direction, and administration. Dr. Krebs served as director and assistant secretary of the Office for Science for the Department of Energy from 1993 to 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree and PhD in physics from the Catholic University of America. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a fellow of the American Physical Society, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the Association of Women in Science. DAVID JOHN BISHOP is president of the New Jersey Nanotechnology Consortium and vice president of nanotechnology research at Lucent Technologies–Bell Laboratories. In 1973, he received a BS in physics from Syracuse University. In 1977 and 1978, he received an MS and a PhD, respectively, in physics from Cornell University. In 1978, he became a postdoctoral member of the staff at AT&T-Bell Laboratories; in 1979 he was made a member of the technical staff. In 1988, he was made a distinguished member of the technical staff and later that year was promoted to department head, Bell Laboratories. Dr. Bishop is a Bell Laboratories

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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities fellow. He has held a number of managerial positions at Bell Laboratories, including director of the Liquid Crystal Physics Research Department, director of the Microstructure Research Department, director of the MEMS Research Department, optical research vice president, and physical sciences research vice president. He has written and given over 500 papers and talks. He also has applied for or been issued more than 50 patents. MARVIN CASSMAN is an independent consultant. He was the executive director of the Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research (QB3) at the University of California. Previously, he served as director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Cassman received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Chicago and a doctoral degree in biochemistry from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University of New York. He was a California resident for 10 years, first as an NIH postdoctoral fellow at the University of California (UC), Berkeley, in the middle 1960s and then for 7 years on the UC, Santa Barbara, biology faculty before accepting his first post at NIH in 1975. Dr. Cassman has a particular interest in advancing biomedical research beyond its primary focus on individual molecules and genes. ULRICH DAHMEN is director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Founded in 1983, NCEM is a Department of Energy user facility that provides scientific researchers with essential resources for electronic-beam microcharacterization of materials. Dr. Dahmen came to the United States from Germany in 1974 and received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1979. He uses advanced techniques of electron microscopy to investigate size- and shape-dependent behavior of inclusions in alloys and interfaces in solids. His research interests encompass the crystallography of microstrutures; structural phase transformations in solids and interfaces; and orientation relationships and the role of symmetry, shape, and defects in solid state reactions. He has published extensively on the structure of interfaces, the evolution of precipitate morphologies, and the effects of size on the behavior of embedded particles. THOM H. DUNNING, JR., is the director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Dunning was the director of the Joint Institute for Computational Sciences in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and a distinguished scientist in computing and computational sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Before working in Tennessee, Dr. Dunning was responsible for supercomputing and networking for the University of North Carolina system and was a professor of chemistry at the University of

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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry in 1965 from the University of Missouri-Rolla and his doctorate in chemical physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1970. He has written nearly 150 scientific publications on topics ranging from advanced computational techniques for molecular calculations to computational studies of the spectroscopy of high-power lasers and the chemical reactions involved in combustion. He was the scientific leader of the Department of Energy’s first “Grand Challenge” in computational chemistry. MARILYN L. FOGEL is a staff member in the Geophysical Laboratory at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware College of Marine Studies. She uses sophisticated mass-spectrometry techniques and ion microprobes to study evolutionary biology and the history of the earth. She received a BS from Pennsylvania State University in 1973 and a PhD in botany (marine science) from the University of Texas at Austin in 1977. While holding her position at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, she has held various professorial and research appointments at the Smithsonian Institution, Dartmouth College, and George Washington University. She was elected a geochemistry fellow of the Geochemical Society and European Association of Geochemistry in 2003. LESLIE A. KOLODZIEJSKI is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) and leads MIT’s Research Laboratory of Electronics Integrated Photonic Materials and Devices Group. She received her PhD from Purdue University in 1986 and then joined the Purdue faculty as an assistant professor. In 1988, Dr. Kolodziejski joined MIT’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as an assistant professor. She has been a recipient of the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award and the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award. Dr. Kolodziejski held the Kar Van Tassel and Esther and Harold E. Edgerton professorships before her promotion to full professor in 1999. ALVIN L. KWIRAM is a professor of chemistry at the University of Washington; he has taught since 1964. He held the position of vice provost for research in 1990. He serves as executive director of a new National Science Foundation science and technology center in photonics and optoelectronics. His research, in physical chemistry, emphases the development of novel magnetic resonance techniques designed to probe the electronic structure of molecular systems in the solid state. Dr. Kwiram has received numerous honors and awards and is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of

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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities Science, a member of the Graduate Education Advisory Board of the American Chemical Society (ACS), and a member of the Executive Committee of the ACS Division of Physical Chemistry. He is a recipient of the Council for Chemical Research Award for the Promotion of University-Industry Relations, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowship, and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation fellowship. He is the US liaison for the Worldwide University Network, a consortium of international research universities. Dr. Kwiram received his BA in physics and BS in chemistry from Walla Walla College in 1958, and he received a PhD in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1962. WARREN S. WARREN is the Ralph W. Dornte Professor of Chemistry at Princeton University. He is also on the affiliated faculty in physics, electrical engineering, molecular biology, and neuroscience at the Frick Chemical Laboratory. He is the director of the New Jersey Center for Molecular and Biomolecular Imaging, an adjunct professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and on the affiliated faculty of the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania. From 1996 to 2001, he was director of the New Jersey Center for Ultrafast Laser Applications. From 1981 to 1982, he was a postdoctoral fellow under Ahmed Zewail at the California Institute of Technology. He received an AB in chemistry and physics from Harvard University in 1977 and a PhD in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1980. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society. As of July 2005, he is professor of chemistry and professor of radiology at Duke University. DANIEL F. WEILL is retired. From 2001 to 2002, he was director of the Ocean Drilling Program at the Joint Oceanographic Institutions. From 1985 to 2001 he directed the Instrumentation and Facilities Program in the National Science Foundation’s Division of Earth Sciences. From 1983 to 1985, he managed the Geosciences Program in the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy. He received a PhD in geochemistry from UC, Berkeley, in 1962. From 1963 to 1983, he taught and led research programs at UC, San Diego, and the University of Oregon. His research made fundamental contributions in the areas of mineral equilibria, analysis and interpretation of lunar samples, and the physical and thermodynamic properties of silicate liquids. He is a fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and the 2002 recipient of the Edward A. Flinn III Award from the American Geophysical Union.

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Advanced Research Instrumentation and Facilities PROFESSIONAL STAFF DEBORAH D. STINE (Study Director) is associate director of the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy; director of the National Academies Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Program; and director of the Office of Special Projects. Dr. Stine has been working on various projects throughout the National Academies since 1989. She has directed studies and other activities on science and security in an age of terrorism, human reproductive cloning, presidential and federal advisory committee science and technology appointments, facilitating interdisciplinary research, setting priorities for the National Science Foundation’s large research facilities, evaluating federal research programs, international benchmarking of US research, and many other issues. Before coming to the National Academies, she was a mathematician for the Air Force, an air-pollution engineer for the state of Texas, and an air-issues manager for the Chemical Manufacturers Association. She holds a BS in Mechanical and Environmental Engineering from the University of California, Irvine, an MBA from what is now Texas A&M at Corpus Christi, and a PhD in public administration with a focus on science and technology policy analysis from American University. She received the Mitchell Prize Young Scholar Award for her research on international environmental decision-making. RACHEL COURTLAND is a research associate for the National Academies Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She earned her BA in physics from the University of Pennsylvania in May 2003 and her MS in physics from Emory University in 2004. In graduate school, she studied the local perturbation of supercooled colloidal suspensions using two-dimensional confocal microscopy and conducted preparatory work for a National Aeronautics Space Administration PCS payload project. As an undergraduate, she led Women Interested in the Study of Physics, an organization created to help to foster a more comfortable environment for women scientists at undergraduate and graduate levels and dedicated to raising awareness of issues facing women in academe.