Appendix C
About the Authors

William J. Moss is an assistant professor in the departments of Epidemiology, International Health, and Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a pediatrician with subspecialty training in pediatric infectious diseases. He has lived and worked in Ethiopia, Kenya, Zambia, and South Africa. Much of his research has focused on virological and immunological interactions between measles virus and HIV, as well as the impact of the HIV epidemic on measles control. He has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization on measles and measles vaccination, as well as on child health in complex emergencies. He has M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Columbia University.

Lulu Muhe works in the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development of the World Health Organization. His work involves HIV prevention, care, and treatment and coordinating guidelines and training manuals in the areas of child and public health. Previously he worked in district management, coordination of medical education as associate dean of the medical faculty of Addis Ababa University, clinical work, and teaching and research on common public health problems. He has worked extensively in Africa, including Lome and Ethiopia, and was professor of pediatrics and child health at the University of Addis Ababa. His qualifications are in pediatrics and child health and epidemiology.



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Child Health in Complex Emergencies Appendix C About the Authors William J. Moss is an assistant professor in the departments of Epidemiology, International Health, and Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a pediatrician with subspecialty training in pediatric infectious diseases. He has lived and worked in Ethiopia, Kenya, Zambia, and South Africa. Much of his research has focused on virological and immunological interactions between measles virus and HIV, as well as the impact of the HIV epidemic on measles control. He has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization on measles and measles vaccination, as well as on child health in complex emergencies. He has M.D. and M.P.H. degrees from Columbia University. Lulu Muhe works in the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development of the World Health Organization. His work involves HIV prevention, care, and treatment and coordinating guidelines and training manuals in the areas of child and public health. Previously he worked in district management, coordination of medical education as associate dean of the medical faculty of Addis Ababa University, clinical work, and teaching and research on common public health problems. He has worked extensively in Africa, including Lome and Ethiopia, and was professor of pediatrics and child health at the University of Addis Ababa. His qualifications are in pediatrics and child health and epidemiology.

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Child Health in Complex Emergencies Meenakshi Ramakrishnan is a consultant at the World Health Organization, where she is involved in projects covering such subjects as measles vaccines and child health in complex humanitarian emergencies. She is also a consultant at Nemours Health and Prevention Services, where she conducted a pilot study of infant death reviews in Delaware using the National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review. Previously she worked at the Chester County Hospital. She currently serves as a member of the working group on child health in complex emergencies at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. She has worked on issues ranging from public and rural health to clinical pediatrics in India and Guatemala. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Public Health Association. She has an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University. Anne Henderson Siegle is an associate at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Tulane School of Public Health, where her focus has been on humanitarian interventions in complex emergencies and community-based primary health care. She has 18 years of integrated health programming field experience in more than 30 countries in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Eastern Europe. Her work has included the design, management, and evaluation of development, transition, and emergency humanitarian assistance programs within a multisectoral platform. She served for 10 years as a district, national, regional, and headquarters health manager and technical specialist in the humanitarian agency World Vision, where she continues to contribute to health programming and policy. Her interest is to contribute to the development of sustainable health systems and practices among underserved populations. She has an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dory Storms is senior associate in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and, until recently, director of monitoring and evaluation at Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in Deschapelles, Haiti. Previously she was director of the child support program at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, where her primary responsibilities included the development of a program to improve management and technical performance of U.S.-based private voluntary organizations. She has consulted for many organizations, includ-

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Child Health in Complex Emergencies ing the World Health Organization, UNICEF, the World Bank, and the U.S. Agency for International Development, and she has served on numerous committees and panels. Currently, she is a member of the advisory board for Advocacy for Survivors of Torture and Trauma and a member of the executive board for the American Public Health Association. She has an Sc.D. from Johns Hopkins University and an M.P.H. from Yale University. William M. Weiss is a public health, development, and training specialist with over 15 years of experience in working with and supporting health and development programs in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. As senior monitoring and evaluation adviser for Johns Hopkins University’s TSEHAI project, he provides technical assistance for monitoring and evaluating this project’s support for antiretroviral treatment of persons living with HIV/ AIDS across four regions of Ethiopia. At the Johns Hopkins University Center for Refugee and Disaster Response, he provides support in the design, collection, and analysis of qualitative and quantitative methods useful for assessing and solving health and development problems. As technical adviser to the CORE Group Polio Partners Project, he provides technical and management support to 20 polio projects in five countries. He has served as a consultant to nongovernmental organizations working in Latin America, South Asia, the former Soviet Union, and Africa. He has a Dr.P.H. in international health from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Child Health in Complex Emergencies The Committee on Population was established by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1983 to bring the knowledge and methods of the population sciences to bear on major issues of science and public policy. The committee’s work includes both basic studies of fertility, health and mortality, and migration and applied studies aimed at improving programs for the public health and welfare in the United States and in developing countries. The committee also fosters communication among researchers in different disciplines and countries and policy makers in government and international agencies. The Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration was established by the Committee on Population of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999. The Roundtable’s purpose is to serve as an interdisciplinary, nonpartisan focal point for taking stock of what is known about demographic patterns in refugee situations, applying this knowledge base to assist both policy makers and relief workers, and stimulating new directions for innovation and scientific inquiry in this growing field of study. The Roundtable meets yearly and has also organized a series of workshops (held concurrently with Roundtable meetings) on some of the specific aspects of the demography of refugee and refugee-like situations, including mortality patterns, demographic assessment techniques, and research ethics in complex humanitarian emergencies. The Roundtable is composed of experts from academia, government, philanthropy, and international organizations. Other Publications of the Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration Supporting Local Health Care in a Chronic Crisis: Management and Financing Approaches in the Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (2006) Fertility of Malian Tamasheq Repatriated Refugees: The Impact of Forced Migration (2004) War, Humanitarian Crises, Population Displacement, and Fertility: A Review of Evidence (2004) Psychosocial Concepts in Humanitarian Work with Children: A Review of the Concepts and Related Literature (2003) Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor (2003) Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters (2003) Research Ethics in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Demographic Assessment Techniques in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Forced Migration and Mortality (2001)

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