Appendixes



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Principal-Investigator-Led Missions in the Space Sciences Appendixes

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Principal-Investigator-Led Missions in the Space Sciences A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Committee JANET G. LUHMANN, Chair, is senior fellow at the Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, she held responsibility for Pioneer Venus Orbiter magnetometer data analysis at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Luhmann is presently principal investigator for the IMPACT investigation on NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) mission and codirector for heliospheric science in the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling, an NSF science and technology center. Her research focuses on comparing spacecraft observations with models of the solar wind and its interactions with planets. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and served as president of the space physics and aeronomy section. Her NRC service includes membership of the Space Studies Board and chair of the Board’s Committee on Solar and Space Physics and membership of the Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research and the Panel on Solar-Wind Magnetospheric Interactions. JAMES R. BARROWMAN is a consultant on program and project management. Previously, he was a project and program manager at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for 22 years. In that capacity he was involved in managing the Attached Shuttle Payloads project, the Attached Payloads and Explorers Mission project, the Explorers Program, the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite, the Hubble Space Telescope, among other satellite missions. In 2000, Mr. Barrowman became deputy director of the GSFC Space Science Directorate. He is the recipient of the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the NASA GSFC Award of Merit, and two NASA Exceptional Service Medals. Mr. Barrowman is a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and past president of the National Association of Rocketry. MARY CHIU was a program manager in the Space Department at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), where she worked for more than 27 years. In October 2002, Ms. Chiu retired from APL. During her career at APL, she was the project manager for the NASA Discovery Program’s CONTOUR mission and the

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Principal-Investigator-Led Missions in the Space Sciences program manager for the development of the ACE spacecraft at APL. Her work at APL also involved time and frequency devices and spaceflight instrumentation before she assumed greater responsibilities in full spacecraft program management in the early 1990s. Ms. Chiu has a B.S. in physics from the University of Toledo and an M.S. in applied physics from the Johns Hopkins University/Evening College. HUGH H. KIEFFER is a research geophysicist (retired) with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). His work has focused on terrestrial and planetary remote sensing. His expertise includes glaciology, image processing, thermal modeling, orbital geometry, spectroscopy of solids, and instrument design and development, among other areas. Dr. Kieffer has participated in the design, calibration, and operation of over 15 planetary and terrestrial orbiting, observatory, and airborne radiometers, spectrometers, and spectral imaging systems. He has received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, NASA Group Awards, and the USGS Meritorious Service Award. Dr. Kieffer served as a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration. JOHN W. LEIBACHER is the director of the NSF-sponsored Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) program and an astronomer at the National Solar Observatory. He is outgoing chair of the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and a member of the AAS Committee on Astronomy and Public Policy. Dr. Leibacher is involved in all aspects of helioseismology, but particularly techniques of time-series analysis and the physics of the atmospheric oscillations themselves. Dr. Leibacher devotes more than half of his efforts to assuring GONG’s technical and scientific success, as well as a guest investigation utilizing the SOI/MDI instrument onboard the SOHO spacecraft. Dr. Leibacher’s NRC service includes membership of the Committee on Solar and Space Physics (chair, 1987-1990), the Space Studies Board (1986-1990), the Solar and Space Physics Task Group (1984-1988), and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics (1985-1987). GARY J. MELNICK is senior astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. His research focuses on using infrared- and submillimeter-wavelength observations to investigate star formations. Within this realm he studies thermal balance within molecular clouds, interstellar chemistry, and shock waves associated with star formation and their effects on the material through which they pass. Dr. Melnick has conducted his research using data collected from ground-based telescopes, NASA’s Learjet, Kuiper Airborne Observatories, and NASA’s Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite program, for which he is principal investigator. Dr. Melnick is also deputy principal investigator for the Infrared Array Camera on the NASA Spitzer Space Observatory. H. WARREN MOOS is professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and is principal investigator for the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. Dr. Moos’s research involves the use of spaceborne telescopes to investigate important astrophysical objects. He has been involved in several space missions as a coinvestigator, including the ultraviolet spectrometers on the Apollo 17, the Voyager missions, and the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope flown on the space shuttle in 1990 and 1995. He was also a coinvestigator for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph installed in the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997. Dr. Moos was a member of the NRC Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration, the Panel for Review of the Explorer Program, and the Panel on Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared Astronomy from Space. KATHRYN SCHMOLL is vice president for finance and administration at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), where she has responsibility for all financial, contractual, human re-

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Principal-Investigator-Led Missions in the Space Sciences sources, and administrative functions of the corporation. In this capacity, she serves as the chief financial officer of UCAR. Previously, Ms. Schmoll was the comptroller for the Environmental Protection Agency and liaison to the Congressional Appropriations Committees, the Office of Management and Budget, and the General Accounting Office. She also served as the assistant associate administrator in the NASA Office of Space Science and Applications, where she oversaw budget management, program management for facilities construction, GSFC and JPL, and resource analysis. Ms. Schmoll holds a B.S. in public administration from Indiana University and is a graduate of the Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program. She is the recipient of the William Jump award for outstanding public service, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, and an Outstanding Achievement Award from Women in Aerospace. ALAN M. TITLE is the principal scientist at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Advanced Technology Center, where his research focuses on solar magnetic and velocity fields; on optical interferometers and on high-resolution observations using active and adaptive optical systems; and on data analysis systems for image analysis. Dr. Title is the principal investigator on the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer mission (TRACE), is the U.S. principal investigator for the focal plane package on the Japanese Solar-B mission, and PI for the atmospheric imaging assembly for the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In 2001, Dr. Title was awarded the Hale Prize from the American Astronomical Society, the first person from private industry to receive that award. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Title has served on several NRC committees, including the Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee (1998-2002) and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics: A Community Assessment and Strategy for the Future (2001-2003), and was a member of the Space Studies Board (1998-2001). Staff PAMELA L. WHITNEY, study director, is a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board, where she has directed studies and workshops on international cooperation in space, Earth remote sensing, Mars planetary protection, space policy, among other space technology and research topics. Ms. Whitney also serves as the executive secretary of the U.S. national committee to the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) of the International Council for Science (ICSU). Previously, she held positions as an analyst at the aerospace consulting firm CSP Associates, Inc., and as a researcher and writer for Time-Life Books, Inc. Ms. Whitney was president of Freelance Unlimited and held contracts with the National Geographic Society, the World Bank, and the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment. Ms. Whitney holds an A.B. in economics from Smith College and an M.A. in international communication from the American University. She is a member of Women in Aerospace and the International Academy of Astronautics. EMILIE W. CLEMMENS was an NRC Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the Space Studies Board during the Fall of 2004. She earned a Ph.D. in bioengineering in December 2003 from the University of Washington and a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Kentucky. Her dissertation research was aimed at understanding molecular level differences between cardiac and skeletal muscles, and she engineered a system to measure in vitro muscle protein mechanics. Dr. Clemmens is also the cofounder of the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy, which is a new organization dedicated to promoting dialogue in the Seattle area between scientists, policy experts, legislators, and the general public on timely issues concerning the ethics and policy of scientific research.

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Principal-Investigator-Led Missions in the Space Sciences AMANDA SHARP, an undergraduate intern research assistant in the summer of 2004, pursued a bachelor’s degree in physics at Harvard University, but her courses included significant work in astronomy and math. Her undergraduate research work included modeling the atmospheric profiles of extrasolar giant planets and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. CARMELA J. CHAMBERLAIN has worked for the National Academies since 1974. She started as a senior project assistant in the Institute for Laboratory Animals for Research, which is now a board in the Division on Earth and Life Sciences, where she worked for 2 years, then transferred to the Space Science Board, which is now the Space Studies Board. CATHERINE A. GRUBER is an assistant editor with the Space Studies Board. She joined SSB as a senior program assistant in 1995. Ms. Gruber first came to the NRC in 1988 as a senior secretary for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and has also worked as an outreach assistant for the National Academy of Sciences–Smithsonian Institution’s National Science Resources Center. She was a research assistant (chemist) in the National Institute of Mental Health’s Laboratory of Cell Biology for 2 years. She has a B.A. in natural science from St. Mary’s College of Maryland.