APPENDIX A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Neal Lane, Chair, is a nationally recognized leader in science and technology policy development and application. He is now a university professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and fellow of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, where he previously served as university provost. He also served as assistant to the president for science and technology, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, director of the National Science Foundation, and chancellor of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Dr. Lane earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Oklahoma and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Women in Science.


Thomas B. Deen, Vice-chair, is a transportation consultant and former executive director of the Transportation Research Board, a position he held from 1980 to 1994. He is former chairman and president of PRC-Voorhees, a transportation engineering and planning consulting firm. During this period, he was in charge of his firm’s activities in major urban highway and rail transit projects, both in this country and abroad. Later he was chairman of the national interagency committee that prepared the strategic plan for America’s development of intelligent transportation systems. In recent years, the governor of Maryland has appointed him as chair of several blue ribbon committees investigating significant rail and road projects in the state. He also serves on an advisory board for the federal Department of Transportation’s Bureau of



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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Neal Lane, Chair, is a nationally recognized leader in science and technology policy development and application. He is now a university professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and fellow of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, where he previously served as university provost. He also served as assistant to the president for science and technology, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, director of the National Science Foundation, and chancellor of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Dr. Lane earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Oklahoma and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Women in Science. Thomas B. Deen, Vice-chair, is a transportation consultant and former executive director of the Transportation Research Board, a position he held from 1980 to 1994. He is former chairman and president of PRC-Voorhees, a transportation engineering and planning consulting firm. During this period, he was in charge of his firm’s activities in major urban highway and rail transit projects, both in this country and abroad. Later he was chairman of the national interagency committee that prepared the strategic plan for America’s development of intelligent transportation systems. In recent years, the governor of Maryland has appointed him as chair of several blue ribbon committees investigating significant rail and road projects in the state. He also serves on an advisory board for the federal Department of Transportation’s Bureau of

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States Transportation Statistics. His research interests include intermodal planning of urban transportation systems, integration of transportation and land use in urban areas, national transportation policy, and intelligent transportation systems. He holds a B.S. degree from the University of Kentucky and a certificate from Yale University’s Bureau of Highway Traffic; he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Julian Agyeman is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University. He also served on the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Environmental Justice Advisory Committee (MEJAC). He earned a B.Sc. degree in geography and botany from the University of Durham, UK; a postgraduate certificate in geography and environmental studies from the University of Newcastle-on-Tyne, Enfield, UK; an M.A. degree in conservation policy from the Middle-sex University, Enfield, UK; and a Ph.D. degree in environmental education from the University of London. He is the editor of Local Environment, an international peer-reviewed journal and the author and editor of many books and articles. He is a practitioner and researcher in sustainable development and environmental justice at local, national, and international levels. His practical experience was gained through work in the United Kingdom as a consultant on environmental and sustainable development; environmental education adviser and head of curriculum support for the Education Department in the London Borough of Islington; senior environmental education officer for the Directorate of Environmental Health in the London Borough of Lambeth; and chair and founder of the Black Environment Network. Lisa M. Bendixen is an expert in hazmat risk and safety and has worked on risk assessment and management problems in numerous industries covering both fixed facilities and transportation systems. She was the project manager and primary author of the Guidelines for Chemical Transportation Risk Analysis, published by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers’ Center for Chemical Process Safety, and has served on the center’s technical steering committee. She is currently a vice president with ICF Consulting, where she provides consulting services to private companies, trade associations, and government organizations on a variety of hazardous materials and transportation safety and security issues. She previously spent 22 years in Arthur D. Little, Inc.’s, environment and risk practice. Ms. Bendixen holds a B.S. degree in applied mathematics and an M.S. degree in operations research, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dennis C. Bley has more than 30 years of experience in applying quantitative risk analysis to engineered facilities. His current research involves

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States the application of risk analysis to diverse technological systems, uncertainty modeling, technical risk communication, and human reliability analysis. He is president of Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., and a principal of the WreathWood Group, a joint venture company that supports multidisciplinary research in human performance. He also serves on the board of directors of the International Association for Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management. His clients include the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Nuclear Energy (for development of risk assessment methods for Generation IV reactors); the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (also for the development of risk assessment methods); and the Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center (for work on human reliability analysis for railroad accidents). Dr. Bley has a Ph.D. degree in nuclear reactor engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a registered professional engineer in the State of California. Hank Jenkins-Smith is a nationally recognized expert on public perception of environmental and technical risks. His research involves measurement of public and elite risk perceptions of transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials, nuclear waste, and national security issues. He is currently doing research on public perceptions of nuclear security, terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction that is funded through Sandia National Laboratories and the National Science Foundation. His previous research includes public reactions to hazardous facilities, public perceptions of the risks of shipping foreign research reactor spent fuel, and the effects of spent fuel shipments on property values. He is a professor of public policy and holds the Joe R. and Teresa Lozano Long Chair of Business and Government at the George H.W. Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. Previously, he was professor of political science and director of the Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Jenkins-Smith received a B.S. degree in political science and economics from Linfield College and an M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in political science, both from the University of Rochester. Dr. Jenkins-Smith has published several recent peer-reviewed papers of relevance to this committee’s work, including “Mitigation and Benefits Measures as Policy Tools for Siting Potentially Hazardous Facilities: Determinants of Effectiveness and Appropriateness” (with Howard Kunreuther. 2001. Risk Analysis, 21:71–382), and “Nuclear Waste Transport and Residential Property Values: Estimating the Effects of Perceived Risks” (with Kishore Gawande. 2001. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 42:207–233). Melvin F. Kanninen is internationally recognized for his expertise in fracture mechanics and its applications to structural integrity and durability.

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States During his 40-year R&D career he has developed and applied this expertise to a wide range of engineering applications, including aging aircraft, rotorcraft, and spacecraft; nuclear power plant pressure vessel and piping systems; and natural gas transmission and distribution pipelines. Dr. Kanninen is currently the principal of MFK Consulting Services. Previously, he held positions with General Electric at the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, Battelle’s Columbus Laboratories, and most recently, the Southwest Research Institute where he served as vice president and director of the structural engineering division. He has published more than 180 technical papers, given more than 100 seminar lectures, and coedited six technical books. He is the coauthor of the well-regarded textbook Advanced Fracture Mechanics, published by Oxford Press. Dr. Kanninen, who received his Ph.D. degree in engineering mechanics from Stanford University, is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Ernest J. Moniz is widely recognized for his work in theoretical nuclear physics and, more recently, science and technology policy formulation. He joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty in 1973 and is currently the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and co-director of the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment. He previously served as head of the MIT Physics Department; as undersecretary of the U.S. Department of Energy; and as associate director for science in the Office of Science and Technology Policy. His current research-related activities include a foundation-sponsored project on the future of coal, work for Los Alamos National Laboratory on security issues related to weapons of mass destruction, and service on a technical advisory board for EPRI. Dr. Moniz received a B.S. degree in physics from Boston College and a Ph.D. degree in theoretical physics from Stanford University. He received honorary doctorate degrees from the University of Athens, the University of Erlangen-Nurenburg, and Michigan State University. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Humboldt Foundation, and the American Physical Society. John W. Poston, Sr., is a nationally recognized expert in health physics, occupational dosimetry, and health effects of radiation releases from accidents and terrorist events. He is professor and past chair of the Department of Nuclear Engineering and a consultant at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Texas A&M University, where he teaches health physics and conducts research on dosimetry. His dosimetry research is supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, and he consults with Sandia National Laboratories and a Texas nuclear utility on operational safety issues. He chaired the National Council on

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States Radiation Protection and Measurements committee that produced the 2001 report Management of Terrorist Events Involving Radioactive Material, and he served as a peer reviewer for the American Association of Railroads on a risk assessment for rail transport of spent nuclear fuel. Dr. Poston is president emeritus of the Health Physics Society and received the 2003 Loevinger-Berman Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Lacy E. Suiter has more than three decades of experience in emergency planning and response at both state and federal levels. He spent 30 years as a career employee of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency, the last 12 years as that agency’s director. He also served as executive associate director for Response and Recovery for the Federal Emergency Management Agency until his retirement in 2002. In that capacity he was responsible for planning and executing the federal government’s response to major disasters and emergencies and managing that agency’s multibillion-dollar individual and public assistance grant programs. Mr. Suiter earned his B.S. degree in business from Middle Tennessee State University and is the recent recipient of the United States Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award and the United States Army Corps of Engineers D. De Fleury Medal. Joseph M. Sussman is an internationally recognized transportation operations expert whose research has covered a wide range of transportation issues, including transportation systems and institutions; regional strategic transportation planning; intercity freight and passenger rail; intelligent transportation systems; simulation and risk assessment methods; and complex systems analysis. He is currently the Japan Rail East Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems Division at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and receives some of his research support through the Department of Transportation’s Volpe Center and from the Association of American Railroads. He previously served as director of MIT’s Center for Transportation Studies and head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Sussman received a B.C.E. degree from City College of New York; an M.S.C.E. degree from the University of New Hampshire; and a Ph.D. degree in civil engineering systems from MIT. Elizabeth Q. Ten Eyck is an expert in domestic and international nuclear safeguards and security for government-owned and licensed commercial nuclear facilities. She has more than 30 years of career federal service—first as a security engineer for the U.S. Secret Service; then as director of the Office of Safeguards and Security for the U.S. Department of Energy; and, until she retired in 2000, as director of the Division of Fuel Cycle Safety and Safeguards of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), where

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States she managed the safety and safeguards regulatory program for commercial fuel cycle facilities. During her career at USNRC she also managed transportation activities and the safeguards program for nuclear power reactors. She is currently president of ETE Consulting, Inc., and is involved in consulting work for the Department of Homeland Security on vulnerability assessments through Argonne National Labs. Ms. Ten Eyck received her B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland. Seth Tuler is an expert in public participation, environmental decision making, and community responses to risk communication. His research, which is funded by the National Science Foundation and private foundations, involves public and worker health risks associated with U.S. nuclear weapons production. He also participates in education and training of community members in public participation mechanisms and public health study methods in association with the Alliance for Nuclear Accountability and its member groups. He is a research fellow in the Center for Technology, Environment, and Development at the George Perkins March Institute at Clark University (Worcester, Massachusetts) and a researcher for the Social and Environmental Research Institute (Leverett, Massachusetts). He received a B.A. degree in mathematics from the University of Chicago; an M.S. degree in technology and policy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and a Ph.D. degree in environmental science and policy from Clark University. Detlof von Winterfeldt is an internationally recognized expert in applying decision and risk analysis to technology and environmental management problems—both as a researcher and as a practitioner. He is a professor of public policy and management in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development at the University of Southern California (USC). He also is director of USC’s Homeland Security Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events. He currently receives support from the Department of Homeland Security for work on risk and economic analysis of terrorism and from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a project on living with risk. He is the author and coauthor of several publications related to nuclear safety and nuclear waste issues, including a chapter on DOE’s selection of candidate nuclear waste repository sites (Keeney, R.L., and von Winterfeldt, D. 1988. The analysis and its role for selecting nuclear repository sites. In G.K. Rand (Ed.) Operational Research ’87. Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Publishers, pp. 686–701) and an article comparing strategies of disposing of spent fuel from power plants (Keeney, R.L., and von Winterfeldt, D. 1994. Managing nuclear waste from power plants. Risk Analysis, 14:107-130). He received M.A. and B.A. degrees in psychology from the University of Hamburg, Germany, and a Ph.D. degree in math-

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Going the Distance? The Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in the United States ematical psychology from the University of Michigan. He is the 2000 recipient of the Ramsey Medal for distinguished contributions to decision analysis by the Decision Analysis Society. Thomas R. Warne is known nationally for his expertise in transportation administration, public policy, and large project and program delivery. He is the founder and president of Tom Warne and Associates, LLC, a management consulting company. His previous positions include executive director of the Utah Department of Transportation and deputy director and chief operating officer of the Arizona Department of Transportation. Mr. Warne holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Brigham Young University and a master’s degree in civil engineering from Arizona State University; he is a registered professional engineer in Arizona and Utah. Clive Young is an internationally recognized expert in safety standards for transport of radioactive materials. He has worked at the Department for Transport of the United Kingdom since 1978 and, since 1996, has been head of the Radioactive Materials Transport Division and transport radiological adviser to the Secretary of State for Transport. In this position he is responsible for carrying out the executive functions of the “competent authority” for the transport of radioactive material in the United Kingdom on behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport. He serves as chairman of the Transport Safety Standards Committee of the International Atomic Energy Agency and chairman of the Radioactive Material Working Group of the International Maritime Organization. He previously held the position of research engineer at the UK Atomic Energy Authority. Mr. Young earned his B.Sc. in mechanical engineering from the University of Leeds. He is a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and is a chartered engineer.