About the Authors

Ransom L. Baldwin, PhD (Chair), is professor and session chair of the Department of Animal Science of the University of California, Davis. He is known for his research on nutrient use and energetics in ruminant animals. Dr. Baldwin has extensive National Research Council committee experience, including involvement on the Committee to Revise the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (1996) and his role as chair of the Subcommittee on Input-Output Relationships in Animal Production. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences.


Chandra R. Bhat, PhD, is an associate professor of civil engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the associate chairman of the Civil Engineering Department and the Fluor Centennial Teaching Fellow in Engineering. He has expertise in transportation-system analysis and travel-demand modeling. Dr. Bhat has done work for a number of metropolitan planning organizations on improvements in their travel-modeling procedures, including Boston, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston-Galveston, and Seattle. He is chair of the National Research Council Committee on Passenger Travel Demand Forecasting and is a member of the National Research Council Committee for Review of Travel Demand Modeling by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments.


Donald H. Bouyer, PhD, is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. His current research interests include host-parasite mechanisms of rickettsial diseases. He has



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About the Authors Ransom L. Baldwin, PhD (Chair), is professor and session chair of the Department of Animal Science of the University of California, Davis. He is known for his research on nutrient use and energetics in ruminant animals. Dr. Baldwin has extensive National Research Council committee experience, including involvement on the Committee to Revise the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (1996) and his role as chair of the Subcommittee on Input-Output Relationships in Animal Production. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Chandra R. Bhat, PhD, is an associate professor of civil engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the associate chairman of the Civil Engineering Department and the Fluor Centennial Teaching Fellow in Engineering. He has expertise in transportation-system analysis and travel-demand modeling. Dr. Bhat has done work for a number of metro- politan planning organizations on improvements in their travel-modeling procedures, including Boston, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston-Galveston, and Seattle. He is chair of the National Research Council Committee on Passenger Travel Demand Forecasting and is a member of the National Research Council Committee for Review of Travel Demand Modeling by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. Donald H. Bouyer, PhD, is an assistant professor of pathology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. His current research interests include host-parasite mechanisms of rickettsial diseases. He has 127

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128 ABOUT THE AUTHORS expertise in zoonotic diseases. Dr. Bouyer is a project leader at the Western Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases Research. The regional centers were created and funded by the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Disease to develop and con- duct programs to promote scientific discovery and translational research capacity to create the next generation of therapeutics for select agents and to provide facilities and support to first-line responders in the event of a national biodefense emergency. Firdaus S. Dhabhar, PhD, is an associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has expertise in stress and its effects on the endocrine and immune systems. Using rodent and human models, Dr. Dhabhar has elucidated critical psychophysiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms by which stress may exert enhancing and suppressive effects on immune function in vivo. A major part of his effort is focused on examining the novel and unex- pected immunoenhancing effects of mild stressors on innate, adaptive, and antitumor immune responses in the skin. For this work, Dr. Dhabhar received the PsychoNeuroImmunology Research Society Young Investi- gator Award in 2000, the Stazen Research Excellence Award in 2002, and the Fields Award for Excellence in Research and Teaching in 2003. Dr. Dhabhar served as a member of the Institute of Medicine committees on Gulf War and Health (Phase 1): Health Effects Associated with Expo- sure during the Persian Gulf War and Assessing Interactions among Social, Behavioral, and Genetic Factors in Health. He has also served as a grant reviewer for the National Institutes of Health and as a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association. Steven L. Leary, DVM, is the assistant vice chancellor for veterinary affairs, director of the Division of Comparative Medicine, and research associate professor in the Department of Pathology at Washington Uni- versity School of Medicine. He has a long history with laboratory animal transportation issues. Dr. Leary has previously served on an American Veterinary Medical Association committee to address concerns about the air transportation of companion animals. He has served as a member of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International. He is also a member of other research animal welfare organizations, including the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science and the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Dr. Leary has served on the Editorial Board of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Science and on the Scientific Review Board of Laboratory Animals.

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129 ABOUT THE AUTHORS John J. McGlone, PhD, is a professor of animal science and cell biology and biochemistry in a joint appointment with Texas Tech University and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. He is also director of the Pork Industry Institute for Research and Education at Texas Tech. He has done extensive research on the behavior, welfare, and stress physiology of pigs and other research animals, including rodents and macaques. Dr. McGlone served in several capacities on the Council on Accreditation of the Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Ani- mal Care International. He is also a member of several societies, including the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, the American Society of Animal Science, the Animal Behavior Society, and the Inter- national Society for Applied Ethology. He has served as the section editor for the Environment and Behavior Section of the Journal of Animal Science, the Federation of Animal Science Societies animal care committee, and the Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine advi- sory committee. Eric Raemdonck is the manager of live animals and perishable goods in the International Air Transport Association (IATA). He is in charge of the IATA Live Animals Regulations manual, which contains guidelines for shipping live animals by air. With over 15 years of multimodal cargo transportation experience, he has vast knowledge of and experience with regulatory issues pertaining to the transportation of live animals (particu- larly primates). Jennie L. Smith is the coordinator of the Yale Animal Resources Center, a centralized animal facility at Yale University. Ms. Smith oversees animal procurement and receiving for the university. She is also in charge of domestic and international importation and exportation of animals for the university. In addition to her knowledge and understanding of regu- latory procedures and policies, Ms. Smith has experience in the ground transportation of rodents and other research animals. Janice C. Swanson, PhD, is a professor of animal sciences and industry at Kansas State University. She is involved in research and activities address- ing animal welfare concerns associated with farm animals exposed to intensive conditions, including confinement and transportation. Before her appointment at Kansas State University, Dr. Swanson worked for the Animal Welfare Information Center at the US Department of Agriculture. She is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Animal Behavior Society, the American Society of Animal Science, and the Inter- national Society for Applied Ethology.

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