APPENDIX A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Jane C. S. Long, Chair, is the associate director of energy and the environment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She served as dean at Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno, from 1979 until 2003, and while there initiated the Mining Life-Cycle Center and the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Research. Previously, Dr. Long was on the staff of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for 20 years. She is an expert in rock mechanics and fracture hydrology and has worked on several U.S. and international underground repository research projects. Her research investigates fluid flow in fractures, with applications in nuclear waste storage, geothermal reservoirs, petroleum reservoirs, and contaminant transport. She was the chair for the National Research Council study “Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications” and is a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Long received a Sc.B. in engineering from Brown University and an M.S. in geotechnical engineering and a Ph.D. in materials science and mineral engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the American Geological Institute Foundation Board and an associate of the National Academy of Sciences.

Bernard Amadei is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. At the University of Colorado, he is leading a new paradigm shift in engineering education and practice called Earth Systems Engineering, which emphasizes the interaction between engineering structures and natural systems. Dr. Amadei was a member of the U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics (National Research



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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Jane C. S. Long, Chair, is the associate director of energy and the environment at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She served as dean at Mackay School of Mines, University of Nevada, Reno, from 1979 until 2003, and while there initiated the Mining Life-Cycle Center and the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Research. Previously, Dr. Long was on the staff of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for 20 years. She is an expert in rock mechanics and fracture hydrology and has worked on several U.S. and international underground repository research projects. Her research investigates fluid flow in fractures, with applications in nuclear waste storage, geothermal reservoirs, petroleum reservoirs, and contaminant transport. She was the chair for the National Research Council study “Rock Fractures and Fluid Flow: Contemporary Understanding and Applications” and is a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. Dr. Long received a Sc.B. in engineering from Brown University and an M.S. in geotechnical engineering and a Ph.D. in materials science and mineral engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a member of the American Geological Institute Foundation Board and an associate of the National Academy of Sciences. Bernard Amadei is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder. At the University of Colorado, he is leading a new paradigm shift in engineering education and practice called Earth Systems Engineering, which emphasizes the interaction between engineering structures and natural systems. Dr. Amadei was a member of the U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics (National Research

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation Council) and chair of the American Society of Civil Engineering Rock Mechanics Committee. He was one of the cofounders of the American Rock Mechanics Association. He also is the founding president of Engineers Without Borders USA, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping developing communities with their engineering needs for water, sanitation, and energy systems. He has coauthored two books and approximately 150 technical papers, and has also provided consulting services to various engineering companies and organizations around the world. Dr. Amadei holds an M.S. in civil engineering from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Jean-Pierre Bardet is a professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He has worked for the university for the past two decades, and his research areas include computational geomechanics, granular mechanics, geotechnical engineering, geotechnical earthquake engineering, post-earthquake field reconnaissance, and geoinformation systems. Dr. Bardet is the author of over 100 technical publications and is on the editorial board of several technical journals. He holds a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. In 2002 he was awarded the Gilbreth lecture from the National Academy of Engineering. John T. Christian is currently a consulting engineer in Boston and Newton, Massachusetts. Dr. Christian spent much of his career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and at Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation. Dr. Christian is a former chair of the American Society of Civil Engineering (ASCE) Geotechnical Engineering Division and of the U.S. National Society of the International Society of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering. An honorary member of ASCE and of the Boston Society of Civil Engineers Section, ASCE, Dr. Christian has been the recipient of several distinguished honors and awards, including the 2003 Terzaghi lecture. He has published over 90 papers and three books in the geotechnical and earthquake engineering

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation fields. In 1999, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. In 2003, he chaired the National Research Council (NRC) study “Completing the ‘Big Dig’: Managing the Final Stages of Boston’s Central Artery/Tunnel Project.” He is currently a member of the NRC’s Committee on Geological and Geotechnical Engineering. Dr. Christian holds a B.S., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Steven D. Glaser is a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, faculty geological scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and a research associate at the Intel Laboratory at Berkeley. Involvement in civil engineering began at age 17, when he began working as a union construction laborer in the Washington, D.C., area. While earning his degree in philosophy at Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts, he became an apprentice operation engineer. He worked as a driller for eight years in the D.C. area and in Iraq. This experience with geotechnical engineering led to enrollment in the civil engineering program at the University of Texas in 1981. Deborah J. Goodings is a geotechnical engineering professor in the Department of Civil Engineering, and codirector of the Engineering and Public Policy Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Goodings worked with Tippetts Abbett McCarthy Stratton Engineers and Architects for two years, focusing on the huge Tarbela Dam Project, before she joined the faculty at the University of Maryland in 1981. Her reseach interests include engineering and public policy, international development engineering, cold regions geotechnique, extreme heat geotechique, geoenvironmental engineering, cratering by sinkholes and by explosives, and ground improvement. Dr. Goodings serves as a member of the National Science and Engineering Research Council (Canada) Civil Engineering Grant Selection Committee, and as the chair of the Group AF Soil Mechanics Section of the Transportation Research Board. Dr. Goodings is a fellow of ASCE; a recipient of the Fred Burggraf Award from the NRC’s Transportation Research Board; a

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation corecipient of the Department of the Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal; and a recipient of the Distinguished Service Award of the U.S. Universities Council on Geotechnical Education and Research. She received her B.A.Sc. in civil engineering from the University of Toronto and her Ph.D. in Geotechnical Engineering from Cambridge University. She is a registered professional engineer. Edward Kavazanjian Jr. is associate professor of civil and environmental engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) in Tempe, Arizona. Prior to moving to ASU in 2004, Dr. Kavazanjian spent 20 years in engineering practice. He is recognized for his work on analysis and design of waste containment systems and on geotechnical aspects of earthquake engineering. He has served as engineer in charge of major infrastructure development projects involving up to $8.5 million in engineering services and $150 million in construction and as principal or co-principal investigator on geotechnical engineering research projects sponsored by the Department of Transportation, the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He currently serves on the Board of Governors of the Geo-Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers and as the chair of the Geoseismic Concerns subcommittee of the Transportation Research Board Committee on Seismic Design of Bridges. Dr. Kavazanjian holds an S.M. in geotechnical engineering, an S.B. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in geotechnical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. David W. Major is a principal of GeoSyntec Consultants, Inc. and obtained his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Waterloo where he studied the biodegradation of chlorinated and aromatic compounds in groundwater. For the past 18 years, he has worked with clients, researchers, and regulators to develop practical biological and chemical solutions to remediate contaminated sites. Dr. Major has served on national committees, including the steering committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Remediation Technologies

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation Development Forum Consortium on Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents and the EPA Science Advisory Board to review the efficacy of dense nonaqueous phase liquids treatment technologies, and presented to the National Research Council during its review of the state of the science of monitored natural attenuation and associated protocols. Dr. Major has made 25 national and international presentations and written over 40 relevant publications. James K. Mitchell is a University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining Virginia Tech in 1994, he spent 35 years on the civil engineering faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where he served as chair of the department from 1979 to 1984. He received his Sc.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Mitchell’s research interests are in geotechnical engineering, with emphasis on soil properties and behavior, ground improvement, environmental geotechnics, and in situ testing. Much of his recent work has focused on the application of knowledge in these areas to problems in environmental geotechnics and mitigation of seismic risk to earth structures. He is a widely-known and well-respected leader who has received many awards for notable research achievements and for international contributions to engineering practice and education. He has served on several NRC boards and committees including the Geotechnical Board (chair), Committee for Noninvasive Characterization of the Shallow Subsurface for Environmenatal and Engineering Applications, Committee on Subsurface Contamination at Department of Energy Complex Sites: Research Needs and Opportunities (vice chair), Committee for Review of the Hanford Site’s Environmental Remediation Science and Technology Plan, Panel on Review Procedures for Water Resources Project Planning (chair), and Committee on Organizing to Manage Construction and Infrastructure in the 21st Century Bureau of Reclamation (chair). He is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation Mary M. Poulton is the head of the Department of Mining and Geological Engineering at the University of Arizona. She joined the faculty at the University in 1990. Previously she worked as a mining engineer for Pittsburgh and Midway Coal Mining Company and as a hydraulic engineering technician for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Her main research interests include neural networks, geosensing, mineral and petroleum exploration, reservoir characterization, and groundwater management. Her other activities include serving as the chair of the Mining and Geothermal Committee of the Society for Exploration Geophysicists, vice-president of the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems for the Engineering and Environmental Engineering Society (2002-2003), vice-president of the Near Surface Geophysics Section of Society of Exploration Geophysicists (2000-2001), and as technical session chair for the Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Environmental and Engineering Problems 2002 in Las Vegas. She is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Geological and Geotechnical Engineering. She is cofounder and vice-president of the water management firm, NOAH LLC. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in geological engineering from the University of Arizona. J. Carlos Santamarina is the Goizueta Professor at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute for Technology. His research focuses on the fundamental study of soils and subsurface processes. These studies have involved the development and use of particle-level testing methodologies, high-resolution process monitoring systems (including combined elastic and electromagnetic waves), and inverse problems. This conceptual and experimental framework has allowed the study of problems in civil engineering systems (dynamic soil response, foundations), mining (clay minerals, crushed rock), and resource recovery (petroleum and methane hydrates). Current research emphasizes engineered particulate systems. Two coauthored books summarize salient concepts and research results. He is a corresponding member of the Argentinean National Academy of Science and National Academy

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Geological and Geotechnical Engineering in the New Millennium: Opportunities for Research and Technological Innovation Engineering. He holds a Ph.D. from Purdue University, an M.S. from the University of Maryland, and a B.Sc. from Universidad de Cordoba. STAFF Anthony R. de Souza is currently director of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Research Council in Washington, D.C. Previously, he was executive director of the National Geography Standards Project, secretary general of the 27th International Geographical Union Congress, editor of National Geographic Research & Exploration, and editor of the Journal of Geography. He has held positions as a professor and as a visiting teacher and scholar at the George Washington University, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, University of Minnesota, University of California, Berkeley, and University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. He has served as a member of NRC committees. He holds B.A. (honors) and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Reading in England and has received numerous honors and awards, including the Medalla al Benito Juarez in 1992 and the Gilbert Grosvenor honors award from the Association of American Geographers in 1996. His research interests include the processes and mechanisms of economic development and human-environment relationships. He has published several books and more than 100 articles, reports, and reviews.

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