Appendix B
Biographic Information on the Committee on Review of Western Alaska (AYK) Research and Restoration Plan for Salmon

Thomas Royer (Chair) is a Slover Professor of Oceanography for the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Royer earned his bachelors degree from Albion College, as well as an M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. For 33 years, Dr. Royer has carried out measurements of hydrography in the northeast Pacific from Alaska to Hawaii during all seasons of the year. This work led to the discovery of a significant coastal current along the coast of Alaska that is driven by freshwater discharge. He served as the University of Alaska Fairbanks Chancellor’s Faculty Associate for Research in 1992-1993, where he administered the research activities of that campus. He was awarded the Edith Bullock for excellence in service to the University of Alaska. He has been active in the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), having served on the Fleet Improvement Committee, the Advisory Council, and as vice chairman. He was chairman of a national committee that designed a new Arctic research vessel. In addition, Dr. Royer has served on the MMS Scientific Advisory Committee and on various committees of the National Research Council and its Ocean Studies Board. He is active in the international North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) and serves as a U.S. representative to the Technical Committee on Data Exchange of PICES. Dr. Royer also serves on the Scientific and Technical Committee of the Oil Spill Recovery Institute (OSRI) of the Prince William Sound Science Center (PWSSC), Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) of Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS), and the Science Panel of the North Pacific Research Board (NPRB).



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Review of the Draft Research and Restoration Plan for Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim (Western Alaska) Salmon Appendix B Biographic Information on the Committee on Review of Western Alaska (AYK) Research and Restoration Plan for Salmon Thomas Royer (Chair) is a Slover Professor of Oceanography for the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Royer earned his bachelors degree from Albion College, as well as an M.S. and Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. For 33 years, Dr. Royer has carried out measurements of hydrography in the northeast Pacific from Alaska to Hawaii during all seasons of the year. This work led to the discovery of a significant coastal current along the coast of Alaska that is driven by freshwater discharge. He served as the University of Alaska Fairbanks Chancellor’s Faculty Associate for Research in 1992-1993, where he administered the research activities of that campus. He was awarded the Edith Bullock for excellence in service to the University of Alaska. He has been active in the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), having served on the Fleet Improvement Committee, the Advisory Council, and as vice chairman. He was chairman of a national committee that designed a new Arctic research vessel. In addition, Dr. Royer has served on the MMS Scientific Advisory Committee and on various committees of the National Research Council and its Ocean Studies Board. He is active in the international North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) and serves as a U.S. representative to the Technical Committee on Data Exchange of PICES. Dr. Royer also serves on the Scientific and Technical Committee of the Oil Spill Recovery Institute (OSRI) of the Prince William Sound Science Center (PWSSC), Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) of Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (EVOS), and the Science Panel of the North Pacific Research Board (NPRB).

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Review of the Draft Research and Restoration Plan for Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim (Western Alaska) Salmon LaMont Albertson is guide and owner of Wilderness Experiences, a fishing and naturalist guide service in the Aniak River valley in Aniak, Alaska. He also serves as charter member of the Kuskokwim River Fisheries User Group, serving as a representative of sportfishing interests. In his career as an educator, Mr. Albertson has served as both director and president of the Kuskokwim Community College, and he has served as classroom and distance education instructor, principal, and personnel director of Alaskan educational institutions. He received a B.A. from Oklahoma Baptist University and an M.Ed. from the University of Florida and Florida Atlantic University. His postgraduate studies have been conducted through Cornell University and other academic institutions. Elizabeth Andrews has over 25 years experience in policy analysis, project and program management, and analytical research, all pertaining to the conservation and management of fisheries and wildlife resources in Alaska. In recent years, she was an assistant director with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G), and served as the department’s liaison with five federal agencies in Alaska for managing fisheries and wildlife in areas of overlapping management jurisdiction. Dr. Andrews is familiar with current relevant social science research in the AYK region and salmon management and has worked on the state’s response to the failure of salmon returns to the region. Throughout her career, Dr. Andrews worked in partnership with federal agencies as well as with fisheries organizations and other interested groups for the purposes of managing fisheries resources in Alaska. She has considerable experience working as a team member with various management entities and government resource managers in efforts to provide for multiple uses of fisheries resources in a balanced and meaningful way. Dr. Andrews left the committee in October 2005 to become director of the Subsistence Division of ADF&G. Ronald K. Dearborn is the former director of Alaska Sea Grant at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. His past professional experience also includes positions with the State of Maine Department of Environmental Protection and as sea grant director at the University of Maine. Mr. Dearborn earned an M.S. in ocean engineering from the University of Massachusetts and a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Maine. His professional interests include the impact of environmental change on marine resource populations and the challenges of resource management in a changing environment. Mr. Dearborn has served as president of the Sea Grant Association, 1987-1988 and 1997-1998.

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Review of the Draft Research and Restoration Plan for Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim (Western Alaska) Salmon Craig Fleener first entered the field of natural resource management in 1990 when he began working for his tribe. In 1991, he moved to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments to work on behalf of the tribes in his region. Most recently, Mr. Fleener has designed and implemented a three-phase research project collecting traditional ecological knowledge of salmon through interviews with tribe elders. He designed the project to identify historically active spawning grounds in an effort to restore these locations and enhance the salmon spawning in the upper Yukon. Mr. Fleener has attended Yukon River panel negotiations, salmon fisheries conferences, natural resource management conferences, and sat on resource advisory committees as a knowledgeable subsistence user, gaining an intricate knowledge of the overall fisheries management system within Alaska and of the body of knowledge related to salmon fisheries available today. Mr. Fleener has a B.S. in natural resources management (1999) from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and has continued study in wildlife biology, resources, and the environment at the University of Calgary. Robert Huggett is professor emeritus of zoology and the former vice president for research and graduate studies at Michigan State University. He also is professor emeritus of marine science at the College of William and Mary. Dr. Huggett's aquatic biogeochemistry research has involved the fate and effects of hazardous substances in aquatic systems with a focus on hydrophobic chemicals and their partitioning between sediment and pore water, which governs the chemicals' biological availability. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Huggett was the assistant administrator for research and development for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where his responsibilities included planning and directing EPA's $500 million-per-year research program. Dr. Huggett earned his Ph.D. at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. He also serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and served on the Committee on Endangered and Threatened Fishes in the Klamath River Basin. Nicholas Hughes is an assistant professor in the Fisheries Division for the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr. Hughes studies interactions between stream salmonids in freshwaters and their habitats. His theory is that stream habitat acts as a template, guiding the way natural selection shapes the ecology and be-

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Review of the Draft Research and Restoration Plan for Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim (Western Alaska) Salmon havior of individual fish and that large-scale properties such as distribution patterns, population dynamics, and community structure can be explained in terms of the ecology and behavior of individuals. He received a B.S. and an M.A. from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. from the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Cynthia M. Jones is professor of ocean, earth, and atmospheric sciences and director of the Center for Quantitative Fisheries Ecology at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. She received her B.A. in zoology (honors) at Boston University, as well as her M.S. and Ph.D. in oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. Her research interests are population dynamics, fisheries management, and population ecology. In addition, Dr. Jones has served on four National Research Council committees: the Committee for Review of the National Marine Fisheries Service: Use of Science and Data in Management and Litigation (chair, 2001-2002); the Committee on Improving the Collection and Use of Fisheries Data (1998-2000); the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods (1995-1997); and the Committee to Review Northeast Fishery Stock Assessments (1997). Katherine W. Myers has served as a fisheries biologist for the High Seas Salmon Research Program in the School of Aquatic & Fishery Sciences at University of Washington since 1981. Dr. Myers received a B.S. in fisheries at the University of Washington, an M.S. in fisheries at Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in fisheries at Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Japan. Her research interests include oceanic and biological processes affecting salmon growth and productivity. Dr. Myers has served as co-principal investigator for a study on the Gulf of Alaska salmon (research grant funded by U.S. GLOBEC/National Science Foundation) and as a principal investigator for a study on trawl chinook (research grant funded by Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Association/NOAA). In 2000, Dr. Myers received a Distinguished Service Award from the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists. She also has served as a U.S. salmon expert and U.S. editor for the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission. Dr. Myers continues to serve as a member of the commission’s Committee on Scientific Research and Statistics (1993-) and the U.S. member of the Science Sub-Committee (1998-).

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Review of the Draft Research and Restoration Plan for Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim (Western Alaska) Salmon Rosamond Lee Naylor is a senior fellow at the Center for Environmental Science and Policy (CESP) at Stanford University. She received her B.A. in economics and environmental studies from the University of Colorado, her M.S. in economics from the London School of Economics, and her Ph.D. in applied economics from Stanford University. Her research focuses on the environmental and equity dimensions of intensive food production. Dr. Naylor has been involved in a number of field-level research projects in Southeast Asia, Mexico, Micronesia, and North America (Pacific Northwest and Alaska) researching aquaculture development, salmon fisheries, high-input agricultural development, biotechnology, climate-induced yield variability, and food security. Dr. Naylor was named fellow in the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program in Environmental Sciences in 1999; Pew Fellow in Conservation and the Environment in 1994; and McNamara Fellow by the World Bank for her work on women and rural development in 1990. Jennifer Ruesink is an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Washington. Her research interests are marine community and population ecology, with an emphasis on thresholds in species and food-web interactions, introduced species, and ecological values of biological diversity and ecosystem functioning. Dr. Ruesink received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington. She has studied the ecological impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on the ecology of tidal communities in Prince William Sound, including work with National Academy of Sciences member Dr. Robert Paine. She also served on the National Research Council’s Committee to Review the Gulf of Alaska Ecosystem Monitoring Program (2000-2002). Roy A. Stein is a professor in the Department of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology at Ohio State University. He has a B.S. from the University of Michigan, an M.S. from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Stein has considerable direct experience with fishery management. His research interests are freshwater community ecology and fishery biology. He has been a U.S. commissioner on the Great Lakes Fishery Commission since 1998 and is currently serving as its vice chair. Dr. Stein also has served on the National Research Council’s Committee to Review the NOAA National Sea Grant College Program (1994).