spective on Advancing Technologies and Strategies for Managing Dual-Use Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

7  

National Intelligence Council. 2004. Mapping the Global Future, Report of the National Intelligence Council’s 2020 Project. Available online at www.cia.gov/nic/nic_globaltrend2020.htm#contents [accessed April 26, 2006].

8  

It should be noted that article X of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC), and Article XI of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), mandate peaceful cooperation among nations in biology and chemistry.

9  

Hoyt, K. and S.G. Brooks. 2003/2004. A double-edged sword. International Security 28(Winter):123-148.

10  

Dicken, P. 1998. Global Shift: Transforming the World Economy, Third Edition. New York: The Guilford Press.

11  

Mashelkar, R.A. 2005. India’s R&D: reaching for the top. Science 307(5714):1415-1417.

12  

See www.inpharm.com/External/InpH/1,2580,1-3-0-0-inp_intelligence_art-0-307722,00.html [accessed May 9, 2005].

13  

See www.ims-global.com/insight/news_story/0503/news_story_050330.htm [accessed May 9, 2005].

14  

Normile, D. and C.C. Mann. 2005. Asia jockeys for stem cell lead. Science 307(5710): 660-664.

15  

Although $400 billion was quoted at the Cuernavaca workshop by Terrence Taylor, a Frost & Sullivan analysis puts the figure at $447.5 billion for 2004. See www.frost.com/prod/servlet/vp-further-info.pag?mode=open&sid=2850225 [accessed May 5, 2005].

16  

From Terence Taylor’s presentation at the Cuernavaca workshop, September 21, 2004. National Research Council/Institute of Medicine. 2005. An International Perspective on Advancing Technologies and Strategies for Managing Dual-Use Risks. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; Table 3-2, pg. 38.

17  

See www.frost.com/prod/serv/vp-further-info.pag?mode=open&sid=2850225 [accessed May 9, 2005].

18  

Supra, note 16.

19  

Kinsella, K. and V.A. Velkoff. 2001. An Aging World: 2001. U.S. Census Bureau, Series P95/01-1. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

20  

See www.bio.org/speeches/pubs/er/statistics.asp [accessed May 6, 2005].

21  

Berg, C. et al. 2002. The evolution of biotech. Nature Reviews 1(11):845-846. Although these figures may not seem remarkable at first glance, they are impressive in light of the fact that this time period covered the dot-com crash.

22  

Ferrer, M. et al. 2004. The scientific muscle of Brazil’s health biotechnology. Nature Biotechnology 22(Suppl.):DC8-DC12.

23  

See www.larta.org/lavox/articlelinks/2004/040510_usisrael.asp [accessed May 9, 2005].

24  

Wong, J. et al. 2004. South Korean biotechnology—a rising industrial and scientific powerhouse. Nature Biotechnology 22(Suppl.):DC42-DC47.

25  

See www.jba.or.jp/eng/jba_e/index.html [accessed May 9, 2005].

26  

Biotechnology Industry Facts, 2005, http://www.bio.org/speeches/pubs/er/statistics.asp.



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