Appendix A
Biographies of Committee Members

John D. Spengler, Chair, is the Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard University’s School of Public Health. He has conducted research in the areas of personal monitoring, air pollution health effects, aerosol characterization, indoor air pollution, and air pollution meteorology. More recently, he has been involved in research that includes the integration of knowledge about indoor and outdoor air pollution as well as other risk factors into the design of housing, buildings, and communities. He uses the tools of life-cycle analysis, risk assessment, and activity-based costing as indicators to measure the sustainable attributes of alternative designs, practices, and community development. He serves as adviser to the World Health Organization on indoor air pollution, personal exposure, and air pollution epidemiology, and he has served as either a member or consultant on various U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board committees. He received a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in environmental health sciences from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the State University of New York-Albany.


Vivian E. Loftness, Vice Chair, is a professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University. She is an international energy and building performance consultant for commercial and residential building design and has researched and written extensively on energy conservation, passive solar design, climate, and regionalism in architecture. Professor Loftness has worked for many years with the Architectural and Building Sciences Division of Public Works Canada, researching and developing the issues of total building performance and the field of building diagnostics. Through the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium, she has been actively researching and designing high-performance office environments. Professor Loftness is a member of the advisory board at Johnson Controls and Owens-Corning Fiberglass Construction. She has been involved in international organizations including as resident, Executive Interchange Canada Architecture and Building Sciences, Department of Public Works Canada (October 1982 to June 1985) and as principal investigator, World Meteorological Organization, for Climate/Energy Graphics, and she has previously served on NRC committees. She holds a B.S. in architecture and a master’s of architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Charlene W. Bayer is the Research Institute Branch head, principal research scientist, and adjunct professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. A reviewer for the Journal of Chromatographic Science, Indoor Air, and Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, and periodically for a variety of other peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings, she has expertise in indoor environments, air quality, and related health concerns. Dr. Bayer is a past member of the ASHRAE Environmental Health Committee and serves on numerous other review committees for Underwriters’ Laboratories, the U.S. Environmental Protection



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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report Appendix A Biographies of Committee Members John D. Spengler, Chair, is the Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard University’s School of Public Health. He has conducted research in the areas of personal monitoring, air pollution health effects, aerosol characterization, indoor air pollution, and air pollution meteorology. More recently, he has been involved in research that includes the integration of knowledge about indoor and outdoor air pollution as well as other risk factors into the design of housing, buildings, and communities. He uses the tools of life-cycle analysis, risk assessment, and activity-based costing as indicators to measure the sustainable attributes of alternative designs, practices, and community development. He serves as adviser to the World Health Organization on indoor air pollution, personal exposure, and air pollution epidemiology, and he has served as either a member or consultant on various U.S. EPA Science Advisory Board committees. He received a B.S. in physics from the University of Notre Dame, an M.S. in environmental health sciences from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the State University of New York-Albany. Vivian E. Loftness, Vice Chair, is a professor of architecture at Carnegie Mellon University. She is an international energy and building performance consultant for commercial and residential building design and has researched and written extensively on energy conservation, passive solar design, climate, and regionalism in architecture. Professor Loftness has worked for many years with the Architectural and Building Sciences Division of Public Works Canada, researching and developing the issues of total building performance and the field of building diagnostics. Through the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium, she has been actively researching and designing high-performance office environments. Professor Loftness is a member of the advisory board at Johnson Controls and Owens-Corning Fiberglass Construction. She has been involved in international organizations including as resident, Executive Interchange Canada Architecture and Building Sciences, Department of Public Works Canada (October 1982 to June 1985) and as principal investigator, World Meteorological Organization, for Climate/Energy Graphics, and she has previously served on NRC committees. She holds a B.S. in architecture and a master’s of architecture from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Charlene W. Bayer is the Research Institute Branch head, principal research scientist, and adjunct professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. A reviewer for the Journal of Chromatographic Science, Indoor Air, and Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, and periodically for a variety of other peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings, she has expertise in indoor environments, air quality, and related health concerns. Dr. Bayer is a past member of the ASHRAE Environmental Health Committee and serves on numerous other review committees for Underwriters’ Laboratories, the U.S. Environmental Protection

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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report Agency, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the American Chemical Society. Dr. Bayer was a semifinalist in Discovery Magazine awards for Innovative Technology of Importance in 1999 and holds numerous patents for materials and devices for monitoring and improving air quality. Her current research includes a project to develop a personal monitoring vest able to monitor a variety of pollutants that are suspected as being asthmatic aggravators while linking these with pulmonary function tests sponsored by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. She holds a B.S. in chemistry form Baylor University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Emory University. John S. Bradley is a principal research officer at the National Research Council of Canada’s Institute for Research in Construction. Dr. Bradley is involved in the design of efficient procedures for making advanced acoustical measurements in rooms for speech and music, and the use of these quantities to evaluate such spaces more scientifically; measuring techniques for predicting and evaluating speech intelligibility in rooms, including school classrooms; noise control related to buildings, including for outdoor noises; and relationships between physical and subjective assessments of annoyance caused by noise from various sources. He is a fellow in the Acoustical Society of America, past president of the Canadian Acoustical Association, and a member of the Acoustical Society of America Technical Committee on Architectural Acoustics and the editorial board of the Audio Engineering Society. He has served on ANSI and ISO standards committees as well as the WHO working group for community noise guidelines. He holds a B.S. in physics and a master’s in physics/acoustics from the University of Western Ontario, and a Ph.D. in physics/acoustics from Imperial College, University of London. Glen I. Earthman is professor emeritus of educational administration at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His research interests extend to all phases of school facilities, with a concentration on exploring the relationship between school building condition and student achievement. Dr. Earthman has 40 years of experience in the field of education, serving as a teacher, principal, and executive director for school facility planning in the Philadelphia public schools, where he directed a staff of 250 professional planners and architects engaged in all activities associated with planning school facilities and monitoring the construction and evaluation of the resultant buildings. He is a member and past officer of the International Society for Educational Planning and the Council of Educational Facility Planners, International (CEFPI). He received the CEFPI President’s Award for planning activities in 1992 and the Planner of the Year Award in 1994. He holds a B.A. and a master’s degree from the University of Denver and a Ph.D. from the University of Northern Colorado, where he served as a graduate fellow in the School Planning Laboratory. Peyton A. Eggleston is the director of the Center for Children’s Environmental Health at Johns Hopkins University, a center of excellence sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and one of EPA’s National Centers for Environmental Research. He is also a professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His research focus is environmental allergens—their role in respiratory diseases (in particular, asthma), risk factors for sensitization, means of avoidance, and methods and effectiveness of indoor environmental control. He is credited with more than 190 publications and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. He has served as a member of the Board of Allergy and Immunology and is an active member of the Academy

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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology. Dr. Eggleston received his medical degree from the University of Virginia and training in pediatrics and allergy-immunology at the University of Washington. Paul Fisette is the director and an associate professor of building materials and wood technology and an associate professor of architecture at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Professor Fisette’s research and professional focus involve the performance of building systems, energy-efficient construction, sustainable building practices, and the performance of building materials. He has developed an innovative Web service that provides technical advice on the performance, specification, and use of building materials. Professor Fisette has written more than 200 published works on building science and construction technology. Previous to his current position, he owned and operated a general contracting business and was a senior editor with Custom Builder Magazine, covering technical information and innovations of interest to small- and medium-sized residential building firms. Professor Fisette is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment (BICE) and a contributing editor for the Journal of Light Construction, and he has served on a variety of editorial and professional advisory boards. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in wood science and technology from the University of Massachusetts. Caroline Breese Hall, M.D., is a professor of pediatrics and medicine in infectious diseases at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. At Rochester her research has focused on virology, especially respiratory syncytial virus, human herpes virus 6, and vaccines, resulting in more than 500 published articles. Among the national positions Dr. Hall has held are president of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society; member of the Red Book Committee for 8 years and chairman for 4 years; and member of the CDC’s Advisory Committee of Immunization Practices, the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center of Infectious Diseases, committees for the Institute of Medicine, the American Board for Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and the Subboard for Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Among the awards she has received are the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society Distinguished Physician Award and the Clinical Virology Award from the Pan American Society of Virology, as well as being named among the best doctors in America and among the top 20 women physicians in America. She graduated from Wellesely College and Rochester Medical School and did her subsequent residency training at Yale, followed by fellowships first in pediatric infectious diseases and then allergy and immunology in the Department of Medicine at Yale University. Gary T. Henry is a professor of policy studies in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University, where he specializes in educational policy, school accountability, and program evaluation. He previously served as the director of evaluation and learning services for the David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Dr. Henry has evaluated a variety of policies and programs, including pre-K and the HOPE Scholarship program in Georgia as well as school reforms and accountability systems. He has served as the director of the university’s Applied Research Center. He is the author of Practical Sampling (Sage 1990) and Graphing Data (Sage 1995) and co-author of Evaluation: An Integrated Framework for Understanding, Guiding, and Improving Policies and Programs (Jossey-Bass

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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report 2000), and he has published extensively in the field of evaluation and policy analysis. In addition, he served as deputy secretary of education for the Commonwealth of Virginia and chief methodologist with the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission for the Virginia General Assembly. He received the Evaluation of the Year Award from the American Evaluation Association in 1998 for his work with Georgia’s Council for School Performance and the Joseph Wholey Distinguished Scholarship Award in 2001 from the American Society for Public Administration and the Center for Accountability and Performance. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Clifford S. Mitchell is an associate professor and director of the Occupational Medicine Residency Program at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research interests include indoor air quality and its effects on human health in schools and in office buildings. He holds a B.A. from Williams College, an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an M.D. from Case Western Reserve, and an M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. Mark S. Rea is the director of the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), a position he has held since 1988. He is also a professor at the School of Architecture and in the Department of Philosophy, Psychology, and Cognitive Science at RPI. Prior to RPI he was the manager of the Indoor Environment Program, Building Performance Section at the National Research Council of Canada. He also has been a visiting scientist at the Electricity Council Research Centre, Capenhurst, United Kingdom. He is a fellow of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America and of the Society of Light and Lighting (United Kingdom). He is on the international editorial advisory board of the Lighting Research and Technology Journal and is editor-in-chief of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America Lighting Handbook (8th and 9th editions). He received the William H. Wiley Distinguished Faculty Award from RPI and the Gold Medal from the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. Dr. Rea received a B.S. in psychology and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in biophysics from Ohio State University. Henry Sanoff is professor emeritus of architecture at the North Carolina State University College of Design. He came to the College of Design in 1966 from the University of California, Berkeley, where he was an assistant professor. He is a member of the Academy of Outstanding Teachers and has been designated an Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor. Mr. Sanoff teaches courses related to community participation, social architecture, design research, design methodology, and design programming. He has been a visiting lecturer and scholar at more than 85 institutions in the United States and abroad. He is the U.S. editor of The Journal of Design Studies and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Architecture and Planning Research. Professor Sanoff is also recognized as one of the founders of the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) in 1969. His research has concentrated on the areas of social housing, children’s environments, community arts, aging populations, and community participation. Professor Sanoff received a bachelor of architecture and a master of architecture from Pratt Institute. Carol H. Weiss is the Beatrice B. Whiting Professor of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she teaches in the areas of administration, planning, and social

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Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools: An Interim Report policy. Her courses include evaluation methods, research methods, use of research as a strategy for change, and organizational decision making. She has published 11 books, 3 of which are on evaluation and 5 on the uses of research and evaluation in policy making. Her recent work is about the influences on educational policy making exerted by information, ideology, interests, information, and institutional constraints. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, a congressional fellow under the sponsorship of the American Sociological Association, a senior fellow at the U.S. Department of Education, and a member of seven panels of the National Academy of Sciences. She is on editorial boards for the Teachers College Record, Journal of Educational Change, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education and Development, American Behavioral Scientist, and others. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. Suzanne M. Wilson is a professor of teacher education in the Department of Teacher Education Michigan State University. She is an educational psychologist with an interest in teacher learning and teacher knowledge. Her studies include the capacities and commitment of exemplary secondary school history and mathematics teachers, and she has written extensively on the knowledge base of teaching. She recently concluded a longitudinal study of the relationship between educational policy and teaching practice by examining efforts to reform mathematics teaching in California. She is also the director of the Center for the Scholarship of Teaching. Her areas of expertise include curriculum policy, history of teachers and teaching, mathematics reform, teacher assessment, teacher education and learning, and teaching history. Dr. Wilson earned her Ph.D. from Stanford University.