Box 4-1
Categorization of Food Security Status of Households According to the Number of Affirmed Items on the Food Security Scale

Households without children (based on responses to the 10 adult and household items):

Food secure = households that denied all items or affirmed 1 or 2 items


Food insecure without hunger = households that affirmed 3, 4, or 5 items


Food insecure with hunger = households that affirmed 6 or more items

Households with children (based on responses to all 18 items):

Food secure = households that denied all items or affirmed 1 or 2 items


Food insecure without hunger = households that affirmed 3 to 7 items


Food insecure with hunger = households that affirmed 8 or more items

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCEPTS AND QUESTIONS

The validity of the questions used can be assessed in many ways. Content validity refers to the degree to which the items currently included in a scale represent the various facets of the concept to be measured (see Bohrnstedt, 1983)—in this case, the components of food security, food insecurity, and food insecurity with hunger. This section considers the relationships among the three major categories of food insecurity and hunger (whether the household experienced uncertainty, insufficiency in quality of food, or reduced food intake or the feeling of hunger).

1. Household experience of uncertainty and food depletion (Questions 1 and 2, Box 2-1). The first area of inquiry concerns whether or not the respondent has experienced an “anxiety or perception that the household food budget or food supply was inadequate” (Bickel, Nord, Price, Hamilton, and Cook, 2000). The questions ask about worrying if the food would run out before they got money to buy more, and whether what they bought just



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