Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$48.00



View/Hide Left Panel

REFERENCES

1. U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates and Projections. http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/pop1/asp. Accessed July 21, 2005.

2. U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates and Projections. http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/pop3/asp. Accessed July 21, 2005.

3. U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates and Projections. http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/pop3/asp. Accessed July 21, 2005.

4. Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. America’s Children: Key Indicators of Well-Being. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2005.

5. National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2004, with Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 2004.

6. Newacheck PW and Benjamin AE. Intergenerational equity and public spending. Health Affairs 23:142–146, 2004.

7. U.S. Census Bureau Population Estimates and Projections. http://childstats.gov/americaschildren/hea1/asp. Accessed July 21, 2005.

8. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. Children’s Health, the Nation’s Wealth: Assessing and Improving Child Health. Committee on the Evaluation of Children’s Health. Board of Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2004.

9. Chatterji S, Ustun B, Sadana R, Salamon JA, Mathers CD, and Murray CJL. The conceptual basis for measuring and reporting on health. Global Programme on Evidence for Health Policy Discussion Paper 45. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 2002.

10. U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. Technology-Dependent Children: Hospital v. Home Care: A Technical Memorandum. OTA-TM-H-38. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, May 1987.

11. Stein REK and Jessop DJ. Functional status II(R): a measure of child health status. Medical Care 28:1041–1055, 1990.

12. Newacheck PW, Budetti PP, and Halfon N. Trends in activity-limiting chronic conditions among children. American Journal of Public Health 76:178–184, 1986.

13. Newacheck PN, Stein REK, Bauman LJ, et al. Disparities in the prevalence of disability between black and white children. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 157:244–248, 2003.

14. Newacheck PW and Halfon N. Prevalence and impact of disabling chronic conditions in childhood. American Journal of Public Health 88:610–617, 1998.

15. Child Trends Data Bank. www.childtrendsdatabank.org. Accessed July 21, 2005.

16. Perrin JM and Stein REK: Reinterpreting disability: changes in SSI for children. Pediatrics 88:1047–1051, 1992.

17. Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, Office of Research, Evaluation and Statistics. Children Receiving SSI, December 2003. SSA Publication 13-11830. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2005.

18. Sullivan v. Zebley, 88–1377. U.S. Supreme Court, February 20, 1990.

19. Perrin JM, Kuhlthau K, McLaughlin TJ, Etner SL, and Gortmaker SL. Changing patterns of conditions among children receiving Supplemental Security Income disability benefits. Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine 153:80–84, 1999.

20. Stein REK. Measurement of children’s health. Ambulatory Pediatrics 4:365–370, 2004.

21. Gortmaker S and Sappenfield W. Chronic childhood disorders: prevalence and impact. Pediatric Clinics of North America 31:3–18, 1984.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement