1
Statement of Work

The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will conduct a two-day workshop under the sponsorship of the dean of engineering, Salish Kootenai College, a tribally controlled college located in Pablo, Montana. The purpose of the workshop is to provide expert, objective, independent advice to 11 tribal colleges that are working together to offer engineering programs. The workshop will provide advice for the initiation, development, implementation, and sustainment of engineering programs at these colleges.

The NAE president will appoint an ad hoc committee of no more than six people to manage, guide, and report on the proceedings of a workshop of approximately 20 invited experts. The workshop invitees will be provided with available documentation and informational presentations, as required. The final product of this workshop will be a letter report to the sponsor that responds to the following questions1:

  1. What do Native Americans bring to the practice of engineering that is unique?

  2. What does it mean to incorporate cultural relevance into engineering studies?

  3. How can Native American cultures be incorporated into modern engineering curricula?

  4. What are the most effective ways to attract Native American students to engineering studies, to retain these students, and to motivate them to obtain advanced degrees?

  5. What are the most effective ways to motivate them to follow careers in engineering?

  6. What can tribal colleges do for their Native American constituencies that existing mainstream institutions cannot do?

  7. Is there an educational advantage to student and faculty exchange programs between tribal colleges and mainstream institutions?

  8. What is the most appropriate model for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining engineering studies at the tribal colleges?

  9. How can engineering studies be implemented so that a process for continuous improvement becomes an integral part of the model?

  10. What financial strategies will enable tribal colleges to sustain engineering programs in the long term?

  11. What are the most effective methodologies for teaching engineering at the tribal colleges in order to meet the needs of Native American constituencies?

  12. How can these methodologies be applied to instill the concept of lifelong learning in the student?

The committee’s final letter report is intended to be used as a roadmap for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining courses, course sequences, and pre-engineering and

1  

Questions 2 and 3 in the Statement of Work were combined to form Question 2 in the report; Questions 4 and 5 were combined to form Question 3 in the report.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 1
Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities 1 Statement of Work The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) will conduct a two-day workshop under the sponsorship of the dean of engineering, Salish Kootenai College, a tribally controlled college located in Pablo, Montana. The purpose of the workshop is to provide expert, objective, independent advice to 11 tribal colleges that are working together to offer engineering programs. The workshop will provide advice for the initiation, development, implementation, and sustainment of engineering programs at these colleges. The NAE president will appoint an ad hoc committee of no more than six people to manage, guide, and report on the proceedings of a workshop of approximately 20 invited experts. The workshop invitees will be provided with available documentation and informational presentations, as required. The final product of this workshop will be a letter report to the sponsor that responds to the following questions1: What do Native Americans bring to the practice of engineering that is unique? What does it mean to incorporate cultural relevance into engineering studies? How can Native American cultures be incorporated into modern engineering curricula? What are the most effective ways to attract Native American students to engineering studies, to retain these students, and to motivate them to obtain advanced degrees? What are the most effective ways to motivate them to follow careers in engineering? What can tribal colleges do for their Native American constituencies that existing mainstream institutions cannot do? Is there an educational advantage to student and faculty exchange programs between tribal colleges and mainstream institutions? What is the most appropriate model for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining engineering studies at the tribal colleges? How can engineering studies be implemented so that a process for continuous improvement becomes an integral part of the model? What financial strategies will enable tribal colleges to sustain engineering programs in the long term? What are the most effective methodologies for teaching engineering at the tribal colleges in order to meet the needs of Native American constituencies? How can these methodologies be applied to instill the concept of lifelong learning in the student? The committee’s final letter report is intended to be used as a roadmap for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining courses, course sequences, and pre-engineering and 1   Questions 2 and 3 in the Statement of Work were combined to form Question 2 in the report; Questions 4 and 5 were combined to form Question 3 in the report.

OCR for page 1
Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities engineering degree curricula at the partner tribal colleges. The letter report may make recommendations for further workshops and formal NAE studies, as appropriate. The National Academies has developed interim policies and procedures to implement Section 15 of the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. § 15. Section 15 includes certain requirements regarding public access and conflicts of interest that are applicable to agreements under which the National Academies, through a committee, provides advice or recommendations to a federal agency. In accordance with Section 15 of FACA, the National Academies shall submit to the government sponsor(s) following delivery of each applicable report a certification that the policies and procedures of the National Academies that implement Section 15 of FACA have been substantially complied with in the performance of the contract/grant/cooperative agreement with respect to the applicable report. In order to inform the public of National Academies activities and provide an opportunity for public comments on those activities, the National Academies may post on its website (http://www.national-academies.org) the following information, as appropriate under its procedures: (1) notices of meetings open to the public; (2) brief descriptions of projects; (3) committee appointments, if any (including biographies of committee members); (4) report information; and (5) other pertinent information.