identifying engineering education best practices that are consistent with the values and goals of tribal college constituency groups and enable TCUs to learn from the experiences of both mainstream and nontraditional programs and identify a “niche” for a Native engineering program.


Recommendation 4. Informed by the results of research and benchmarking, the working group should cooperate with the advisory group to further develop the management plan, explore feasible models for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining engineering studies at tribal colleges, and address the issue of buy-in by other TCUs for the proposed plan.


Recommendation 5. If there is consensus that a four-year tribal college-based program is needed, the implementation plan should be modified to be consistent with the resources available. At the present time, it appears that the resources dedicated to planning the second and third four-year engineering programs would be better spent to increase the number of TCUs that offer associate degrees and improve STEM courses at all of the partner schools. This would ultimately improve recruitment opportunities for one four-year engineering program.


Recommendation 6. The management plan should include an explanation of how the proposed program would build on, and be informed by, initiatives funded by National Science Foundation programs, such as Tribal Colleges University Program, and national outreach activities of organizations, such as MESA. This would strengthen the plan and, perhaps, increase buy-in for the initiative from tribal constituency groups and funding agencies.


Recommendation 7. Faculty and student exchange programs and partnerships between TCUs and mainstream institutions local industry/business and local, state, and national government organizations should be essential components of a strategy for developing TCU-based engineering programs.


Recommendation 8. Federal funding for tribal colleges/universities should be significantly increased.


Recommendation 9. Because of the importance of tribal elders in Native communities, they should be enlisted in the effort to educate K–12 students about engineering and how engineering training and skills could help Native communities.

References

AAES (American Association of Engineering Societies). 2005. Diversity. Available online at: http://www.aaes.org/diversity/index.asp.

ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). 2005. Information for Programs Seeking Initial Accreditation. Available online at: http://www.abet.org/new_program.

Adelman, C. 1999. Answers in the Toolbox: Academic Intensity, Attendance Patterns, and Bachelor Degree Attainment. Jessup, Md.: Education Publication Center.



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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities identifying engineering education best practices that are consistent with the values and goals of tribal college constituency groups and enable TCUs to learn from the experiences of both mainstream and nontraditional programs and identify a “niche” for a Native engineering program. Recommendation 4. Informed by the results of research and benchmarking, the working group should cooperate with the advisory group to further develop the management plan, explore feasible models for initiating, developing, implementing, and sustaining engineering studies at tribal colleges, and address the issue of buy-in by other TCUs for the proposed plan. Recommendation 5. If there is consensus that a four-year tribal college-based program is needed, the implementation plan should be modified to be consistent with the resources available. At the present time, it appears that the resources dedicated to planning the second and third four-year engineering programs would be better spent to increase the number of TCUs that offer associate degrees and improve STEM courses at all of the partner schools. This would ultimately improve recruitment opportunities for one four-year engineering program. Recommendation 6. The management plan should include an explanation of how the proposed program would build on, and be informed by, initiatives funded by National Science Foundation programs, such as Tribal Colleges University Program, and national outreach activities of organizations, such as MESA. This would strengthen the plan and, perhaps, increase buy-in for the initiative from tribal constituency groups and funding agencies. Recommendation 7. Faculty and student exchange programs and partnerships between TCUs and mainstream institutions local industry/business and local, state, and national government organizations should be essential components of a strategy for developing TCU-based engineering programs. Recommendation 8. Federal funding for tribal colleges/universities should be significantly increased. Recommendation 9. Because of the importance of tribal elders in Native communities, they should be enlisted in the effort to educate K–12 students about engineering and how engineering training and skills could help Native communities. References AAES (American Association of Engineering Societies). 2005. Diversity. Available online at: http://www.aaes.org/diversity/index.asp. ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). 2005. Information for Programs Seeking Initial Accreditation. Available online at: http://www.abet.org/new_program. Adelman, C. 1999. Answers in the Toolbox: Academic Intensity, Attendance Patterns, and Bachelor Degree Attainment. Jessup, Md.: Education Publication Center.

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