Appendix I
Management Plan of the Working Group

DEVELOPING, IMPLEMENTING, AND SUSTAINING ENGINEERING STUDIES AT THE TRIBAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (TCUs)


How We Got Here—Where We’re Going

Washington, D.C.

December 2004


Presented on Behalf of the Working Group on Engineering Studies at the Tribal Colleges and Universities



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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities Appendix I Management Plan of the Working Group DEVELOPING, IMPLEMENTING, AND SUSTAINING ENGINEERING STUDIES AT THE TRIBAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES (TCUs) How We Got Here—Where We’re Going Washington, D.C. December 2004 Presented on Behalf of the Working Group on Engineering Studies at the Tribal Colleges and Universities

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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities A BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN ENGINEERING FROM THE TCUs? In March 2004, 11 tribal colleges formed the Working Group on Engineering Studies at the Tribal Colleges and Universities and approved a Management Plan. Blackfeet Community College, MT Chief Dull Knife College, MT College of Menominee Nation, WI Crownpoint Institute of Technology, NM Fort Berthold Community College, ND Haskell Indian Nations University, KS Salish Kootenai College, MT Sitting Bull College, ND Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute, NM United Tribes Technical College, ND White Earth Tribal and Community College, MN Overall Goal: Develop culturally relevant programs that will enable a Native American student to proceed from pre-curriculum preparation through a fully-accredited bachelor of science degree in engineering entirely within the tribal college system. The partners attended a workshop sponsored by ABET, Inc., in June 2004.

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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities PRELIMINARY FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL NEEDS Common Admin Needs (Working Group, Advisory Cttee, NAE Workshop) $207K $95K $95K $95K $95K Total: $587K Blackfeet Community College—AS, Pre-engineering $149K $147K $168K $175K $181K Total: $820K Chief Dull Knife College Pending College of Menominee Nation—AS, Materials Science and Engineering $144K $125K $125K $105K $80K Total: $579K Crownpoint Institute of Technology—AS, Engineering $207K $246K $234K $222K $230K Total: $1,139K Fort Berthold Community College—AAS, Electrical Engineering Technology* $114K $113K $170K $181K $188K Total: $766K Haskell Indian Nations University—AS, Natural Sciences with Pre-Engineering Concentration Budget allocated by BIA Salish Kootenai College—BS, Computer Engineering* $193K $225K $219K $218K $219K Total: $1,074K *   Currently identified for ABET accreditation.

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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities PRELIMINARY FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL NEEDS (CONTINUED) Sitting Bull College—AS, Engineering $134K $134K $134K $139K $144K Total: $685K Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute—AS, Civil, Electrical, Mechanical Engineering* $416K $399K $416K $424K $432K Total: $2,087K Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute—Distance Education for the Partners $289K $138K $137K $137K $137K Total: $838K United Tribes Technical College—AAS, Engineering $171K $222K $226K $229K $237K Total: $1,085K White Earth Tribal and Community College—AS, Bioengineering $198K $214K $205K $203K $202K Total: $1,022K Preliminary Program Total: $10,682K *   Currently offers Civil Engineering Technology and Electronics Technology, both identified for ABET accreditation, the latter in the next review cycle.

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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities WHAT IS THE WORKING GROUP’S PRESENT STATUS? The model described in the Management Plan was very well received by the Washington, D.C., community. The Working Group has been awarded $150K in grants since March 2004. Four of the eleven partners are currently represented on the Working Group by their presidents or acting presidents. At its October 2004 meeting, the group set general funding criteria. Degreed engineers, not development of coursework, is the measure of success or failure. Fund the critical programs first (i.e., those requiring immediate development of mathematics courses), but fund the whole program, not just the math courses. Fund the partners in such an order that, as the students progress, they have somewhere to go next. Include the capability to recruit, motivate, mentor, tutor, and retain students. Include funds for preparatory class work and for laboratories and equipment. Work together to leverage opportunities. Treat distance education as its own enterprise. Ensure adequate administrative support.

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Engineering Studies at Tribal Colleges and Universities WHAT ARE THE WORKING GROUP’S NEXT STEPS? Request a budget update from the partners (December 2004). Work with interested Executive/Legislative Branch organizations to obtain initial five-year funding. Seek long-term sustainability via private foundations and corporations. Conduct National Academy of Engineering Workshop (January 2005). Plan and assign Working Group implementation tasks (April 2005). Development of Working Group subgroups. Develop common standards to permit seamless transfer of students among partners. Curriculum development. Distance education.