Appendix A
Biographical Information on the Committee on State Practices in Setting Mobile Source Emissions Standards

David Allen is the Melvin Gertz Regents Professor in Chemical Engineering and the director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Resources at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr Allen is a member of the EPA Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis. He has held regular faculty appointments at the University of California Los Angeles and the University of Texas, and he has held visiting faculty appointments at the California Institute of Technology, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Allen’s research interests lie in environmental reaction engineering, particularly issues related to air quality and pollution prevention. Dr. Allen served on the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and has served on several NRC committees. He served as chair of the Texas Council on Environmental Technology, which provides advice to the state of Texas on the use of innovative air quality improvement technologies. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering, with distinction, from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology.


John Bailar, III, is professor emeritus in the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. Dr. Bailar previously held an appointment as a senior scientist in the EPAHealth and Environmental Review Division. He also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks from chemical hazards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 320
State and Federal Standards for Mobile-Source Emissions Appendix A Biographical Information on the Committee on State Practices in Setting Mobile Source Emissions Standards David Allen is the Melvin Gertz Regents Professor in Chemical Engineering and the director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Resources at the University of Texas at Austin. Dr Allen is a member of the EPA Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis. He has held regular faculty appointments at the University of California Los Angeles and the University of Texas, and he has held visiting faculty appointments at the California Institute of Technology, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the University of California Santa Barbara. Dr. Allen’s research interests lie in environmental reaction engineering, particularly issues related to air quality and pollution prevention. Dr. Allen served on the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and has served on several NRC committees. He served as chair of the Texas Council on Environmental Technology, which provides advice to the state of Texas on the use of innovative air quality improvement technologies. He received his B.S. in chemical engineering, with distinction, from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. John Bailar, III, is professor emeritus in the Department of Health Studies at the University of Chicago. He is a retired commissioned officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and worked for the National Cancer Institute for 22 years. Dr. Bailar previously held an appointment as a senior scientist in the EPAHealth and Environmental Review Division. He also held academic appointments at Harvard University and McGill University. Dr. Bailar’s research interests include assessing health risks from chemical hazards and air pollutants and interpreting statistical evidence

OCR for page 320
State and Federal Standards for Mobile-Source Emissions in medicine, with a special emphasis on cancer. He was editor-in-chief of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute for 6 years and a member of the editorial board of the New England Journal of Medicine for 7 years. Dr. Bailar was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1993 and is a member of the International Statistical Institute. He received his M.D. from Yale University and his Ph.D. in statistics from American University. Hugh Ellis is the chair of the Department of Civil Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and he holds a joint appointment in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering. His research interests focus on the development of uncertainty and risk-based approaches for environmental management, including the use of such techniques for assessing air quality and emissions control policies in Maryland. He served on the NRC Committee on the Effectiveness of Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Programs. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Alison Geyh is an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research interests focus on quantifying airborne contaminants, identifying their sources, investigating their chemical composition, and assessing the routes of human exposure. Her current projects include an assessment of personal exposure to mobile-source related pollutants, an examination of the metal content of ambient fine particulate matter, and an exploration of the potential relationship between exposure to fine particles and exacerbations of symptoms related to congestive heart failure. She is the principal investigator of a large ongoing project focused on assessing exposure and health outcome of workers who were involved in the cleanup and recovery effort at the World Trade Center disaster site. Dr. Geyh previously held an appointment as a staff scientist for the Health Effects Institute, which is funded jointly by EPA and the automotive industry. Dr. Geyh received her Ph.D. from Brandeis University in physical organic chemistry. David Greene is a corporate fellow of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). His research interests are in energy and environmental policy analysis in the transportation sector, including analyses of policies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, modeling of energy and transportation demand, and assessment of the economics of petroleum dependence and market responses to advanced transpor-

OCR for page 320
State and Federal Standards for Mobile-Source Emissions tation technologies and alternative fuels. After joining ORNL in 1977, he founded the Transportation Energy Group in 1980 and later established the Transportation Research Section in 1987. Also, Dr. Greene was a senior research analyst in the Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy, U. S. Department of Energy. He is past chair and member emeritus of the Transportation Research Board’s Energy Committee, past chair of the Section on Environmental and Energy Concerns, and a lifetime national associate of the National Academies. Dr. Greene received his B.A. from Columbia University, M.A. from the University of Oregon, and Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. James Lents is director of the Environmental Policy and Corporate Affiliates Program at the University of California Riverside. Dr. Lents joined the university after managing air quality improvement projects nationwide, including 11 years as executive officer of the South Coast Air Quality Management District in Diamond Bar, California. His experience includes work in defining the emissions inventory development, modeling, and emissions control process for Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Denver, Colorado. His work in Colorado included oversight of the efforts to evaluate air quality impacts of oil shale production during the oil shale boom of the late 1970s and early 1980s. He served on the NRC Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States. Dr. Lents received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee (Space Institute) in physics. Gary Marchant is a professor of law and executive director and faculty fellow of the Center for the Study of Law, Science, and Technology in the College of Law at Arizona State University. Dr. Marchant teaches environmental law, science and technology, genetics and the law, and environmental justice. Before joining the ASU faculty, he was a partner at the Washington, DC, office of the law firm of Kirkland & Ellis, where his practice focused on environmental and administrative law. As part of this work, he represented the two major U.S. trade associations of motor vehicle manufacturers on a variety of regulatory and preemption litigation matters relating to federal, California, and Northeast States motor vehicle emission standards. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in genetics from the University of British Columbia, his M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government of Harvard University, and his J.D. from Harvard Law School.

OCR for page 320
State and Federal Standards for Mobile-Source Emissions Virginia McConnell is a senior fellow in the Quality of the Environment Division of Resources for the Future (RFF). She is also a professor of economics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Her recent work has centered on the evaluation of policies to reduce motor vehicle pollution, including the analysis of inspection and maintenance programs, old-car scrap programs, and emissions taxes. Dr. McConnell is a member of the EPA Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance Analysis and has served on other EPA advisory committees. She has analyzed market-based policies for improving land use and the impact of environmental regulations on industry productivity. Dr. McConnell served on the NRC Committee on the Effectiveness of Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Programs. She received her B.S. in economics from Smith College and her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland. Alison Pollack is a Principal at ENVIRON Corporation, an environmental consulting firm. Her work is primarily in the analysis of on-road and off-road mobile-source emissions data, the estimation of mobile-source emissions inventories, the development and evaluation of on-road and off-road mobile-source emissions models, and the evaluation of mobile-source control measures. Ms. Pollack’s research and consulting work has mostly been funded by state and federal agencies. She served on the NRC Committee to Review EPA’s Mobile Source Emissions Factor (MOBILE) Model and the Committee on the Effectiveness of Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Programs. Ms. Pollack received her B.S. and M.S. in statistics from Princeton University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, respectively. Harold Schock is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Michigan State University. Dr. Schock is the owner of Mid Michigan Research, LLC, an engineering research and design company. His research interests include flow and combustion phenomena in internal combustion engines using laser-based experimental techniques and numerical simulations, wear studies of mechanical parts using implanted radioisotopes, and flow physics in an automotive torque converter. Dr. Schock’s research has been funded by a number of sources, including industry and federal agencies. He served on the NRC Committee on Mobile Electric Power Plant Technologies. Dr. Schock received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at Michigan Technological University.

OCR for page 320
State and Federal Standards for Mobile-Source Emissions Karl Springer was the vice president for Automotive Products and Emissions Research at Southwest Research Institute (retired). His research interests have focused on the measurement and control of air pollution emissions from on-road and off-road vehicles and equipment powered by internal combustion engines. Mr. Springer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He served on the NRC Committee on Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas. He received a B.S.M.E. from Texas A&M and an M.S. in physics from Trinity University.