F
Committee on the Disposition of the Air Force Health Study

David Tollerud, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is Professor and Associate Director of the Institute for Public Health Research, School of Public Health/Health Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Kentucky. He has extensive clinical training, with specialty board certifications in internal medicine, pulmonary and critical care medicine, and occupational medicine. Dr. Tollerud has research expertise in environmental and occupational health, epidemiology, and immunology, and consulting experience in the areas of occupational and environmental respiratory disease, medical surveillance, and workplace injury prevention programs. He currently serves on the IOM’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices and the Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides in Vietnam, and has served on a number of other IOM committees since 1992.


Dan G. Blazer, III, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. (IOM member), is the JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. During Dr. Blazer’s tenure as Dean of Medical Education, he expanded a Master of Public Health program for medical school students that now attracts over 20 percent of the medical school class. Dr. Blazer is the author or editor of over 20 books and author or co-author of over 250 peer-reviewed articles on topics including depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the IOM with expertise in medical education, religion and medicine, and preventive medicine and public health. He was elected to the IOM in 1995.



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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study F Committee on the Disposition of the Air Force Health Study David Tollerud, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is Professor and Associate Director of the Institute for Public Health Research, School of Public Health/Health Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Kentucky. He has extensive clinical training, with specialty board certifications in internal medicine, pulmonary and critical care medicine, and occupational medicine. Dr. Tollerud has research expertise in environmental and occupational health, epidemiology, and immunology, and consulting experience in the areas of occupational and environmental respiratory disease, medical surveillance, and workplace injury prevention programs. He currently serves on the IOM’s Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices and the Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides in Vietnam, and has served on a number of other IOM committees since 1992. Dan G. Blazer, III, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. (IOM member), is the JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. During Dr. Blazer’s tenure as Dean of Medical Education, he expanded a Master of Public Health program for medical school students that now attracts over 20 percent of the medical school class. Dr. Blazer is the author or editor of over 20 books and author or co-author of over 250 peer-reviewed articles on topics including depression, epidemiology, and consultation liaison psychiatry. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the IOM with expertise in medical education, religion and medicine, and preventive medicine and public health. He was elected to the IOM in 1995.

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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study Ellen Wright Clayton, M.D., J.D., is the Rosalind E. Franklin Professor of Genetics and Health Policy; Co-Director, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society; Senior Fellow, Institute for Public Policy Studies; Professor of Law; and Professor of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Clayton has been studying and teaching the ethical, legal, and social implications of developments in genetics for more than a quarter of a century and has published two books and more than 75 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. She has been an active participant in policy debates advising the National Human Genome Research Institute as well as numerous other federal and international bodies on an array of topics, ranging from issues in children’s health, including newborn screening, to the ethical conduct of research involving human subjects. In these roles, she has helped develop policy for numerous national and international organizations. Dr. Clayton is a member of the Health Sciences Policy Board of the Institute of Medicine, and has served on a number of other IOM committees. Manning Feinleib, M.D., M.P.H., Dr.P.H. (IOM member), is Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health of The Johns Hopkins University. He was Director of the National Center for Health Statistics from 1983 to 1995. His research interests include epidemiology of cardiovascular diseases with emphasis on demographic and secular trends, international comparisons, and effects of socioeconomic factors, nutrition, and prevention; vital statistics, population surveys, and linkage of data bases with emphasis on confidentiality issues, improving data quality, and facilitating research uses of large data bases. Dr. Feinleib is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Epidemiology. He is the recipient of the 2004 American College of Epidemiology Abraham Lilienfeld award for lifetime contributions to the field. Among his contributions to National Academies studies is his service on a recent IOM Panel on Gulf War and Health. Mark S. Goldberg, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, and Associate Member in their joint Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health, and in the Department of Oncology. He is also Medical Scientist in the Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre. Dr. Goldberg is an occupational and environmental epidemiologist and holds an Investigator Award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. His current research interests include the investigation of occupational and environmental risk factors for cancer and the health effects associated with exposures to ambient air pollution. In addition to being a member of grant review panels, Dr. Goldberg was also a member of the McGill University Institutional Review Board, and is a member of Health Canada’s Science Advisory Board. He has also served on a number of other National Academies committees.

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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study Susan E. Hankinson, Sc.D., M.P.H., is Associate Professor of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Hankinson’s research interests include the use of biomarkers in epidemiologic studies; the relationships between hormones (endogenous and exogenous) and subsequent risk of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; and risk factors for eye disease. Her primary research base is the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII), two large prospective cohort studies that have been ongoing since 1976 and 1989 respectively. Similarly, Dr. Hankinson is currently conducting a range of studies on premenopausal endogenous hormones and breast cancer risk in the NHSII cohort. Her study evaluates lifestyle factors in relation to ovarian, endometrial, and breast cancers in women, and she is starting several new projects to assess potential biochemical and genetic predictors of risk of these cancers. David A. Kalman, Ph.D., is Chair and Professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. He is an organic chemist by training and is interested in several aspects of chemical behavior as they relate to environmental health, including integrated human exposure assessment using chemical biomarkers of exposure. Among his current research projects is an ongoing assessment of exposures, health status, and possible mechanistic or genetic susceptibility aspects of diseases associated with arsenic poisoning via drinking water. Other research is elucidating the role of personal factors in governing toxicokinetics of inhaled solvents and evaluating biomarkers of exposure to inhaled particulate matter. In the early 1990s, he served on the National Academies’ Committee on National Monitoring of Human Tissues. De Juran Richardson, Ph.D., is a Professor at Lake Forest College, and Senior Adjunct Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Richardson received his Ph.D., M.S., and B.A. degrees from Northwestern University. His professional activities include appointments on the ECOG Data Monitoring Committee (since 1994) and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) Initial Grant Review Panel (through 2005) and Advisory Board for the Harvard School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics, Summer Program in Biostatistics. Dr. Richardson has research interests in the design and analysis of large, multi-center, clinical trials; issues involving the recruitment and retention of underrepresented minorities in clinical trials; and performing statistical survival analyses in the presence of informative censoring. Dr. Richardson’s research articles have appeared in several scientific journals: Statistics in Medicine, Communications in Statistics, Journal of the National Technical Association, Journal of the National Medical Association, Neuroepidemiology, Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Clinical Oncology, and Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study Regina M. Santella, Ph.D., is Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University and serves as director for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Center for Environmental Health in Northern Manhattan, the Carcinogenesis Program and Biomarkers Core Facility of the Cancer Center, and the Jean Sindab African American Breast Cancer Project. Dr. Santella’s research involves the development of laboratory methods for the detection of human exposure to environmental and occupational carcinogens, and their use in molecular epidemiology studies to identify causative factors, susceptible populations, and preventive interventions. Dr. Santella has a M.S. in organic chemistry from the University of Massachusetts and a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the City University of New York. She has served as a member of the Metabolic Pathology Study Section as well as ad hoc reviewer for the American Cancer Society and NIEHS. She is currently a Senior Editor of Cancer Research; Past Chairperson of the Molecular Epidemiology Working Group of the American Association for Cancer Research, and Chair of the Molecular Epidemiology Subcommittee of the Southwest Oncology Group. Consultants James Hodge, J.D., L.L.M., is Associate Professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where he teaches international human rights, bioethics, and health information privacy. He also serves as Executive Director of the Center for Law and the Public’s Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins universities. Dr. Hodge explores issues in public health law, health policy, bioethics, health information privacy, and genetics. As an Adjunct Professor of Law at Georgetown, he has lectured on constitutional law, public health law, medical ethics, international human rights, and health law and policy. Dr. Hodge consults with multiple governmental and private organizations and speaks extensively at national and regional conferences on a variety of health topics. Victor Pontes, M.S., is a Senior Data Manager of the Nurses Health Study at the Channing Laboratory in the Harvard School of Public Health. Mr. Pontes is responsible for the management of biorespository data for several million biospecimens from approximately 100,000 participants. He has seven years of experience using the SAS system for data manipulation and analysis. Mr. Pontes received his masters in software engineering from Brandeis University. Staff Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., is Director of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices. Before joining IOM,

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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study she was Senior Health Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she studied the effects of health-system change on the public-health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health care workforce. Dr. Martinez is former Assistant Director for Health Financing and Policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office, for which she directed evaluations and policy analysis on national and public health issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. David A. Butler, Ph.D., is a senior program officer in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices. He received his B.S. and M.S. in engineering from the University of Rochester and Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie-Mellon University. Before joining IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment and was Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He has directed several IOM studies on environmental-health and risk-assessment topics, resulting in the reports Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998, and … Update 2000; the report series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam; Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures; and Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Amy R. O’Connor, M.P.H. candidate, is a research associate in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices. She will complete her M.P.H. in Environmental and Occupational Health at the George Washington University School of Public Health in May 2006. She is a recipient of the George Washington University Ruhland Fellowship for outstanding applicant. She graduated from George Mason University magna cum laude with a B.A. in chemistry in 2003. She is also a first Gulf War-era Army veteran during which time she served as combat photographer. Disposition of the Air Force Health Study is her first report with IOM. Sonia J. Cheruvillil, M.P.H., is a senior program assistant in the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices. She recently graduated with a masters in public health from the George Washington University School of Public Health. She received her undergraduate degrees in English literature (B.A.) and microbiology (B.S.) from the University of Iowa. She is involved with the IOM Report Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2005 as well Update 2007. Disposition of the Air Force Health Study is Sonia’s second report with IOM.

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Disposition of the Air Force Health Study Michael Saulle, B.S., is a clinical trials researcher at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center’s Department of Medicine in New York City. He received his BS in health studies/premed from Georgetown University. He interned at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the spring of his senior year where he worked as a research assistant on the Disposition of the Air Force Health Study.