Appendix B
Committee Biographical Sketches

Samuel L. Katz, Chair, is the Wilburt Cornell Davison Professor and Chairman emeritus of Pediatrics at Duke University. Following his medical training at Harvard University, pediatrics residency, and a research fellowship in virology and infectious diseases, he became a staff member at Children’s Hospital working with Nobel laureate John F. Enders. During his 12 years with Enders, they developed the attenuated measles virus vaccine now used worldwide. Katz’ career has been devoted to infectious disease research focusing principally on vaccine research, development and policy. In addition to his investigations of measles, he has been involved in studies of vaccinia, polio, rubella, influenza, pertussis, haemophilus influenzae b conjugates, HIV and others. Dr. Katz has received many honors including the Howland Medal of the American Pediatric Society and the Gold Medal of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1982. He currently chairs the Board of the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, Korea, and, in the past, chaired the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Redbook Committee), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the CDC, the Vaccine Priorities Study of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and several WHO, CVI and NIH panels. He has also chaired the Public Policy Council of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and currently co-chairs its National Network for Immunization Information.



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Exploring the Role of Antiviral Drugs in the Eradication of Polio: Workshop Report Appendix B Committee Biographical Sketches Samuel L. Katz, Chair, is the Wilburt Cornell Davison Professor and Chairman emeritus of Pediatrics at Duke University. Following his medical training at Harvard University, pediatrics residency, and a research fellowship in virology and infectious diseases, he became a staff member at Children’s Hospital working with Nobel laureate John F. Enders. During his 12 years with Enders, they developed the attenuated measles virus vaccine now used worldwide. Katz’ career has been devoted to infectious disease research focusing principally on vaccine research, development and policy. In addition to his investigations of measles, he has been involved in studies of vaccinia, polio, rubella, influenza, pertussis, haemophilus influenzae b conjugates, HIV and others. Dr. Katz has received many honors including the Howland Medal of the American Pediatric Society and the Gold Medal of the Sabin Vaccine Institute, and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1982. He currently chairs the Board of the International Vaccine Institute in Seoul, Korea, and, in the past, chaired the Committee on Infectious Diseases of the American Academy of Pediatrics (Redbook Committee), the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the CDC, the Vaccine Priorities Study of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and several WHO, CVI and NIH panels. He has also chaired the Public Policy Council of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and currently co-chairs its National Network for Immunization Information.

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Exploring the Role of Antiviral Drugs in the Eradication of Polio: Workshop Report Raul Andino is Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Dr. Andino joined the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of California, San Francisco in 1992 and began a program to develop RNA viruses as vaccine vectors. His laboratory is interested in the fundamental questions of how viruses cause disease and how the host defends itself against viruses. He has continued an intensive investigation of RNA virus replication and has discovered an important connection between viral replication and viral translation. More recently, his laboratory has begun investigating the potential use of RNA mutagens and RNA interference as antiviral drugs. Dr. Andino has published over 50 papers in prestigious journals, co-directs a graduate course in animal viruses at UCSF, is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Virology and Virology, and is the recipient of an Eli Lilly award in microbiological research and a Science Award from the Cancer Federation. Dr. Andino has served on numerous advisory committees to the NIH including study sections and strategic planning for the AIDS vaccine program at NIAID. He received his B.S. in Microbiology and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He completed his postdoctoral work with Nobel laureate David Baltimore at the Whitehead Institute, MIT and at Rockefeller University from 1986-1992. Diane Joseph-McCarthy is a Principal Research Scientist in the Structural Biology and Computational Chemistry Division of the Chemical and Screening Sciences Department at Wyeth Research. Her research interests are in the general area of molecular recognition and include virtual screening, structure-based drug design, and computational methods. Dr. Joseph-McCarthy received her bachelor degree in Chemistry with a minor in Computer Science from Boston University and her doctorate degree in Physical Chemistry from MIT. While at MIT, she worked with Professors Gregory A. Petsko and Martin Karplus (Harvard University) and used computational approaches to study the reactivity of the enzyme triosephosphate isomerase. Following her Ph.D. dissertation, she was a Research Fellow in the Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School. This research involved the use and development of new computational methods for the design of small combinatorial libraries of capsid-binding ligands for poliovirus and the related rhinovirus. Dr. Joseph-McCarthy has been the recipient of postdoctoral fellowships from the Radcliffe Bunting Institute, the Charles A. King Medical Founda-

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Exploring the Role of Antiviral Drugs in the Eradication of Polio: Workshop Report tion, and the Giovanni Armenise-Harvard Foundation. She has more than 30 publications, several patents, and has given numerous invited talks. John F. Modlin is Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, Chairman of the Department of Pediatrics at Dartmouth Medical School, and Medical Director of the Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth. He is also a member of the Infectious Disease Section at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. He received both his A.B. and M.D. degrees from Duke University. His pediatric internship and residency were performed at the Children’s Hospital in Boston between 1971 and 1973, including a year at St. Mary’s Hospital in London. After 2 years of service with the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, he returned to Boston in 1975 to complete his residency and infectious disease fellowship. From 1978 to 1983 he was Instructor and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and physician at the Children’s Hospital in Boston. He moved to Johns Hopkins in 1983 where he headed the Pediatric AIDS Program and continued his research on enterovirus diseases. He has been at Dartmouth since 1991. Dr. Modlin’s research interests include perinatal viral infections, pathophysiology of enterovirus infections, and poliovirus immunization. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 papers in the medical literature on these or related topics. Dr. Modlin has served as Vice-Chair of the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group Executive Committee and as a Chair of the FDA Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee, and Chair of the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Neal Nathanson is Associate Dean for Global Health Programs at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. In July 2003, Dr. Nathanson retired as Vice Provost for Research at the University of Pennsylvania, responsible for oversight of the whole research enterprise of the University, having served since December 2000. From July 1998 to September 2000, Dr. Nathanson served as Director of the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) at the National Institutes of Health responsible for coordinating the scientific, budgetary, legislative, and policy components of the NIH AIDS research programs, as well as for promoting collaborative research activities in domestic and international settings. Dr. Nathanson was educated at Harvard University, where he received both a B.S. and an M.D., followed by clinical training in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and

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Exploring the Role of Antiviral Drugs in the Eradication of Polio: Workshop Report postdoctoral training in virology at the Johns Hopkins University. Early in his career, Dr. Nathanson spent 2 years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where he headed the Poliomyelitis Surveillance Unit. Later, he joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health, where he became Professor and head of the Division of Infectious Diseases in the Department of Epidemiology. He then moved to the University of Pennsylvania where he chaired the Department of Microbiology for 15 years, finally serving for 2 years as Vice Dean for Research and Research Training. Dr. Nathanson is particularly known for his contributions to the field of viral pathogenesis, having edited the definitive text on this subject. He has also made significant contributions to the epidemiology of viral diseases. Richard J. Whitley is Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He completed his undergraduate studies at Duke University. He completed medical school at George Washington University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. During postdoctoral training he developed an interest in pursuing molecular pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infections. These studies have been extended to collaboration with investigators at the University of Chicago through joint program projects. In addition, he is responsible for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Collaborative Antiviral Study Group, a multicenter collaboration of investigators attempting to improve the treatment of human herpes simplex and varicella zoster infections. Eckard Wimmer is a Distinguished Professor at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Born in Berlin, Germany, in 1936, Wimmer received the doctor rerum naturalium in Organic Chemistry in Goettingen, Germany, in 1962. Being intrigued by the chemistry of living cells, he switched his research interests first to biochemistry at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, in 1964, then to virology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, in 1966. Wimmer started his academic career as an Assistant Professor of Microbiology at St. Louis University, St. Louis, in 1968, where he began to study poliovirus, a system that became the scientific challenge of his life. In 1974, he joined the Department of Microbiology at Stony Brook University where he served as Chairperson from 1984 to 1999. In 2002 he was promoted to the rank of Distinguished Professor. Dr. Wimmer

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Exploring the Role of Antiviral Drugs in the Eradication of Polio: Workshop Report has always looked at viruses as biological entities that replicate and can cause disease, on the one hand, and as aggregates of organic compounds, on the other. His research therefore focuses on mechanisms of pathogenesis and the (bio)chemistry of poliovirus. The latter has led his research group to succeed in the cell-free chemical/biochemical synthesis of poliovirus in the absence of natural template. Dr. Wimmer has authored over 300 publications of which several described landmarks in virology.

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