Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups Appendixes

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups This page intentionally left blank.

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups A Biographies of Commitee Members and Staff David V. Kalbaugh (Co-Chair) recently retired as assistant director of programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), where he was responsible for the oversight of all laboratory technical programs. Prior to that assignment, Dr. Kalbaugh was head of the Power Projection Systems Department, where he was responsible for programs in strike warfare, defense communications, and information operations. His background is in tactical missile and precision strike systems. He joined JHU/APL in 1969 and was involved in the development of the Tomahawk cruise missile system at its inception. In addition to his supervisory and management duties, Dr. Kalbaugh taught for more than a decade in JHU’s Whiting School of Engineering. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including participation in tasks for the Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and for the Program Executive Officer for Theater Air Defense. Dr. Kalbaugh is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board. Nils R. Sandell, Jr. (Co-Chair), is vice president and general manager of BAE Systems Advanced Information Technologies. Dr. Sandell has an extensive background in military command, control, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems and technologies. His areas of expertise include automatic target recognition, sensor fusion, sensor resource management, and battle management/command, control, and communications. He is a former associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he lectured in the areas of estimation and control theory, stochastic processes, and computer systems. Dr. Sandell has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees—for example,

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups on the 2001 study of the Defense Science Board on Precision Weapons Targeting. Dr. Sandell is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Richard E. Blahut, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is Henry Magnuski Professor and head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His areas of expertise include information theory, error-control coding, digital communications, signal processing, imaging systems, optical recording, and magnetic and optical data storage. Previously, Dr. Blahut spent 30 years with the IBM Federal Systems Division, where his activities included the development of an error-control code and decoder algorithm used in the high-speed data link for the U.S. Navy’s Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS) helicopter, error-control codes used for communications with the Tomahawk missile, and passive coherent location systems now incorporated into several Department of Defense surveillance systems. An IBM Fellow and recipient of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Alexander Graham Bell Medal, Dr. Blahut has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees; he is a past president of the IEEE Information Theory Society. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Cornell University. John M. Borky is an engineering fellow at Raytheon Corporation, serving as chief architect of the Lockheed Martin/Raytheon team developing the Battle Management Command and Control (BMC2) subsystem of the E-10A Multimission Command and Control Aircraft program. His expertise involves integrated avionics, electronics, and weapons system architecture, and he has extensive experience in the physics and design of electronic devices and in real-time embedded processing, information systems, and command and control. Prior to joining Raytheon, Dr. Borky was chief scientist at Tamarac Technologies and senior scientist, vice president, and technical fellow at BDM International. These positions all followed his 25-year Air Force career, during which he worked in a wide range of assignments, including those of faculty member at the Air Force Institute of Technology and director of avionics at the Advanced Tactical Fighter System Program Office. His final Air Force appointment was as commander of the Rome Air Development Center, Rome, New York—during which time Dr. Borky managed the Rome Center’s reorganization into the primary Air Force command, control, communications, and intelligence development laboratory. Dr. Borky has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including his service for 3 years as vice chair of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a senior member of the IEEE. Joseph R. Cipriano is vice president for advanced solutions at Lockheed Martin Information Technology, where his expertise includes the design, development, and management of large-scale systems and programs. Previously, Mr. Cipriano

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups served as the Department of the Navy Program Executive Officer for Information Technology (PEO-IT) (1999 to 2002). His efforts in that role led to the establishment of the Navy/Marine Corps Intranet (NMCI) program, the Defense Integrated Military Human Resource System, and the Navy Standard Integrated Personnel System. Prior to serving as PEO-IT, Mr. Cipriano served at the Naval Sea Systems Command as the Navy’s first Battle Force System Engineer and as Deputy Commander for Warfare Systems. In the early 1990s, he was director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Superconducting Super Collider program. Among his many professional awards are the Navy Distinguished Civilian Service Award and the rank of Distinguished Executive in the Senior Executive Service. Archie R. Clemins, Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.), is president of Caribou Technologies and co-owner of TableRock International, LLC, both international consulting firms concentrating on the transitioning of commercial technology to government. He retired from the Navy after more than 30 years of service, concluding as commander-in-chief of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, the world’s largest combined fleet command. During his Navy service, he strongly supported the establishment of the Navy’s Information Technology for the 21st Century and NMCI initiatives. Building on this experience, Admiral Clemins has remained a strong advocate for the accelerated use of information technology and the adaptation of the best commercial practices in the military and the government. Currently, he is vice chairman of two start-up firms developing advanced electron beam systems. Admiral Clemins holds an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was recently elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Anthony C. DiRienzo is currently executive vice president and chief technology officer of COLSA Corporation, where his responsibilities include the oversight of a range of programs, including radar hardware-in-the-loop development, large-scale computing network development, advanced signal-processing algorithms, intelligence program support, acquisition and force management support, missile defense testing and evaluation, integrated system testbed development, complex system integration programs, and software independent validation and verification. His professional activities have also included directing the Army/Marine Corps Firefinder field artillery counterbattery radar program and serving as a staff officer in the Army Secretariat with responsibility for wide-ranging classified vulnerability assessment programs for Army weapons systems. He holds an M.A. from Georgetown University in international security and an M.S. in nuclear physics and a Ph.D. in plasma physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lee Hammarstrom is special assistant for space and information technology to the director at the Applied Research Laboratory/Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU). Previously, he was the first chief scientist at the National Recon-

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups naissance Office (NRO) and chief scientist at the Office of the Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence. He conceived and was the “systems integrator” for a program that President Reagan recognized in 1987: “… having successfully developed one of our nation’s vital space programs…, has contributed to maintaining a strong creditable defense posture for the United States….” He conceived and led the Global Grid/Global Information Grid initiative, which provided key elements of the Department of Defense’s (DOD’s) secure worldwide communications networks that successfully supported Operation Iraqi Freedom with more than 40 times the capacity of previous networks. Earlier, Mr. Hammarstrom held various positions at the Naval Research Laboratory in remote sensing, reconnaissance, and intelligence leading to the creation of the Space Systems Engineering Division. He has broad expertise in areas ranging from technology development to the testing and deploying of military and intelligence systems. Mr. Hammarstrom was named an NRO Pioneer in 2002 for his 40 years of contributions to national reconnaissance. James A. Hendler is professor at the University of Maryland and director of Semantic Web and Agent Technology at the Maryland Information and Network Dynamics Laboratory. He has joint appointments in the Department of Computer Science, the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, and the Institute for Systems Research; he is also an affiliate of the Electrical Engineering Department. Dr. Hendler’s expertise is in the areas of artificial intelligence, Semantic Web, agent-based computing, and high-performance processing. One of the inventors of the Semantic Web, he remains a prominent participant in the World Wide Web Consortium’s Semantic Web Activity and is chair of the Web Ontology Working Group. Previously, Dr. Hendler served on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and as chief scientist of the Information Systems Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He is a fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. Barry M. Horowitz, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is professor of systems engineering at the University of Virginia. His expertise is in the design and development of large-scale networks and information systems; the application of security technology to large, network-based commerce systems; and the design of large systems that involve coupling private data systems or mission-critical support systems with open networks, such as the Internet. A former chair and founder of Concept Five Technologies, Dr. Horowitz also served as president and chief executive officer of the MITRE Corporation and of Mitretek Systems. He was awarded the highest civilian award of the U.S. Air Force for his contributions during the Gulf War in locating, tracking, and destroying Scud missiles. Dr. Horowitz holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from New York University.

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups Richard J. Ivanetich is Institute Fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). His experience spans a number of areas of defense systems, technology, and operations analyses, relating primarily to computer and information systems, command-and-control systems and procedures, modeling and simulation of systems and forces, crisis management, and strategic and theater nuclear forces. His previous positions at IDA include serving as director of the Computer and Software Engineering Division and as assistant director of the System Evaluation Division. Prior to joining IDA in 1975, Dr. Ivanetich was assistant professor of physics at Harvard University. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees such as the NRC’s Naval Studies Board and the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group. Harry W. Jenkins, Jr. retired from the U.S. Marine Corps with the rank of major general. He is director of business development and congressional liaison at ITT Defense Industries, where he is responsible for activities in support of tactical communications systems and airborne electronic warfare with the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, National Guard, and appropriate committees in Congress. General Jenkins’s background is in expeditionary warfare, particularly in regard to its mission use of command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) systems. During Desert Storm, General Jenkins served as commanding general of the Fourth Marine Expeditionary Brigade, for which he directed operational planning, training, and employment of the ground units, aviation assets, and command-and-control systems in the 17,000-person amphibious force. General Jenkins’s last position before retirement from the U.S. Marine Corps was as director of expeditionary warfare for the Chief of Naval Operations; while serving in that capacity he initiated a detailed program for C4I systems improvements for large-deck amphibious ships, as well as managing all programs of naval mine warfare and reorganizing the Navy’s unmanned aerial vehicle efforts for operations from aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Marine Corps Association, Marine Corps Aviation Association, Expeditionary Warfare Division of the Naval Defense Industry Association, Navy League, and Adjutant Generals Association of the United States. General Jenkins is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Jerry A. Krill is the assistant director of programs at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL), and in that capacity oversees more than 400 programs. He previously led JHU/APL’s Power Projection Systems Department, with two principal areas: precision engagement and infocentric operations. Dr. Krill also serves as the laboratory’s chief quality officer. Dr. Krill joined JHU/APL in 1973, and his expertise includes weapons systems engineering, sensor and weapons networks, missile defense, over-the-horizon missile command-and-control systems, and microwave technology. His prior positions at JHU/APL include programs manager for the Air and Missile Defense Area and

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups supervisor of the Weapon Systems Engineering Branch. Dr. Krill holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland. Annette J. Krygiel is an independent consultant with expertise in the management of large-scale systems, particularly in regard to software development and systems integration. While a visiting fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies at the National Defense University, she wrote a book on large-scale system integration. Before being appointed to the Institute for National Strategic Studies, Dr. Krygiel was director of the Central Imagery Office (CIO), a Department of Defense combat support agency. Dr. Krygiel remained the director for 27 months, until the CIO joined the National Imagery and Mapping Agency in October 1996. Dr. Krygiel began her career at the Defense Mapping Agency, where she held various positions; her service there culminated as chief scientist. She has served on several NRC activities, including the Panel on Distributed Geolibraries: Spatial Information Resources and as chair of the Committee on the Role of Experimentation in Building Future Naval Forces. She is a former member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Julius Longshore is the E-2/C-2 Integrated Product Team (IPT) Product Build Director in the Airborne Early Warning and Electronic Warfare Systems Business Area of the Northrop Grumman Corporation, where his expertise is in the testing and evaluation engineering of airborne early-warning systems. A naval aviator since 1976, Mr. Longshore flew as a Navy E-2C pilot and recently retired from the Naval Reserves with the rank of captain. He became an engineering test pilot for Grumman Aerospace Corporation in 1981, and as a senior experimental test pilot, has logged more than 6,000 hours in more than 15 types of aircraft. Mr. Longshore also served as test and evaluation project engineer for Northorp Grumman’s Airborne Early Warning IPT. He holds two B.S. degrees, in mathematics and physics, from Clark Atlanta University and an M.B.A. from Adelphi University. John S. Quilty recently retired as senior vice president and director of the Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) DOD Federally Funded Research and Development Center at the MITRE Corporation. His activities have been focused on the support of the Army, Navy, Defense Information Systems Agency, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other members of the national security community. Mr. Quilty’s focus is also on the support of DOD initiatives and activities designed to achieve improved command, control, communications, computer, and intelligence support to joint operations. For the past several years, he has been engaged with the concepts and system-of-system capabilities associated with the DOD’s vision of Network-Centric Operations. Previously, he served as vice president of the MITRE Washington C3I Center. Mr. Quilty is a member of the executive committee of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronic Association (AFCEA) board of

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups directors. He served as chair of the Military Communications Conference Board (IEEE/AFCEA-sponsored). Mr. Quilty also served on the NRC Committee to Review DOD C4I Plans and Programs. He has an M.S. in electrical engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. in the same field from Princeton University. John J. Shaw is chief engineer for BAE Systems Advanced Information Technologies. His expertise is in operations research for large-scale systems and human performance aspects of military battle management, command, and control (BMC2). Dr. Shaw has more than 20 years of experience in the development of engagement planning algorithms and command-and-control concepts for missile defense, electronic warfare, and logistics systems; configuration of multishop maintenance facilities; and real-time electronic countermeasure power management algorithms for tactical aircraft. His recent activities focus on resolving the technical and operational impediments to precision strike, including time-critical targeting, and the technical and operational impediments to network-centric warfare, including Service-specific initiatives. Dr. Shaw was ALPHATECH’s lead engineer for BMC2 on the DARPA Affordable Moving Surface Target Engagement program and was the architect of an integrated engagement control concept demonstrated in flight tests in 2001. More recently, he has been researching adaptable, mission-centric workflow management and service-oriented computing infrastructures (e.g., grid computing). John P. Stenbit, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, is an independent consultant. He recently served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration and as the DOD’s Chief Information Officer. Mr. Stenbit has had a career that spans more than 30 years of public and private-sector service in telecommunications and command and control. In addition to his recent service, his public service includes 2 years as principal deputy director of Telecommunications and Command and Control Systems, and 2 years as staff specialist for Worldwide Command and Control Systems, both in the Office of the Secretary of Defense. Mr. Stenbit previously was executive vice president at TRW, retiring in May 2001. He joined TRW in 1968 and was responsible for the planning and analysis of advanced satellite surveillance systems. Prior to joining TRW, he held a position with the Aerospace Corporation involving command-and-control systems for missiles and satellites, and satellite data compression and pattern recognition. During this time, he was a Fulbright Fellow and Aerospace Corporation Fellow at the Technische Hogeschool, Einhoven, Netherlands, concentrating on coding theory and data compression. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including as chair of the Science and Technology Advisory Panel to the Director of Central Intelligence and as a member of the Science Advisory Group to the Directors of Naval Intelligence and the Defense Communications Agency.

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups John F. Vesecky was founding chairman of the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of California at Santa Cruz (1999-2004) and is now associate chairman. His interests include remote sensing, radar, and space and electronic system design: specifically, use of active and passive microwave methods for the measurement of sea surface winds and temperature; integration of high-frequency (HF) radar current measurements into physical, chemical, and biological ocean models; the development and application of HF radar for naval and civil applications; and the interpretation of synthetic aperture radar images of the ocean. He teaches engineering-system-design courses oriented toward spacecraft systems. Dr. Vesecky, a member of the Electromagnetics Academy, has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the Department of Energy’s Technical Oversight Group for Climate Investigations. His experience in academe also includes positions at the University of Leicester (United Kingdom), Stanford University, and the University of Michigan. Dr. Vesecky holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University and a B.S. from Rice University. Peter J. Weinberger is a staff member at Google, Incorporated, where his responsibilities include software design and implementation. His expertise is oriented in computer sciences and includes proficiency in operating systems (Unix in particular), compilers, network file systems, security, statistics, computer speech, and number theory. His prior positions include those as vice president for information sciences research at Bell Laboratories, head of technology for Renaissance Technologies, and professor of mathematics at the University of Michigan. He has also served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, such as the Army Science Board. Dr. Weinberger holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley. David A. Whelan is vice president and general manager of Boeing’s Phantom Works Division. Prior to joining Boeing in 2001, Dr. Whelan was director of the Tactical Technology Office at DARPA, where he led the development of enabling technologies, such as unmanned vehicles and space-based moving target indicator radar systems. Prior to his position with DARPA, Dr. Whelan held several positions of increasing responsibility with Hughes Aircraft. His experience in high-technology development also includes roles as a research physicist for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and as one of four lead engineers at Northrop Grumman assigned to the design and development of the B-2 Stealth Bomber Program. He is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Cindy Williams is a principal research scientist of the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her areas of expertise include the national security budget, command and control of military forces, conventional air and ground forces, and nuclear weapons. Formerly she was assistant director

OCR for page 219
C4ISR for Future Naval Strike Groups for national security at the Congressional Budget Office, where she led the National Security Division in studies of budgetary and policy choices related to defense and international security. Dr. Williams has served as a director and in other capacities at the MITRE Corporation in Bedford, Massachusetts; as a member of the Senior Executive Service in the Office of the Secretary of Defense at the Pentagon; and at RAND in Santa Monica, California. She is the editor and one of several authors of Filling the Ranks: Transforming the U.S. Military Personnel System (2004) and of Holding the Line: U.S. Defense Alternatives for the Early 21st Century (2001). Dr. Williams is a member of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Staff Charles F. Draper is director of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. Before joining the NRC in 1997, Dr. Draper was the lead mechanical engineer at S.T. Research Corporation, where he provided technical and program management support for satellite Earth station and small satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used an atomic-force microscope to measure the nanomechanical properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Incorporated, working on-site at NRL on the development of an underwater X-ray backscattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Arul Mozhi is senior program officer at the NRC’s Naval Studies Board; he also served as senior program officer at the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design and National Materials Advisory Board. Prior to joining the NRC in 1999, Dr. Mozhi was senior scientist and program manager at UTRON, Inc., a high-tech company in the Washington, D.C., area, working on pulsed electrical and chemical energy technologies applied to materials processing. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Mozhi was a senior engineer and task leader at Roy F. Weston, Inc., a leading environmental consulting company working on long-term nuclear materials behavior and systems engineering related to nuclear waste transport, storage, and disposal in support of the U.S. Department of Energy. Before 1989 he was a materials scientist at Marko Materials, Inc., a high-tech firm in the Boston area, working on rapidly solidified materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in 1986) in materials engineering from the Ohio State University and then served as a postdoctoral research associate there. He received his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1982.